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Wednesday 29 Oct 2014

Programme Information

Network Radio BBC Week 44: Tuesday 1 November 2011

BBC RADIO 2 Tuesday 1 November 2011
www.bbc.co.uk/radio2

Jamie Cullum's Jazz Show

Tuesday 1 November
7.00-8.00pm BBC RADIO 2

Jamie Cullum plays an hour of jazz music past and present. This week British pianist and composer Zoe Rahman, whose work Jamie follows and admires, performs tunes from her forthcoming album Kindred Spirits. Zoe Rahman has previously worked with Courtney Pine and Clark Tracey's New Quintet and is currently touring with her own quartet.

Presenter/Jamie Cullum, Producer/Karen Pearson for Folded Wing

BBC Radio 2 Publicity

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The Royal Albert Hall Ep 1/2

New series
Tuesday 1 November
10.00-11.00pm BBC RADIO 2

Charles Hazlewood looks back at how London's Royal Albert Hall has entertained the world throughout its 140-year history. The London venue has attracted the biggest names in rock, the first sumo tournament to be held outside Japan and is, of course, home to the BBC Proms.

Contributions come from Sir Cliff Richard, Katherine Jenkins, Neil Sedaka, Michael Ball, Eddie Izzard, John Bishop, Aled Jones, Hayley Westenra, Alfie Boe, Russell Watson and Jools Holland.

Highlights include Harvey Goldsmith revealing how he convinced Cirque du Soleil to abandon their tent and take up residency and Sir Michael Parkinson explaining the mysterious disappearance of Sir John Mills. Mike Batt and Jeff Wayne talks about why the Hall was the perfect place for concert versions of their albums and former-cricketer-turned-musician Mark Butcher wonders if he is the only person in the world to have performed at Lord's and the Royal Albert Hall.

Presenter/Charles Hazlewood, Producer/Neil Rosser for the BBC

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BBC RADIO 3 Tuesday 1 November 2011
www.bbc.co.uk/radio3

Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert

Tuesday 1 November
1.00-2.00pm BBC RADIO 3

This week's Lunchtime Concerts come from the Frick Collection gallery in New York, which hosts an annual season of chamber music recitals.

In the first concert of the week, pianist Nelson Goerner plays music by Chopin and Schumann, including his Symphonic Etudes. This is followed tomorrow by a performance by violinist Thomas Zehetmair of solo pieces by JS Bach and Karl Amadeus Hartmann.

Producer/Lindsay Kemp

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Radio 3 Live In Concert – Weber And Schubert With
The Orchestra Of The Age Of Enlightenment

Live event/outside broadcast
Tuesday 1 November
7.00-9.30pm BBC RADIO 3

The Orchestra Of The Age Of Enlightenment plays Haydn, Weber and Schubert in a concert live from the Queen Elizabeth Hall, London, conducted by Frans Bruggen.

Opening with Haydn's Symphony No. 60, which began life as incidental music to a play, the concert moves on to Weber's Concertino For Horn And Symphony No. 2, and Schubert's Symphony No. 5.

Presenter/Petroc Trelawny, Producer/Janet Tuppen

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BBC RADIO 4 Tuesday 1 November 2011
www.bbc.co.uk/radio4

The Life Scientific Ep 4/12

Tuesday 1 November
9.00-9.30am BBC RADIO 4

Jim Al-Khalili talks to Professor Sir Michael Marmot about his work on how stress kills.

As a junior doctor Marmot decided that medicine was failed prevention and went on to discover what he calls "Status Syndrome".

He says that to really understand disease, one must look at the society in which people live. His major discovery came from following the health of British civil servants over many years.

The Whitehall Studies challenged the myth about executive stress and instead revealed that, far from being "tough at the top", it was in fact much tougher for those lower down the pecking order.

Mortality rates were three times higher for those at the bottom than for those at the top. And this isn't confined to civil servants or to the UK, it is a global phenomenon.

In conversation with Jim, Michael reveals what inspires and motivates his work.

Presenter/Jim Al-Khalili, Producers/Anna Buckley and Geraldine Fitzgerald for the BBC

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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Angels In The North

Tuesday 1 November
11.30am-12.00noon BBC RADIO 4

Gabrielle Drake explores the development and future of regional theatre in Britain through the success story of the Royal Exchange Theatre in Manchester.

In the early Seventies, five of Britain's leading artistic directors had a vision. Tired of regional theatregoers being treated as second-class citizens, they wanted to breathe life into the country's cultural landscape. They wanted to create a theatre outside London with national standards.

From humble beginnings Manchester's Royal Exchange Theatre opened in 1976.

In this programme, actress Gabrielle Drake speaks to founding Artistic Director Braham Murray about the success of the theatre over its 35-year history and the effect the theatre has had on the region.

The programme includes The Guardian theatre critic Lyn Gardner, Artistic Director of Manchester's Library Theatre Chris Honer and Professor of Theatre Tony Jackson.

Presenter/Gabrielle Drake, Producer/Elizabeth Foster for the BBC

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Nudge Psychology vs Nanny State – An All In The Mind Special

Tuesday 1 November
9.00-9.30pm BBC RADIO 4

The UK boasts the world's first Behavioural Insight Team, or "Nudge Unit", designed to persuade people into making decisions which are good for them. Claudia Hammond investigates if it can really work.

