Press Office

Wednesday 24 Sep 2014

Programme Information

Network TV BBC Week 36: Wednesday 7 September 2011

BBC ONE and BBC ONE HD
Wednesday 7 September 2011
www.bbc.co.uk/bbcone   www.bbc.co.uk/bbchd

National Treasures Live Ep 5/5

Live event/outside broadcast
Wednesday 7 September
7.30-8.00pm BBC ONE

Broadcast live from Wrexham, Dan Snow and Sian Williams present the final programme in the series. The team are at Erddig Hall, a stately home, where they explore the extraordinary relationship that existed between the servants and masters of the house.

Unable to conceal the servants due to the thin structure of the house, the masters instead embraced them, celebrating their lives in elaborate portraiture which remains on display to this day.

Once again, a team of reporters and the nation's favourite celebrities reveal some of the country's most mysterious, surprising and compelling stories. Tonight, Sheila Hancock explores the changing role of female spies post-Second World War and forensic anthropologist Xanthe Mallett revisits the gruesome murders by Jack the Ripper. She looks at original evidence from the case and works with a top murder detective to reveal the latest possible suspect – a merchant seaman from Germany.

National Treasures Live is part of BBC Learning's Hands on History. Details are available at bbc.co.uk/history/handsonhistory.

CD4

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Village SOS

Wednesday 7 September
8.00-9.00pm BBC ONE

At first glance, picturesque Tideswell in the Peak District may look the image of the rural idyll. But dig a bit deeper and the reality is that shops have been closing, pubs have shut and it's in danger of becoming a ghost town by day, where residents just go to sleep at night.

Pete Hawkins and a group of volunteers want to halt the decline, armed with a grant from the Big Lottery Fund and big ideas to start a cookery school and a quality mark to reflect the excellence of the local produce.

Helping them is village champion Tim Nicol, who may have expertise in marketing but finds selling his ideas for pink granite worktops don't go down too well with cookery experts.

And as presenter Sarah Beeny finds, with local shopkeepers viewing the new concern as a threat, rather than an asset, the project has an uphill mountain to climb.

JW

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