Voting - Eurovision: You Decide

Eurovision: You Decide is the chance for the Nation to pick our Eurovision UK act for 2018. The show will broadcast live from the historic Brighton Dome on Wednesday the 7th of February and hosted by Mel Giedroyc and former winner Måns Zelmerlöw. Six acts will compete for the chance to represent the UK in Lisbon. After each act has performed a public vote will open. Details of how to vote are below.

Listen to the songs here.

Where to vote online

When the vote is open, head over to the Whistle Test homepage. You’ll find the vote at the top of the page. But remember, the page you’re currently reading just provides the instructions – it’s not the voting page and you cannot vote from here.

1. Get Ready To Vote

Before you can vote, you need to be signed in with your BBC account.

Already have a BBC account?
You can sign-in any time at bbc.com/signin.

Don’t have an account?
You can register at any time at bbc.com/register

Top tips:

  • You only need to register once and you will stay signed in on the device you registered with unless you choose to sign out.
  • Make sure you’re registered, signed-in and ready in plenty of time before the vote opens as you don’t have long to vote.

2. Vote

When the vote is open, it will appear at the top of the Whistle Test homepage. If you can’t see it, try refreshing the page.

You can then select your favourite act by clicking the small circular button next to their names.

3. Click 'Vote Now'

Once you’ve made your mind up, simply click ‘Vote Now’ and your vote will be submitted. Remember you can only vote once online so choose your act carefully.

Vote Format

The aim of Eurovision: You Decide is to choose the UK’s entry for the Eurovision Song Contest Final. As one of the "Big 5" countries taking part in the Eurovision Song Contest, the UK is not required to compete in the Semi-Finals and so we feel it is extremely important for our national selection process to put potential songs and performers through a rigorous test that is as close to elements of the ESC Final as possible. Those elements include:

· live vocal performance, in front of a live audience, on live TV
· performance in a large venue
· ability to impress public voters
· ability to impress professional jurors

Following the introduction of a revised scoring system in the ESC Final in 2016, the importance of an entry being able to impress both the voting public AND expert juries has become more explicit and by using both in our national selection we are recognising that fact.

Our public vote and our jury vote both take place immediately after all 6 songs have been performed in the live TV show and we do not reveal the result of the jury vote prior to the public vote, or vice versa. It is important that neither vote influences the other - just as in the ESC.

Once both votes are complete and verified, they will each reveal a ranking of the 6 songs from 1st to 6th. The rankings will then be used to award points from 6 (1st position) to 1 (6th position) for each vote.

The points each song has been awarded by both votes are then added together. The song with the highest combined total of points will be declared the winner. In the event of a tie break for first position, the song which received more points in the public vote will be declared the winner.

As happened with the ESC Final in 2016, a win of only the jury vote or only the public vote doesn't guarantee an overall win. The song that will win, is the one that performs best across BOTH the public and jury vote, so the artists need to impress both the jury AND the public as their votes have equal weighting – apart from the tie-break situation where the public vote is the decider.

Our Judges in 2018 are...

Caroline Sullivan - Music Journalist, The Guardian

Roisin O'Connor - Music Correspondent, The Independent

Steve Tandy - Regional Radio Promoter

Sara Sesardic -Music Editor at Spotify

Alastair Webber - A&R Manager

Marco Sensi -Music Editor, MTV Music

(Head Judge) David Grant -Vocal Coach

Kele Le Roc -Artist, writer and creative

Help

The Old Grey Whistle Test Anniversary Show 2018 – Online Vote Terms and Conditions

1. In order to vote, you must be a UK resident (including Channel Islands and the Isle of Man) and not be a BBC employee, employee of any of its affiliates, close relative of any such employees.

2. Votes can be made online by accessing www.bbc.co.uk/whistletest from 22nd February 2018 during Steve Wright’s show on Radio 2 when the vote will be launched and opened until around 23:15 on 23rd February 2018 during The Old Grey Whistle Test Anniversary show on BBC Four when the vote will be closed.

3. You may only vote once. Voting is restricted to UK only. Any votes received outside the voting window will not count.

4. Online voting requires you to log into the page with your BBC account at www.bbc.com/signin. If you do not have a BBC account, you can register for one for free at www.bbc.com/register. If you have any trouble registering or signing in, you can visit the help pages at www.bbc.com/signin/help. Please check your broadband or mobile contract to check the cost of using data services.

5. Bob Harris will choose his 4 favourite performances from The Old Grey Whistle Test archive. You can vote for your favourite.