Nudge was the best-selling book that David Cameron famously ordered his shadow cabinet to read over their summer holidays. The previous Labour government had already shown some interest in the new science of behavioural economics, but Prime Minister Cameron put the ideas of University of Chicago behavioural economist, David Thaler, at the heart of his government, and set up the world's first Behavioural Insight Team, or Nudge Unit.

Claudia talks to the Behavioural Insight Team about where they believe they can really make a difference.

She also hears from critics, sceptical that evidence of individual behaviour change can be extrapolated to whole populations when it comes to the most serious problems in our society.

Presenter/Claudia Hammond, Producer/Fiona Hill for the BBC

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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Warhorses Of Letters Ep 2/4

Tuesday 1 November
11.00-11.15pm BBC RADIO 4

Stephen Fry stars as Napoleon's horse, Marengo, and Daniel Rigby as Wellington's horse, Copenhagen, in a love story of two horses separated by war.

The story is told through their letters to each other.

The second episode of this four part series sees Copenhagen becoming a warhorse, and Marengo setting out into the vast Russian Steppe as he carries Napoleon at the head of his vast army towards Moscow.

As uncertainty and conflict beset the pair, it puts strains on their new relationship, especially when Copenhagen begins to explore his physical side with quite a lot of other horses, and things begin to go less well for the French army and its horses as winter sets in.

Warhorses Of Letters is written by novelists Robert Hudson and Marie Phillips.

Director/Steven Canny, Producer/Gareth Edwards for the BBC

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BBC RADIO 5 LIVE Tuesday 1 November 2011
www.bbc.co.uk/5live

5 Live Sport

Live event/outside broadcast
Tuesday 1 November
7.00-10.30pm BBC RADIO 5 LIVE

Mark Pougatch has the day's big sporting headlines, and build-up to the evening's Champions League action.

From 7.45pm there's live Champions League group-stage football commentary on Arsenal versus Marseille, plus regular updates on Genk versus Chelsea.

At 9.40pm there's post-match reaction to the evening's Champions League football in Final Whistle.

Presenter/Mark Pougatch, Producer/Mike Carr

BBC Radio 5 Live Publicity

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BBC RADIO 6 MUSIC Tuesday 1 November 2011
www.bbc.co.uk/6music

Shaun Keaveny

Tuesday 1 November
7.00-10.00am BBC RADIO 6 MUSIC

Shaun Keaveny welcomes one of the world's most unique and critically acclaimed magicians into the studio. Bradford-born Dynamo is just an ordinary boy who travels the globe astounding everyone he meets from international footballers to the Hollywood glitterati with his amazing magic tricks.

He joins Shaun to chat about his success, and gives listeners tips on how to impress their friends with simple magic tricks.

Presenter/Shaun Keaveny, Producer/Lisa Kenlock

BBC Radio 6 Music Publicity

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BBC RADIO 6 MUSIC'S SALFORD SEASON
Craig Charles

Tuesday 1 November
1.00-4.00pm BBC RADIO 6 MUSIC

Craig Charles is next in the weekday hot seat with a smattering of funk, soul and tomfoolery for a Tuesday afternoon. Regular listeners to his show enjoy classic tracks from James Brown, Wanda Jackson, Quincy Jones, Frankie Beverley and Cheryl Lynn.

Presenter/Craig Charles, Producer/Lizzie Hoskin

BBC Radio 6 Music Publicity

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Marc Riley

Tuesday 1 November
7.00-9.00pm BBC RADIO 6 MUSIC

Heading down from the sunny Highlands is the one the only Jonnie Common for his debut live session for Marc Riley.

Formerly of Down The Tiny Steps and Inspector Tapehead, Jonnie Common is busy touring around these fine isles with his Red Deer Club records release Master Of None. With equal parts folksy charm and electro bleeping, Mr Common creates a beautiful and unique sound.

Presenter/Marc Riley, Producer/Michelle Choudhry

BBC Radio 6 Music Publicity

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BBC RADIO 6 MUSIC'S SALFORD SEASON
Oasis – What's The Story? Ep 1/2

Tuesday 1 November
12.00midnight-12.30am BBC RADIO 6 MUSIC

Mark Radcliffe takes a canny look at the trials and tribulations of the Gallagher brothers and one of the biggest British bands of all time.

The documentary looks at their beginnings as Rain, to playing stadiums and the constant rivalry between band members and the brothers in between. The programme includes interviews with the band and Alan McGee, boss of Creation Records.

Presenter/Mark Radcliffe, Producer/Frank Wilson

BBC Radio 6 Music Publicity

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BBC WORLD SERVICE Tuesday 1 November 2011
www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice

The Dark Side Of Diplomacy Ep 1/2

New series
Tuesday 1 November
8.00-8.30pm BBC WORLD SERVICE

Diplomacy is often presented as an art form, the peak of civilisation in a barren political world. But what happens when it is conducted with torturers, murderers and serial human rights abusers?

In this two-part series, Lyse Doucet speaks to the politicians, diplomats and activists who have had to deal with the some of the darker characters in modern history– from Saddam Hussein to Slobodan Milosevic – and how they coped with it.

The programme looks at how these diplomats operated, and questions how they separated emotion from the need to conduct business. It also considers what happened when they found themselves actually liking the person even while abhorring their behaviour.

Issues of compromise and complicity are also examined, and the programme questions if engagement is always better than isolation, even in the case of tyrannical regimes.

Presenter/Lyse Doucet

BBC World Service Publicity

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