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Duration: 1 hour

Alice Roberts embarks on a quest to discover what lies behind the passion for wild swimming, now becoming popular in Britain. She follows in the wake of Waterlog, the classic swimming text by the late journalist and author, Roger Deakin.

Her journey takes in cavernous plunge pools, languid rivers and unfathomable underground lakes, as well as a skinny dip in a moorland pool. Along the way Alice becomes aware that she is not alone on her watery journey.

Last on

Sun 12 Aug 2012 01:25 BBC Four

  • The Call of the Wild

    The Call of the Wild

    This programme is part of The Call Of The Wild on BBC Four, a celebration of the great British love affair with the countryside – whatever the weather.

    Go to The Call of the Wild site
  • Environment Agency Tips

    • Don’t jump or dive into rivers - the depth is uncertain and there can be unseen dangers in the water.

    • Be aware of strong currents and don’t go into water near weirs, locks, pipes and sluices.

    • Take notice of safety information, warning signs and flags. Know what they mean and do as they advise.

    • Water can be very cold no matter what time of year. Cold water can quickly cause cramp and breathing problems making it difficult to swim.

    • Keep away from the river’s edge and supervise young children. Drowning can occur very quickly, even in shallow water.

    • Wear the recommended safety equipment for your activity, such as life jackets and helmets.

    • Airbeds, inner tubes and other floatation devices can easily be carried or blown into deep water and may not keep you afloat.

    • Consuming alcohol may impair your ability and judgment when on or in water.

    • Get trained in lifesaving and resuscitation techniques. Know what to do in an emergency.

    • Teach children to swim and not to go into water alone, or unsupervised. Always ensure someone knows where you are and what you’re doing.


    What to do if you see someone in difficulties:

    • Get help: Ring 999 or get someone else to. If you are on your own without a mobile phone, shout for help if people are nearby, or go and get help.

    • Think: Of your own safety first. Don’t go into the water to rescue someone – you may get in trouble too.

    • Reach: A stick, scarf or clothes tied together can help you reach the person. Crouch or lie down to avoid being pulled into the water.

    • Throw: A rope is best - you can pull the person to dry land. If you don’t have rope, throwing something in that will float, such as a ball, a plastic bottle or a lifebuoy, will help keep the person afloat until help arrives.

    Environment Agency: Water safety warning

Credits

Presenter
Alice Roberts
Presenter
Alice Roberts
Producer
David Johnson
Producer
David Johnson
Director
David Johnson
Director
David Johnson
Executive Producer
William Lyons
Executive Producer
William Lyons

Broadcasts

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