6. The winner will be announced in BBC Four’s The Old Grey Whistle Test Anniversary Show on 23rd February 2018.

7. No correspondence relating to the vote will be entered into.

8. There will be no prize for anyone taking part in the vote.

9. Users who vote online are subject to the BBC Privacy Policy, BBC Cookies Policy and BBC online Terms of Use.

10. The BBC reserves the right to disqualify entries or suspend voting if it has reasonable grounds to suspect that fraudulent voting has occurred or if it considers there has been any attempt to rig the voting. The BBC has the right to substitute an alternative selection method at its absolute discretion.

11. For the purposes of investigating possible voting irregularities when voting on bbc.co.uk using BBC account the BBC may use cookies, log IP addresses or analyse the information from your BBC account. The BBC will not publish this information or provide it to anyone without permission, except where required for enforcement of these terms.

12. If, for any reason, the online voting system fails, the vote may be suspended or a contingency plan may be actioned.

13. The BBC reserves the right to change, cancel or suspend the vote at any time.

14. The BBC cannot accept any responsibility whatsoever for any technical failure or malfunction, or any other problem with any online system, server, provider or otherwise which may result in any vote being lost or not properly registered and recorded.

15. This vote complies with the BBC's Code of Conduct for Competitions and Votes: BBC Code of Conduct for Voting

16. The BBC will use your personal data in accordance with our Privacy Policy, our Cookies Policy and our Terms of Use. For example, we may use your personal data for the purpose of running the vote (including processing refunds or investigating possible voting irregularities) and for the purpose of personalising our services where you have shown interest in a particular show, including voting online (http://www.bbc.co.uk/usingthebbc/account/how-is-the-bbc-personalised-to-me).

17. These Terms and Conditions are governed by the laws of England and Wales.

Voting FAQ - Telephone Voting

We state clearly on screen and verbally when the voting period opens and closes and that callers should wait until that time before casting their vote. There is a small chance that if you called outside this time that another network other than BT would charge for this call. If you have been charged, then notify your service provider immediately.

All voters are asked to dial carefully. The BBC has implemented a thorough testing schedule before each show to ensure correct audio is playing on the correct entrant line. If you have a phone bill you can send us, we can check whether the number you called corresponds with the correct entrant audio.

Because the phone lines are very active throughout the UK when the vote window opens, some callers may experience the engaged tone - especially those in rural/remote areas. We recommend that you call back within a couple of minutes when the traffic through your local exchange would have subsided. Engaged tones are controlled at local telephone exchanges and are something that the BBC cannot control. You can also opt to vote online via http://www.bbc.co.uk/eurovision.

If after dialling the first four numbers of the premium rate number you heard a dead tone - then this means that you are premium rate barred and you should check with your telephone service provider about lifting the ban if you wish to vote Eurovision: You Decide 2018. You can also opt to vote online via http://www.bbc.co.uk/eurovision.

Given the high volume of viewers and callers that some TV voting shows generate, it is possible for a very large number of people to pick up the phone simultaneously when the onscreen announcement is made. Sometimes this can cause some callers to get an engaged tone for short periods of time immediately after an onscreen announcement; however, any congestion tends to clear quite quickly. You can also opt to vote online via http://www.bbc.co.uk/eurovision

No method of voting offered is available outside of the UK, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.

Like all the big shows, Eurovision: You Decide 2018 uses a voting system where at least the first eight digits of the phone numbers are the same for all entrants, with only the last few digits of the phone number changing depending on who you want to vote for. As the telephone network only uses the first eight digits in a telephone number to route calls to the voting system, it is impossible for calls for different entrants to be treated differently. Once calls reach the voting system they are answered in turn, on a first-come, first-served basis. Each answering point is instructed to accept votes for all entrants; there are no dedicated answering points for individual entrants. This means that your chance of getting through to vote will never depend on the entrant you wish to vote for.

Mobile Short Dial Codes (MSDCs) are the numbers to call (not text) from UK mobile phones where callers are charged a guaranteed fixed price for the call (15p for Eurovision: You Decide 2018 voting) regardless of their UK mobile telephone service provider. The MSDC numbers are shorter than a normal telephone number, typically between 5 and 7 digits long. When MSDCs were introduced, calling the premium rate ‘09’ numbers from mobile phones resulted is a large variance in charges, dependent on the UK mobile telephone service provider. MSDCs removed that variance. Calls to the Eurovision: You Decide 2018 ‘09’ numbers, whether from a landline or mobile, cost the caller 15p plus the access charge set by the landline or mobile telephone service provider of the caller. The impact has reduced that variance in charges, made the differences public and resulted in that variance being across both landline and mobile calls. The continued use of MSDCs for voting therefore has the advantage that callers from UK mobile phone networks should pay less to vote as no access charge is applied to these calls. When voting from a UK mobile using a MSDC number you will hear a vote confirmation message in the same way you would when voting by calling a ‘09’ premium rate number from a landline.

