Press Office

Thursday 27 Nov 2014

Programme Information

BBC RADIO 2 Wednesday 3 November 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/radio2

The Mike Harding Show

Wednesday 3 November
7.00-8.00pm BBC RADIO 2

Mike Harding presents an hour of the very best in folk, roots and acoustic music. This week, the entire programme is devoted to listeners' requests.

Presenter/Mike Harding, Producer/Kellie While for Smooth Operations

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Radcliffe And Maconie

Wednesday 3 November
8.00-10.00pm BBC RADIO 2

Legendary producer and ex-member of Roxy Music Brian Eno chats to Mark Radcliffe and Stuart Maconie about his new work on Warp Records.

Presenters/Mark Radcliffe and Stuart Maconie, Producer/Lizzie Hoskin for Smooth Operations

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Jazz Junctions Ep 5/10

Wednesday 3 November
10.00-11.00pm BBC RADIO 2

Guy Barker continues to explore the history of jazz, focusing on the turning points and pivotal events that have shaped the genre, and discovering some great stories and larger-than-life characters along the way.

In part five, entitled The Night We Called It A Day – Frank Sinatra And The Sing Era, Guy Barker examines the collapse of the big bands and the rise of the singers as the Swing Era ended and the Sing Era began.

In January 1942, Frank Sinatra had been the featured singer with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra for two years. During that time his popularity had taken off and he realised that in order to capitalise on this he had to break away from Dorsey and launch his solo career. The defining moment came on 20 September 1942. Sinatra left Dorsey and went on to record-breaking success at the Paramount Theatre in New York, originally supporting and then overtaking Benny Goodman, the King of Swing, as top of the bill – much to Goodman's confusion.

It was the beginning of the end of the Swing Era and the start of the Sing Era. Sinatra's timing was perfect; America was at war and the wives and girlfriends of the departed GIs wanted a target for their emotions. Sinatra was it. The war, coupled with the disastrous two-year Musicians' Union recording ban, started a tail-spin for the big bands, leaving the door wide open for the singers they had helped to create. Frank Sinatra, Dick Haymes and dozens more singers were allowed to make records with vocal backings. And, as the back catalogue of big band records ran out, the singers flooded the charts, sealing the fate of the big bands. The bands' demise was astonishing in its speed. In 1945 the big band scene was booming, but by the end of 1947 it was dead.

Guy examines the collapse of the big bands and the rise of the singers via brand new interviews with Frank Foster, Louise Tobin, Buddy DeFranco, George Avakian, Terry Gibbs, Dave Brubeck, Scott Yanow, Ira Gitler, Dame Cleo Laine and Bruce Boyd Raeburn, alongside archive of Sammy Cahn, Nat "King" Cole and John Hammond.

Presenter/Guy Barker, Producer/Patrick Johns for Ping Productions

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BBC RADIO 3 Wednesday 3 November 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/radio3

Performance On 3 – The London Philharmonic Orchestra

Wednesday 3 November
6.00-9.30pm BBC RADIO 3

One of the leading pianists of the younger generation; Leif Ove Andsnes
One of the leading pianists of the younger generation; Leif Ove Andsnes

Petroc Trelawny presents a concert by the London Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by its dynamic principal conductor, Vladimir Jurowski, and featuring one of the leading pianists of the younger generation, Leif Ove Andsnes. They perform Brahms's Piano Concerto No. 2 and Beethoven's Symphony No. 3 in E flat, Eroica, retouched by Mahler.

Decades after his death Beethoven was still the most important artist around. The scale and declamation of his Third Symphony could be readily detected in the symphonies and symphony-like concertos of Brahms. The second of Brahms's Piano Concertos was the biggest since Beethoven's Emperor – a piece marked out by maturity and skill but itself displaying heroism, virtuosity and Romantic depth.

Mahler acted purely on artistic conviction when he retouched Beethoven's symphony; instruments, concert halls and audiences had changed, and Mahler invested Beethoven's minute detail with the strength – in 1890s Vienna – to enter everyone's ears.

