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29 October 2014
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Programme Information

Network Radio Week 25

Thursday 19 June 2008


BBC RADIO 2 Thursday 19 June 2008
Bob Harris Country
Thursday 19 June
7.00-8.00pm BBC RADIO 2
     

Country legend Emmylou Harris
Country legend Emmylou Harris

Special guest Emmylou Harris, one of the most influential Nashville artists of the past 40 years, joins Bob Harris tonight.

 

Emmylou performs tracks from her new album, All I Intended To Be, which has been four years in production and reunites her with former husband and producer Brian Ahern. The album features contributions from Dolly Parton, Vince Gill and Emmylou's long-time friends, Kate and Anne McGarrigle.

 

Presenter/Bob Harris, Producer/Al Booth

 

BBC Radio 2 Publicity

Theme Time Radio Hour With Bob Dylan
Thursday 19 June
11.00pm-12.00midnight BBC RADIO 2
       

There won't be a dry eye in the house, as Bob Dylan selects favourite tracks connected by the theme of tears.

 

Featured music includes: Cry To Me by Solomon Burke; I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry by Hank Williams Sr; Tears A Go-Go by Charlie Rich; and Everybody's Cryin' Mercy by Mose Allison.

 

Presenter/Bob Dylan, BBC Series Producer/Phil Hughes

 

BBC Radio 2 Publicity

 

BBC RADIO 3 Thursday 19 June 2008
Composer Of The Week Ep 4/5
Monday 16 to Friday 20 June
12.00-1.00pm BBC RADIO 3
       

Donald Macleod continues to chart the lives of Parisian composers Cécile Chaminade and Augusta Holmès, who were born a mere decade apart but whose lives and music were polar opposites.

 

The dawning of the Third Republic offered both composers useful opportunities. In Chaminade's case, the rise in amateur music-making and government support for music were beneficial in terms of sales and performances. By this time, she had a large portfolio of short piano pieces at her fingertips. This period also saw her produce her only piano sonata, a piece she appears to have written purely for herself, giving a tantalising glimpse of the rather private woman behind the music.

 

Holmès's talent for self-promotion, meanwhile, helped her secure performances for her orchestral music at a time when it was, by and large, a male musical preserve. In 1889, she secured a commission for a work to commemorate the 1789 revolution. The Ode Triomphale was nothing less than a visionary project, involving a cast of 1,200 performers, 900 singers and 300 instrumentalists.

 

Presenter/Donald Macleod, Producer/Johannah Smith

 

BBC Radio 3 Publicity

Performance On 3 – BBC Philharmonic
Thursday 19 June
7.00-8.45pm BBC RADIO 3
       

Martin Hanley introduces the final concert of Gianandrea Noseda and the BBC Philharmonic's series celebrating the symphonies of Brahms and the concertos of Schumann.

 

Brahms was introduced to the Schumann family when he was 20 years old. Robert Schumann was amazed at his talent and the pair became lifelong friends.

 

The piano leads the way in this concert, recorded last week at the Bridgewater Hall in Manchester. Louis Lortie performs Schumann's Piano Concerto, in which Florestan and Eusebius, the characters ever present in the composer's deteriorating mind, are portrayed by him musically. This is followed by another mini piano concerto: Schumann's Introduction and Allegro Appassionato. The concert ends with Brahms's final symphony, the Fourth.

 

Presenter/Martin Handley, Producer/Ellie Mant

 

BBC Radio 3 Publicity

BBC FOCUS ON CHINA
The Essay – English Takeaway Ep 4/4

Monday 16 to Thursday 19 June
11.00-11.15pm BBC RADIO 3
 

Cultural and political writer Patrick Wright explores the responses to the so-called "liberation" of mainland China in 1949, in the last of four essays that invert the dominant contemporary take on the relationship between China and Britain.

 

At one of the first meetings of the new government, Mao announced that the Chinese people had at last "stood up". This phrase resonated widely. In 1954, on the fifth anniversary of liberation, Paul Hogarth visited the country and drew a peasant standing up with a wooden pitchfork, looking just like a 17th-century Leveller from the English Revolution. But it may have been veteran artist Stanley Spencer, more often associated with the Berkshire village of Cookham than international politics, who had the greater influence on Sino-British engagement.

 

Presenter/Patrick Wright, Producer/Simon Coates

 

BBC Radio 3 Publicity

 

BBC RADIO 4 Thursday 19 June 2008
Round Britain Quiz Is 60
Thursday 19 June
11.30am-12.00noon BBC RADIO 4
       

Tom Sutcliffe uncovers the secret of the enduring popularity of BBC Radio 4's Round Britain Quiz.

 

With six decades of fiendish questions under its belt, Round Britain Quiz is the world's longest-running radio quiz. For 60 years now, participants have struggled to find connections between some of the most arcane nuggets of knowledge ever to grace the airwaves, with the likes of Irene Thomas and Eric Korn becoming broadcasting institutions in the process.

 

This programme offers a glimpse behind the scenes of the show, combining classic archive with fresh interviews in an affectionate and sometimes irreverent anniversary celebration.