Using your UK mobile phone, simply dial the short number shown on screen for your chosen entrant/s, when the vote is open. There is one number allocated to each entrant. If you call while the vote is open you will hear a message confirming your vote. If you try to call when the vote is closed you will hear a closed non-chargeable message. You can’t text/SMS to the MSDC.

Text voting cannot be offered for Eurovision: You Decide 2018 due to the relatively short periods in which the vote is open and during which the result needs to be provided and verified. There is the risk of potential delays within the mobile networks at busy times which could result in text votes not being received within the period the vote is open. With a phone call, if the exchange is busy you will hear an engaged tone, however with text/SMS you would not know if there is any late delivery of your vote (causing it to not be registered). There are no such potential network delays with MSDCs other than busy tones at local exchange level with heavy traffic. In addition, call attempts to MSDCs outside of the vote open period, or to numbers no longer in use, are non-chargeable to callers, unlike text where charges may still apply. The advantage of using telephone calls for voting rather than text voting is that the caller knows at the time of the call that their vote has been counted and also that they have been charged for their vote. They will also know from receiving an engaged tone if they did not get through and that they can then just press redial to try again. The same is not true of text voting as the texter has to wait for a confirmation message back from their mobile telephone service provider which may take some time to arrive or which may not arrive at all.

Voting on Eurovision: You Decide 2018 via a MSDC from UK mobile networks will cost 15p per vote.

No. Calls outside the vote open period and those made to any of Eurovision: You Decide 2018 numbers not currently in use will not be chargeable.

The Channel Islands and Isle of Man are covered by separate mobile telephone service providers who do not currently support voting by MSDCs. Viewers in these regions may still be able to vote by dialling the ‘09’ numbers for Eurovision: You Decide 2018 entrants from their landlines or mobiles at 15p plus their network’s access charge per vote.

No. MSDC voting is only available from mobile phones, if you try to call a MSDC from your landline you will not be connected to the voting service and your vote will not be counted. In a very small number of cases, the landline telephone service provider may route the call to a local destination as it may match a “local” telephone number which may result in a ‘wrong number’ call being made. Such calls would be chargeable if they are answered.

No. Eurovision: You Decide 2018 voting will be made using online and telephone call voting only as this offers the caller the benefits of knowing at the time that they place their vote that their vote has been counted and that they have been charged. This would not be true of text votes.

Yes. It will cost you 15p plus your mobile network’s access charge per vote. The ‘09’ voting numbers should preferably only be called from your landline if you have one. If using your mobile, you should call the MSDC if you can as it will be cheaper at 15p per vote. No access charge is applicable on the MSDCs. If you decide to call the ‘09’ voting numbers from your UK mobile phone then you will hear a non-chargeable message at the start of the call asking you to call the MSDCs instead. If you remain on the line after the message then you will be able to vote for your chosen entrant but your UK mobile telephone service provider will charge 15p plus the network’s access charge per call.

No, you should not receive any text messages from Eurovision: You Decide 2018 or any other organisation as a result of voting using the MSDCs. The BBC does not sell on nor, except if required to do so for legal reasons, supply mobile telephone numbers to any third party. Text spamming is caused by companies sending unsolicited text messages to mobile telephone numbers. The BBC in no way supports this practice and takes great care to guard numbers from any unauthorised use. If you receive unwanted text messages from other companies that you are being charged for, you can contact Phone-paid Services Authority, the premium services regulator on 0300 30 300 30 (standard geographic charges from landlines and mobiles will apply) between 10am and 4pm Monday to Friday (excluding Bank Holidays) or via www.psauthority.org.uk to report this.

There are a small number of UK mobile phone users who are unable to call MSDCs, you should check with your mobile telephone service provider to see if you can lift the calling bar or simply vote by calling the ‘09’ voting numbers using a landline.

Not all UK telephone service providers, including some VOIP operators, allow voting by traditional premium rate 09 numbers. The new MSDC numbers are intended only for voting via the UK mobile telephone service providers and so will almost certainly not be supported by the fixed line and VOIP telephone service providers.

The MSDCs are provided by the UK mobile telephone service providers and are only accessible via these operators. It is also unlikely that calls can be made to MSDCs from UK mobiles when these are outside of the UK, as this would be subject to mobile telephone service providers’ international roaming arrangements with foreign telephone service providers.

Only the first three (3) votes from each phone number will be counted. You may still be charged for subsequent calls. **Throughout these FAQs “UK mobile phones” means mobile phones provided in the UK under UK contracts by Vodafone, O2, Everything Everywhere (previously T Mobile and Orange), Virgin and ‘3’.

Yes.

Throughout these FAQs “UK mobile phones” means mobile phones provided in the UK under UK contracts by Vodafone, O2, Everything Everywhere (previously T Mobile and Orange), Virgin and ‘3’.

