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Wednesday 29 Oct 2014

Programme Information

Network Radio BBC Week 22: Bank Holiday Monday 31 May 2010

BBC RADIO 1 Bank Holiday Monday 31 May 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/radio1

Ten-Hour Takeover British Forces Request Special

Live event/outside broadcast
Bank Holiday Monday 31 May
9.00am-7.00pm BBC RADIO 1

BBC Radio 1 broadcasts live from a British military base in Afghanistan for a Ten-Hour Takeover British Forces Request Special this Bank Holiday.

Live segments are featured during daytime shows from 9am-7pm, with a longer simulcast during Fearne Cotton and Greg James's shows between 12noon and 2pm.

Soldiers based abroad will have the opportunity to request songs and broadcast messages to friends and family back home, as BBC Radio 1 teams up with BFBS (British Forces Broadcasting Service) Radio in Camp Bastion, the main base for British troops in Afghanistan.

In a first for both stations, a BBC Radio 1 producer is working at the camp for a week, chatting to soldiers and joining BFBS presenters and producers to create content to be broadcast throughout the day.

BFBS presenters Richard Hatch and Jessie Aru anchor the broadcasts from the local Afghanistan-based station, and a podcast featuring all the day's segments will be aired across the BFBS network.

Visual content is also available online at bbc.co.uk/radio1.

Presenters/Richard Hatch and Jessie Aru

BBC Radio 1 Publicity

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BBC Radio 1 Stories – In New Movies We Trust: Cannes

Bank Holiday Monday 31 May
9.00-10.00pm BBC RADIO 1

James King heads behind the scenes of the world's most famous film festival. He rubs shoulders with the movers and shakers and takes a look at the glitz and glamour from the perspective of a group of independent British film-makers hoping to secure a distribution deal for their project.

BBC Radio 1 Stories explore the musical back-stories of listeners' favourite artists, eras, genres and scenes. Previous programmes in the series have included International Radio 1, Art Of Noise, Life In Jail and The A-Z Of Vampire Weekend.

Presenter/James King, Producers/Louise Katterhorn and Alice Lloyd

BBC Radio 1 Publicity

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BBC RADIO 2 Bank Holiday Monday 31 May 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/radio2

BBC RADIO 2'S 60S SEASON
The Top 60 Best-Selling Records Of The 60s

Bank Holiday Monday 31 May
10.00am-2.00pm BBC RADIO 2

Veteran British DJ Tony Blackburn
Veteran British DJ Tony Blackburn

Tony Blackburn counts down the best-selling singles of the Sixties in a chart specially compiled for BBC Radio 2.

Listeners can expect The Beatles and the Rolling Stones to crop up more than once, alongside a couple of crooners, a few instrumentals and even the odd one-hit wonder, in a chart that throws up some genuine surprises.

Alongside the music, the programme revisits some of the big news stories of the era, with original archive recordings of events that defined the decade.

This programme is part of BBC Radio 2's 60s Season, which marks the 50th anniversary of the start of the decade that changed the UK and the world for ever.

Presenter/Tony Blackburn, Producer/Phil Swern

BBC Radio 2 Publicity

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Jagger's Jukebox

Bank Holiday Monday 31 May
2.00-4.00pm BBC RADIO 2

Rolling Stones front-man Mick Jagger
Rolling Stones front-man Mick Jagger

The Rolling Stones front-man Mick Jagger exclusively picks a selection of artists and music that influenced the band's ground-breaking sound, in particular their classic 1972 album Exile On Main Street, which is widely recognised as one of the seminal albums of the Seventies.

In conversation with Paul Sexton, Jagger talks through a wide-ranging and revealing playlist that reflects his own, and the band's, love of classic R&B, gospel, country and reggae.

The fascinating mix of material conjures up the musical environment of the late Sixties and the turn of the Seventies, a time during which The Stones, and so many of their peers, were scaling new and ever more eclectic creative heights.

