Episode 7

Image for Episode 7Not currently available on BBC iPlayer

Bang Goes the Theory, Series 4 Episode 7 of 8

Duration: 30 minutes

This episode of the series that reveals your world with a bang has a royal wedding theme. Jem builds a singing road as a present for the royal couple. Dr Yan explains the science of dad dancing. And Liz uses DNA to track her family tree right back to the earliest humans.

The programme is co-produced with the Open University. For more ways to put science to the test, go to www.bbc.co.uk/bang and follow the links to The Open University.

  • Unzip your genes

    Unzip your genes

    Did you know that humans have more chromosomes per cell than a pig, but less than a chicken?

    Find out about genes, chromosomes, DNA and inheritance at The Open University, and then test your knowledge by taking the Unzip Your Genes quiz.

    And while you're there, don't forget to order a free set of Your Genome fridge magnets.

    The Open University: Unzip Your Genes
  • FAMILY MATTERS

    FAMILY MATTERS

    Liz uses DNA (and sticky-backed plastic) to trace her genetic ancestry.

  • ASKING DR YAN

    You must enable javascript to play content

    Ouch! Dr Yan takes the sting out of nettles to answer a question from Ellen in New York, who asked: How do stinging nettles sting?

  • BIRDMAN

    BIRDMAN

    What would happen if you put chicken genes into a human?

    Find out the expert's answer
  • EASTER EGG

    EASTER EGG

    Dr Yan shows you how to get a whole egg into a glass bottle. A cracking experiment!

    Watch Dr Yan's egg sucker guide

Credits

Presenter
Dallas Campbell
Presenter
Dallas Campbell
Presenter
Liz Bonnin
Presenter
Liz Bonnin
Presenter
Jem Stansfield
Presenter
Jem Stansfield
Series Producer
Paul King
Series Producer
Paul King

Broadcasts

The Open University

The Open University

If Bang stirs your interest in science then visit The Open University and discover more.

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