Frederick Forsyth, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Literary Salons in Afghanistan

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Mariella Frostrup talks to Frederick Forsyth, forty years after he wrote his ground-breaking novel, The Day of the Jackal. The book was one of the first modern international conspiracy thrillers and has spawned an entire genre of writing.

Authors Louise Welsh and Francis Spufford pay homage to one of the giants of English literature, Robert Louis Stevenson, who until very recently, was viewed by the critical establishment as a second-rate writer.

Plus, how amateur writers across Afghanistan are getting together to critique each other's work in home-grown literary salons.

PRODUCER: Aasiya Lodhi and Ella-mai Robey.

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30 minutes

Last on

Thu 26 May 2011 16:00

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