Presenter/Peter Trelawny, Producer/Peter Thresh

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BBC RADIO 4 Wednesday 3 November 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/radio4

Doc Martens At 50

Wednesday 3 November
11.00-11.30am BBC RADIO 4

An iconic pair of boots turns 50 this year: the Doc Martens. Sarfraz Manzoor tells a story which weaves through British politics, fashion and music.

Originally designed as practical footwear for workers such as postmen or policemen, Doc Martens were to capture the imagination of the many waves of British youth. As they were adopted by different subcultures across the UK, they came to represent what it meant to be young, urban and British in the Sixties, Seventies and Eighties. Even today they retain their popularity and prized status, one of the few things still worn despite all changes in fashion and youth culture.

In the programme, Pete Townshend, one of the first people to wear Doc Martens on stage, in 1967, reflects on what they meant to him. Sarfraz also meets with members of the band Madness, speaking to them about their use of Doc Martens and the skinhead following that came in their wake in the Eighties. Sarfraz also meets an unexpected fan of the boots in Tony Benn, who valued the fact that they were so tough when he went on many political marches.

Presenter/Sarfraz Manzoor, Producer/Mark Rickards for the BBC

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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The AA Bible

Wednesday 3 November
8.45-9.00pm BBC RADIO 4

For millions of alcoholics around the world, the basic text of Alcoholics Anonymous – informally known as the Big Book – is the Bible. John Sutherland delves into it.

After being hidden away for nearly 70 years the original manuscript by AA co-founder Bill Wilson is about to become public for the first time, complete with evidence of re-writes that reveal a profound debate in 1939 about how overtly to talk about God.

Literary critic John Sutherland, himself a member of AA and a distinguished textual analyst, turns his textual critic's eye to the Wilson manuscript.

Presenter/John Sutherland, Producer/David Stenhouse for the BBC

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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Frontiers Ep 1/6

New series
Wednesday 3 November
9.00-9.30pm BBC RADIO 4

Geoff Watts investigates a new cancer drug that has had dramatic results in a previously almost untreatable type of skin cancer, as the series exploring new ideas in science and meeting the researchers responsible returns.

The molecule PLX 4032 has been shown to dramatically shrink tumours in people with a type of skin cancer whose prognosis was previously very poor. Melanomas can be treated successfully by surgical removal if caught early enough but once tumours have spread to other parts of the body, metastatic melanoma is notoriously hard to treat. The current chemotherapy treatment hasn't been improved since the Seventies and only shrinks tumours in 10-15 per cent of patients.

The drug isn't on the market yet and is still going through the process of more clinical trials, but it could, once trials are finished, spell a sea change in the treatment of skin cancer. The programme asks if this kind of drug could pave the way for more personalised medicine in the treatment of other, more common cancers and what impact this will have for patients.

Presenter/Geoff Watts, Producer/Pamela Rutherford for the BBC

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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BBC RADIO 5 LIVE Wednesday 3 November 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/5live

5 Live Sport

Live event/outside broadcast
Wednesday 3 November
7.00-10.30pm BBC RADIO 5 LIVE

Mark Pougatch presents coverage of the day's sports news, along with build-up to tonight's Champions League action.

From 7.45pm there's live Champions League group stage coverage of Chelsea versus Spartak Moscow and Shakhtar Donetsk versus Arsenal.

Presenter/Mark Pougatch, Producer/Mike Carr

BBC Radio 5 Live Publicity

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BBC 6 MUSIC Wednesday 3 November 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/6music

Marc Riley

Wednesday 3 November
7.00-9.00pm BBC 6 MUSIC

After an on-air appeal from Marc Riley, Ultrasound are finally in the BBC 6 Music Manchester studios for a live session.

Ultrasound were part of the Britpop movement but split at the end of the Nineties, not speaking to each other for the next decade. After being asked to reform for a benefit gig to raise money for Tim Smith (from the Cardiacs) they duly did ... and the rest, as they say, is now history. The band are back gigging and recording new material.