In a show that features both vintage hits and lesser-known gems, listeners discover which of the band's fellow rock acts from that era have Jagger's personal seal of approval. It features some brilliant soul records that have remained his all-time favourites, his singer-songwriters of choice, some giants of country and Americana and much more.

Jagger's Jukebox follows BBC Radio 2's documentary Exile Of The Stones (Wednesday 19 May), which told the story behind the band's 1972 album.

Presenter and Producer/Paul Sexton

BBC Radio 2 Publicity

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Richard Madeley

Bank Holiday Monday 31 May
4.00-7.00pm BBC RADIO 2

Richard Madeley sits in for Simon Mayo and is joined by Katie Melua, who performs for BBC Radio 2's Great British Songbook Library.

The Georgia-born singer reached the top of the UK Album Chart with her debut album and was Britain's best-selling female artist in 2006. Her fourth album, entitled The House, marks a new phase in Katie's musical career. It is produced by William Orbit, best known for his dance remixes and work with Madonna, and sees Katie writing on her own, as well as with Guy Chambers, Polly Scattergood and her long-time collaborator Mike Batt.

Presenter/Richard Madeley, Producer/Carmela Di Clemente

BBC Radio 2 Publicity

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BBC RADIO 2'S 60S SEASON
The British Invasion

Bank Holiday Monday 31 May
10.00-11.00pm BBC RADIO 2

Three bands influenced rock legend Alice Cooper above all others: The Yardbirds, The Kinks and The Who. All of them were British. In this documentary, broadcast as part of BBC Radio 2's 60s Season, Alice tells the story of how The Beatles' triumphant arrival in New York City on 7 February 1964 opened the doors for the "British Invasion" and changed American music for ever.

Between 1964 and 1966, Britain sent a stream of hits across the Atlantic. Following the Fab Four, Gerry And The Pacemakers, The Dave Clark Five, The Animals, Manfred Mann, Petula Clark, Freddie And The Dreamers, Herman's Hermits, the Rolling Stones and The Troggs all topped the Billboard Singles Chart.

These invaders had borrowed American rock music and returned it, restyled and refreshed. After the drab post-war years, it was suddenly cool to be a Brit. American groups emerged who dressed and sounded just like British bands, among them The Beau Brummels, The Buckinghams and, most famously, The Monkees.

The invasion established the UK record industry as one of the biggest in the world, as well as the idea of rock acts composing their own tunes. But it lasted only a couple of years. John Lennon's infamous comment that The Beatles were bigger than Jesus was the first nail in the coffin.

The British Invasion captures this exciting time in British music from a US point of view, with contributions from those who witnessed it first hand, including The Beatles' road manager Tony Bramwell and legendary documentary maker Albert Maysles, copycat bands such as The Buckinghams and some of the "invaders" themselves, Gerry Marsden, Petula Clark, Peter Noone from Herman's Hermits, Reg Presley from The Troggs, Lenny Davidson from The Dave Clark Five, The Hollies and Mike Pender from The Searchers.

Presenter/Alice Cooper, Producer/Simon Barnard

BBC Radio 2 Publicity

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BBC RADIO 3 Bank Holiday Monday 31 May 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/radio3

OPERA ON THE BBC
Composer Of The Week – Scarlatti

Bank Holiday Monday 31 May to Friday 4 June
12.00noon-1.00pm BBC RADIO 3

Alessandro Scarlatti is considered the founder of Neapolitan opera. This year marks 350 years since the composer's birth and, as part of the Opera On The BBC season, Donald Macleod surveys Scarlatti's life and music.

Although he came from humble beginnings, Scarlatti rose to claim the patronage of princes, queens and cardinals. Knighted by the Pope, he also joined the elite Arcadian Academy, with prominence over other composers such as Corelli.

Largely overshadowed in recent years by his son, Domenico, Scarlatti once dominated the international stage. Not only did he claim to have composed 114 operas, it is also believed that he composed more than 700 cantatas and nearly 40 oratorios, along with many instrumental works. Donald appraises Scarlatti's legacy and asks whether his importance should be re-evaluated.