 

Presenter/Tom Sutcliffe, Producer/Geoff Bird

 

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

Afternoon Play – Beijing's Slowest Elevator
Thursday 19 June
2.15-3.00pm BBC RADIO 4
       

Zhang Yan has turned her back on her rural upbringing and is determined to make it as a Beijinger, whatever the cost. The question is: how do you re-invent yourself in a city of 17 million people?

 

By night, Zhang Yan works in an upmarket karaoke bar, entertaining and sleeping with its successful business clients. Back home, squeezed into her apartment block's inefficient elevator, she encounters an attractive young man. Perhaps he will offer some way out – a point of human contact amid the isolation of Beijing's noise and bustle.

 

Beijing's Slowest Elevator is a dramatic adaptation of a specially commissioned short story from filmmaker and novelist Xiaolu Guo. Liz Sutherland stars as Zhang Yan and the cast also includes Chike Chan, Su-Lin Looi and Richard Woo. It is adapted by Penny Leicester.

 

Producer/Emma Harding

 

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

Material World
Thursday 19 June
4.00-4.30pm BBC RADIO 4
       

On 21 June 1948, Manchester University's Small-Scale Experimental Machine – or "the Baby", as it was known – ran its first-ever program, becoming the world's first stored-program electronic digital computer. With a mere 128 bytes of memory and only seven possible instructions, the machine may sound primitive by 2008's standards but the principles behind it survive in all computers to this day.

 

Before the Baby, electronic computers had to be physically rewired if they were to run more than one program. But the Baby, relying on a revolutionary random access memory system, was freely programmable, just like modern computers. Quentin Cooper is joined by two leading computer scientists to celebrate Baby's 60th anniversary and to investigate its legacy.

 

Presenter/Quentin Cooper, Producer/Peter McHugh

 

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

Circles
Thursday 19 June
8.00-8.30pm BBC RADIO 4
       

Since 2002, Circles Of Support And Accountability, a pilot scheme based in the Thames Valley/Hampshire area, has worked with police and probation officers to support sex offenders upon their release from prison. Many have abused children and are considered high-risk but, in the six years since Circles began, there have been no re-offences. The scheme is about to be rolled out nationally.

 

A Circle is a group of four or five ordinary members of the public who volunteer to meet the sex offender, or "core member", each week for a year. Initially, they meet as a group, but later they meet on a one-to-one basis and take the core member to social events.

 

This programme eavesdrops on the training for volunteers. Listeners hear from an experienced Circle member, Laurence, and meet Nzinga, a 25-year-old probation officer who is just about to join a Circle.

 

Producer/Sara Conkey

 

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

 

BBC RADIO 5 LIVE Thursday 19 June 2008
Simon Mayo
Thursday 19 June
1.00-4.00pm BBC RADIO 5 LIVE
       

Simon Mayo hosts debate on the day's big talking-points in a programme that also features coverage of the racing from Ladies' Day at Royal Ascot, where fashion is the name of the game and the key race of the day is the 3.45pm Gold Cup.

 

The programme features Cornelius Lysaght, John Hunt, Luke Harvey, former jockey Kevin Darley and comedian Kevin Day.

 

Presenter/Simon Mayo, Producers/Robin Bulloch (studio) and Jonathan Wall (Ascot)

 

BBC Radio 5 Live Publicity

5 Live Sport – Euro 2008
Thursday 19 June
7.00-10.00pm BBC RADIO 5 LIVE
     

Mark Saggers presents live coverage from Basle with all the build-up and commentary on the first Euro 2008 quarter-final. Kick-off is at 7.45pm.

 

The programme also features all the news from the third day of Royal Ascot and all the other top sports stories of the day.

 

Presenter/Mark Saggers, Producer/Steve Houghton

 

BBC Radio 5 Live Publicity

 

BBC ASIAN NETWORK Thursday 19 June 2008
Silver Street
Thursday 19 June
1.30-1.40pm BBC ASIAN NETWORK
www.bbc.co.uk/silverstreet
       

Mushtaq reassures Pervaiz that Zak will be fine when they go to Pakistan, as the Asian soap continues. He tells her that sometimes you have to let your children make their own choices.

 

Meanwhile, Arun resorts to desperate measures in his bid to get to Glastonbury. Vinnie finally puts in the call and secures four catering passes – all they have to do now is decide who comes with them. Arun reckons he can't wait to see Roopa's face when she finds out that he is going, too...

 

Mushtaq is played by Paul Bhattacharjee, Pervaiz by Shajait Khan, Arun by Naithan Ariane and Vinnie by Saikat Ahamed.

 

BBC Asian Network Publicity

 

BBC WORLD SERVICE Thursday 19 June 2008
Assignment – Dominican Baseball Players
Thursday 19 June
10.05-10.30am BBC WORLD SERVICE
       

Fifteen per cent of Major League Baseball (MLB) players in the USA come from the Dominican Republic. David Goldblatt investigates how this small country has come to dominate the MLB and explores its impact both on the culture of baseball – the most American of all sports – and on those back home, as thousands attempt to break into the big time in the USA.

 

Presenter/David Goldblatt, Producer/tbc

 

BBC World Service Publicity



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