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27/09/2010

Duration:
1 hour, 55 minutes
First broadcast:
Monday 27 September 2010

Travis frontman Fran Healy joins Simon Mayo in the studio tonight performing two songs live. Expect to hear his new single Buttercups and a rather special take on a classic hit, as part of Radio 2's Great British Songbook.

Plus, Sport reports served up by Matt Williams, Money matters with Pauline McCole and the very latest travel updates with Sally Boazman.

Music Played

13 items
  • Know Your Place

    Know Your Place

    During All Request Friday, we had a caller from Scraptoft, which reminded Simon of a Douglas Adams quote. He reinvents the name Scraptoft as “The absurd flap of hair a vain and balding man grows long above one ear to comb it to the other ear.” There are all sorts of fabulous place names across Britain, so we got a few from Glen Hart, who is head of research at map gods Ordnance Survey.

  • Fran The Man

    Fran The Man

    Travis frontman Fran Healy performed his solo single 'Buttercups', and also 'Wonderful Life' by Black for The Great British Songbook. He also talked about his new life in Germany, and how he became a vegetarian to say thank you to Beatle Sir Paul McCartney.

  • Confession: 'Feeling Sheepish'

    Dear Simon

    Many years ago back at our urban school, our GCSE PE class went away for a trip to Wales. We did all kind of things including abseiling down some lovely mountains, and although we found the countryside to be a really pleasant place, as you can imagine there are going to be one or to problems taking 30 16 year olds away. So on the first night every one tried to show how "grown up" we were by staying awake all night.
    We spent the night going from cabin to cabin, telling tales and having a good time knowing we weren’t meant to be awake. Come 2am, we decided it would be a good idea to play a game of rugby on the patch of grass in front of all the cabins, but after ten minutes or so our teacher who was also head of year came out of her cabin and slowly started to walk down the path towards us. By this point we all knew what was going to happen, we were just bound to be sent to bed and would pay for it in the morning. But suddenly she stopped and there was a flicker of hope for us all when we thought she might just be answering the call of nature, and hadn’t noticed our night-time sporting activities.

    However, we were wrong. Rapidly picking up speed, she moved towards us, and it turned out that it wasn’t a good idea to have woken her up. So Simon, before sending us to bed, we were informed in no uncertain terms that our work load was going to be tripled for the next day, and within minutes we were all back in our cabins, tucked up in bed. Well, most of us were…

    I was being spoken to by her about the matter of what had just happened, when I heard a sheep baa-ing in the distance, and, as I stood there trying to look sorry, this noise was the sparking point of a genius plan what was unravelling more quickly than I could keep up with, so I decided to involve a good friend of mine. At 3 in the morning, with the stern teacher now back in bed, we sneaked out of our bunks, making sure not to wake any of our other friends, got dressed and headed back out side. After stumbling around in the dark, we found our way to the country lane running out to the main road. A mile or so up there was a field, and once again I heard the sheep baa-ing. We climbed over the farmers fence and persisted to walk though the muddy field for what seemed a hour until we came across a herd of sheep. This is when I explained my whole plan to my friend. We set back off towards our camp but with a few extra friends of the woolly variety.

    Now if I had known this when I first thought of the plan, I wouldn’t have bothered, but let me tell you Simon, for a townie like me, herding sheep isn’t a case of just running up and down, it’s a lot harder than it looks, and after half a hour or so we were back at the fence on the farm’s boundary. Not an easy task. I climbed back over, and we carefully passed the sheep over on to the country lane and then back down to our camp. So there we were, 2 lads, 6 sheep and mischief to come. I thought it would be clever to get back at our head of year before she could get us the next morning, so we sneaked up to her cabin, managed to skilfully prise the window open and my friend - being a bit slimmer than me, squeezed through to open the door at which point we led the sheep in. As soon as the last one was in, the door was relocked and the window pressed back in.

    Let me tell you Simon, the next morning was a delight - just a dumbstruck teacher waking up to some equally bewildered sheep locked in her cabin. The look on her face when she finally emerged from her room was priceless. Of course by that time, an audience of , oh, about 30 or so of us had all made our way to her door.
    I have no idea why Simon, but the first people to get interrogated about this matter were me and my sheep-herding friend, but we blatantly denied all knowledge and blamed in on a small boy in our year, who we’ll call, er, Larry.

    So I beg forgiveness from little Larry, who took the rap for my evil nocturnal shepherding, the Farm owner, who awoke to a surprisingly empty field, and of course the sheep, for disturbing their sleep. I'm sorry for this but really, what would you expect to happen?

    Anon

Broadcasts

Watch Simon's Edinburgh Book Club Special

Edinburgh Book Club Special

See Simon host a special Radio 2 Book Club live at Potterrow.

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