BBC Singers

The BBC Singers hold a unique position in British musical life. The choir’s virtuosity sees it performing everything from Byrd to Birtwistle, Tallis to Takemitsu. Its expertise in contemporary music has brought about creative relationships with some of the most important composers and conductors of the 20th and 21st centuries, including Britten, Maxwell Davies, Poulenc and Judith Bingham.

the BBC Singers were on luminous form
– The Daily Telegraph, April 2015

The BBC Singers’ current season at London’s Milton Court Concert Hall features a concert programmed by Sir Harrison Birtwistle and including his The Moth Requiem conducted by Martyn Brabbins, Bach’s St Matthew Passion with soloists Nicholas Mulroy and Bragi Jónsson, and an all-Handel concert led by newly-appointed Chief Conductor Designate Sofi Jeannin. A special concert in St Luke’s, Chelsea, in December features Christmas readings from Dickens by Simon Callow. The Singers at Six series of early-evening concerts in the atmospheric surroundings of St Giles’ Cripplegate continues into the 2017–18 season with music by Elgar, Finzi, Franck and Ravel.

The group makes appearances at the BBC Proms each year; concerts in the 2017 festival included music by Palestrina and Judith Weir, conducted by David Hill in Southwark Cathedral, and music on the theme of the Crucifixion conducted by Sofi Jeannin. The vast majority of its performances are broadcast on BBC Radio 3.

Based at the BBC’s Maida Vale Studios, the choir also gives free performances at St Paul’s Knightsbridge and other venues, including earlier this autumn, a concert programmed by Associate Composer Judith Weir. The BBC Singers also make regular appearances at major festivals across the UK and beyond.

The world-class ensemble is committed to sharing its enthusiasm and creative expertise through a nationwide outreach programme. This includes frequent collaborations with schoolchildren, youth choirs and the amateur choral community, as well as with the professional composers, singers and conductors of tomorrow.