Ultrasound are currently rehearsing and writing material for a new album. The band are guitarist Andrew Wood, main songwriter Richard Green, drummer Andy Peace, keyboardist Matt Jones and bassist/vox Vanessa Best.

Presenter/Marc Riley, Producer/Michelle Choudhry

BBC 6 Music Publicity

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Gideon Coe

Wednesday 3 November
9.00pm-12.00midnight BBC 6 MUSIC

Gideon Coe digs deep to play archive gems from Neil Young, performing at 1993's Phoenix Festival, and veteran dirt-rockers Motorhead. Session tracks come from South Wales indie pioneers (and Kurt Cobain favourites) Young Marble Giants and Tamworth-born space rocker Julian Cope, with goth-punk cabaret from The Damned.

Presenter/Gideon Coe, Producer/Mark Sheldon

BBC 6 Music Publicity

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BBC ASIAN NETWORK Wednesday 3 November 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/asiannetwork

BBC Asian Network Presents... Ping Pong

Wednesday 3 November
6.00-6.30pm BBC ASIAN NETWORK

The BBC Asian Network's monthly drama strand continues with Ping Pong.

In the third of the network's new 30-minute dramas, nine-year-old Anil finds out how hard life is when he doesn't achieve the academic expectations of his parents. Feeling the pressure from his mother and father, and from the child prodigies who live in the local neighbourhood and outshine him at school, Anil worries about his aspirations for his future career. What he lives for is ping pong – encouraged only by his Thakuma (grandmother), a former West Bengal table tennis champion.

When the tension in the family builds up, a tournament away from home is too exciting to resist and for more than one reason – Anil has to face it without his beloved Thakuma. So begins a youthful road movie, and a family saga.

This month's drama, written by Sonali Bhattacharyya, features guest appearances by Nitin Ganatra (EastEnders) and Indira Joshi (The Kumars At No. 42) and introduces Joseph Samrai in the central role of nine-year-old Anil Sengupta. Other cast members include Zita Sattar as Sushmita, Saffron Mattu as Maya, Haris Nabi as Ivan, Susan Jeffrey as Deirdra, Greg Hobbs as DC Sizemore, Sean Connolly as the Commentator and Peter Neenan as the Reporter.

BBC Asian Network Presents... is the network's new drama strand, which sees a single 30-minute drama broadcast at 6pm on the first Wednesday of each month. The strand produces distinctive, original and impactful content, all relevant to the target audience. Covering a range of stories and styles, the strand also endeavours to deliver bigger, established names to the network and is committed to developing new talent both on and off air, providing a platform for budding writers and fresh radio talent.

Producer/James Peries

BBC Asian Network Publicity

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BBC WORLD SERVICE Wednesday 3 November 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice

Bagdad Boy Ep 1/2

New series
Wednesday 3 November
8.00-8.30pm BBC WORLD SERVICE

Ali Abbas became a poignant symbol of the war in Iraq when he lost both his arms and 16 members of his family in a night-time rocket attack during the United States' invasion of 2003. Now 19, he's lived on and off in the UK since he was 12. In the first episode of this two-part series the BBC's Hugh Sykes reflects on Ali's life in the UK. In programme two, he catches up with Ali as he visits his family in Baghdad.

Now considering returning to Iraq permanently, and with his family looking to arrange a marriage, it's time for Ali to become an adult, but with his childhood stolen, adapting is a struggle and his future is uncertain.

Presenter/Hugh Sykes

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Exchanges At the Frontier Ep 2/5

Wednesday 3 November
8.30-9.00pm BBC WORLD SERVICE

Philosopher AC Grayling meets with Kenya-based malaria pioneer Professor Kevin Marsh, as he continues his series meeting some of the leading figures of world science.

Professor Marsh and his team at the Kemri Wellcome programme have mapped the DNA of the malaria mosquito and identified immune responses to the disease. Grayling asks what relevance their work has to modern society and whether the public has the right to expect science to solve the problems that society creates.

Presenter/AC Grayling

BBC World Service Publicity

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