Press Office

Friday 29 Aug 2014

Programme Information

BBC ONE and BBC ONE HD
Thursday 24 March 2011
www.bbc.co.uk/bbcone   www.bbc.co.uk/bbchd

EastEnders

High Definition programme
Thursday 24 March
7.30-8.00pm BBC ONE and BBC ONE HD

Roxy likes the attention she is getting from Michael but Alfie tells her to be careful, in the latest visit to Albert Square.

Elsewhere, Max goads Jay into punching him.

Meanwhile, after hearing about Jack's business decision Ronnie is scared that her secret will be revealed, so she goes to Phil and asks for his help.

Roxy is played by Rita Simons, Michael by Steve John Shepherd, Alfie by Shane Richie, Max by Jake Wood, Jay by Jamie Borthwick, Jack by Scott Maslen, Ronnie by Samantha Womack and Phil by Steve McFadden.

EastEnders is simulcast in HD on BBC One HD on Freesat channel 108, Freeview channel 50, Sky channel 143 and Virgin Media channel 108.

AB3

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BBC TWO Thursday 24 March 2011
www.bbc.co.uk/bbctwo   www.bbc.co.uk/bbchd

Royal Upstairs Downstairs – Stoneleigh Abbey Ep 14/20

Thursday 24 March
6.30-7.00pm BBC TWO

Tim Wonnacott and Rosemary Shrager continue their exploration of the upstairs and downstairs activities of the stately homes and castles visited by Queen Victoria during her lifetime, delving into her personal diaries to find out what went on behind closed doors.

Today they are at Stoneleigh Abbey in Warwickshire, which the Queen visited in June 1858 at the age of 39 with husband Albert, 21 years into her reign. Their hosts were William Henry Leigh and his wife Caroline. There is an extraordinarily detailed account of this trip thanks to a diary kept by William's sister, Georgina. Part diary, part gossip column, it provides the perfect insight into Victoria and Albert's stay at Stoneleigh Abbey.

A problem that faced Lord and Lady Leigh during the visit was where to fit all the dinner guests. Although a large manor house, no one dining room was equipped for all the invited guests, so they chose to redress the saloon reception area, decorated with ornate plaster works depicting mythological scenes – a favourite interest of the Queen – but not grand enough to stop Her Majesty commenting on how it could be improved.

As the Victorian kitchens no longer exist at Stoneleigh, Rosemary takes to the conservatory with food historian Ivan Day to recreate one of the intricate dishes that was served to Victoria during her stay: a chocolate dessert dish, with handcrafted chocolate, finished with decorations made from sugar icing. Looking at the original menu and receipts, Rosemary and Ivan discover some of the more striking confectionary brought in for the dish, including 2lbs of pistachio nuts and a liqueur made from morello cherries called Maraschino, of which a whole pint was used to complete the recipe.

EB

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A Farmer's Life For Me Ep 8/8

Thursday 24 March
8.00-9.00pm BBC TWO

Jimmy Doherty chooses the couple who will run their own farm for a year
Jimmy Doherty chooses the couple who will run their own farm for a year

The nine couples of would-be farmers have now been whittled down to just two, who are about to go head-to-head in the final.

Self-made pig farmer Jimmy Doherty faces his toughest decision yet as he must choose who should have the chance to run their own 25-acre farm for a year. To help him make up his mind, he has come up with the farming day from hell. Each couple must undergo a daunting series of livestock and arable challenges that involve herding and shearing sheep and ploughing and seeding land. But the most difficult test of all is when the fledgling farmers must present their business plan for what they would do with the farm if they won.

Emotions run high as everyone knows any mistake at this stage could end in disaster.

RB

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The British At Work –
To Have And Have Not: 1980-1995 Ep 3/4

Thursday 24 March
9.00-10.00pm BBC TWO

Kirsty Young looks at an era marked by powerful contrasts, as the series exploring the post-war British workplace continues. For some, work meant liberation, aspiration and opportunity, while for others, it meant years of pain and disenchantment.

Kirsty highlights the emergence of a new self-employed and self-starting class eager to embrace Margaret Thatcher's message of self-reliance and the pursuit of wealth. For many people this meant exploring new job opportunities and working in new kinds of jobs.

Kirsty traces the roots of long hours and a work-stressed world to these days of chasing the dream at work, self-employment and self-realisation. Work became a passport to a different lifestyle, barriers to success collapsed and work was even tinged with a bit of glamour. The real money was made by the City of London and working hours grew longer.

But, as Kirsty describes, there was another dimension to the era. Throughout Britain, heavy traditional industries collapsed before the ruthless power of global market forces and entire communities lost stability and certainty. It was a profoundly emotional moment when millions were suddenly out of work or were forced to travel far from home in search of a job. This marked the emasculation of the workplace and a shift in power from unions to management.

The poignancy of this moment was captured in television dramas of the era, with Boys From The Blackstuff and Auf Wiedersehen, Pet cataloguing the collapse of Britain's industrial heartlands.

Kirsty explores how the speed of the revolution was also attributable to a new generation of managers. Management was now a culture as radical as trades union activism had been in the Sixties and Seventies. In 1995, trades union membership in Britain was eight million. In just 15 years, this had reduced to the same level as in 1945 – the start of our story.

The programme also looks at technologies rippling through working lives. The first generations of PCs were changing work in offices, banks and shops. They were fuelling the possibilities of the service and financial sectors and setting Britain on the road to a new kind of economy and new kinds of work.

FS

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