Voting online - Eurovision You Decide

BBC Helpline: 0370 010 0222 (standard geographic charges from landlines and mobiles will apply)

No, you can only vote by on the website bbc.co.uk/eurovision or by phone.

No, subject to the caps, all votes will be counted.

No. The BBC does not receive any revenue. Revenue from the calls (if any) goes to charity.

Yes

In order to cast your vote, you must sign in to your BBC account. If you do not already have a BBC account you will need to register before you can vote.

Once you have created a BBC account you are then ready to go. You are advised to login to your BBC account before the vote opens.

During the live show the presenter will let you know when the vote has opened. You will then be able to cast your vote online.

Your BBC account details can only cast one (1) vote in Eurovision: You Decide 2018.

You can vote using your mobile phone, tablet or your home computer. Online votes on different devices using the same BBC account details will count towards the maximum number of votes per account. You cannot vote via the BBC iPlayer app on your Smart TV, tablet or smart phone. Please visit bbc.co.uk/eurovision to vote where you may need to sign in again or register to cast a vote.

If you’re trying to vote but the ‘Vote Now’ button has turned grey and you’re having trouble submitting your vote then you might not actually be signed in, even if it appears that you are and you’ve been presented with the vote options. To check if you are signed in, click the BBC account profile button on the left hand side of the top bar and this should allow you to sign in correctly or alternatively go to bbc.com/signin. Once you’re signed in, head back to the Eurovision: You Decide page and continue to cast your vote.

If you have a BBC account, but can't remember your password, you'll need to reset it. You can find out how to do that here https://www.bbc.co.uk/usingthebbc/account/how-do-i-change-my-password/.

When registering for a BBC account what information do I need to give? This depends on your age. We ask everyone to provide us with your date of birth, gender and a secure password. For anyone aged 13 and over, we ask users to provide an email address, and let us know if they would like to receive emails about things they’ll love. Your email address lets you reset your password if you forget it. And it means we can get in touch if we need to tell you about something new, like a change to our terms of use. For anyone under 13 years old, we ask you to provide a username, but no email, so it’s important you remember it (as well as your password), because we won’t be able contact you. If you are 18 years or older, we ask for your postcode, and if you are under 18, we ask for your hometown. If you previously used to sign in with a username, you'll need to use your email address from now on if you are over 13. If you previously signed in with Facebook or Google+, we unfortunately do not use these platforms to sign in anymore. If you haven’t signed in to your account in the last year, then it may have been closed unless you have signed in with an email address. If that’s the case, you will need to register for a BBC account again.

We use your age, postcode/hometown and gender to give you relevant local info online and in any email newsletters you sign up for. We also use this information to ensure we are making something for everyone, as part of our public service remit. Some parts of the BBC are only meant for certain ages. We also need to know how old you are to make sure you can use the parts that are meant for you. Find out more about how we use your data here.

If you decide not to proceed with registering your BBC account then unfortunately you will not be able to cast your vote online, however, you can still always vote via phone. Just watch the show for the phone numbers or visit the website whilst the vote is open for the phone vote information.

If you click on sign in and you are already signed in to your BBC account then you will be directed to the BBC homepage or you will remain on the same page. That means you are ready to cast your vote once it opens here (bbc.co.uk/eurovision).

We have a separate page that can answer your questions around signing in to your BBC account, and also put you in touch with someone if you are unable to find the answer you need. Visit here.

We have a separate page that can answer your questions around registering for a new BBC account, and also put you in touch with someone if you are unable to find the answer you need. Visit here. If you have not used your account in a while and have forgotten your password you will need to click on the 'forgotten password' link before the show to allow enough time for a new password to be sent through. This will only be possible if you provided a valid email address when registering.

If you have any questions about your BBC account you can find some FAQs here which might help.

Yes. It will cost you 15p plus your mobile network’s access charge per vote. The ‘09’ voting numbers should preferably only be called from your landline if you have one. If using your mobile, you should call the MSDC if you can as it will be cheaper at 15p per vote. No access charge is applicable on the MSDCs. If you decide to call the ‘09’ voting numbers from your UK mobile phone then you will hear a non-chargeable message at the start of the call asking you to call the MSDCs instead. If you remain on the line after the message then you will be able to vote for your chosen entrant but your UK mobile telephone service provider will charge 15p plus the network’s access charge per call.

You can decide if you want to receive occasional emails to tell you about BBC programmes and services or not. It's completely up to you. We may personalise them based on your location and how you use the BBC online site, to help you get the most from the BBC. Find out more about the emails here. You can also unsubscribe at any time.

No, you will not be charged to vote online by visiting http://www.bbc.co.uk/eurovision during the live show. Please check your broadband or mobile contract to check the cost of using data services.