Presenter/Donald Macleod, Producer/Luke Whitlock

BBC Radio 3 Publicity

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Performance On 3

Bank Holiday Monday 31 May
7.00-9.15pm BBC RADIO 3

Conductor Sir Mark Elder
Conductor Sir Mark Elder

Sir Mark Elder conducts the Hallé Orchestra in Mahler's Ninth Symphony, preceded by the world première of Luke Bedford's At Three And Two.

"My time has not yet come", said Mahler. This performance of the valedictory Ninth Symphony marks the end of the Hallé's contribution to the complete cycle of Mahler's Symphonies being staged by them in conjunction with the BBC Philharmonic.

Seen as Mahler's farewell to the world, the great conductor, Herbert von Karajan described Symphony No. 9 as "music from another world, coming as if from eternity".

Luke Bedford is one of today's leading young composers. His previous Hallé première, the distinctive and expressive Rode With Darkness, won the BBC Radio 3 Listeners' Award at the British Composers' Awards. Tonight listeners can hear his latest work, At Three And Two.

Presenter/Ian Skelly, Producer/Anthony Sellors

BBC Radio 3 Publicity

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OPERA ON THE BBC
The Essay – A Passion For Opera

Bank Holiday Monday 31 May to Friday 4 June
11.00-11.15pm BBC RADIO 3

Five people whose lives have been shaped by opera describe the various ways in which they have interacted with the operatic world – as critics, performers and commentators. In the opening programme, reviewer Tom Sutcliffe argues for the relevance of opera.

Later in the week, Michael Chance, one of the world's foremost counter-tenors, ponders the life of an itinerant performer, while critic Robert Thicknesse wrestles with the operatic demons that tell him that it's all a lot of nonsense.

Editor of Opera Now Magazine, Ashutosh Khandekar, recounts his entry into the opera world via student opera. To bring down the curtain on the week, Matt Peacock, the originator of Streetwise Opera, reflects on the way in which opera has changed the lives of people he has met through his work with the homeless.

Presenter/Tom Sutcliffe, Producers/Sarah Taylor and Tom Alban

BBC Radio 3 Publicity

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BBC RADIO 4 Bank Holiday Monday 31 May 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/radio4

A History Of The World – Seated Buddha From Gandhara

Bank Holiday Monday 31 May to Friday 4 June
9.45-10.00am BBC RADIO 4

Neil MacGregor, director of the British Museum, continues his historic exploration through the Museum's objects, this week turning his attention to how religions created images to express the divine.

In the opening programme, Neil explores how a stone sculpture from modern-day Pakistan reveals how Buddhism set about creating the classic image representing the real-life Buddha who lived and roamed around North India in the 5th century BC. It took more than 500 years for the classic seated image of the Buddha to emerge; before that, the Buddha was represented only by symbols.

Neil investigates how the image came about and asks if and why people need such images. He hears from the Dalai Lama's official translator, Thupten Jinpa, and historian Claudine Bautze-Picron.

Presenter/Neil MacGregor, Producers/Philip Sellars, Paul Kobrak, Anthony Denselow and Jane Lewis

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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Still Points, Turning Worlds

Bank Holiday Monday 31 May
11.00-11.30am BBC RADIO 4

Alan Hall explores daydreaming and how it provides an escape from the world around us.

Alan embroiders together the experiences of a range of people for whom still points and daydreaming provide an escape from the increasingly invasive nature of the turning world.

A century ago, in his poem Leisure, WH Davies wrote: "A poor life this if, full of care, we have no time to stand and stare." He could never have envisaged today's digital world and the vast number of stimuli and demands that sap humanity's powers of concentration.

As he relishes moments of reverie in an attempt to reclaim the powers of concentration, Alan hears from a canon at St Paul's in the heart of the City of London, an installer of "energy pods" that offer "corporate fatigue solutions", a hypnotherapist and an educational psychologist, as well as from a singer-songwriter from the world of pop music who relishes the peace of the countryside.

Presenter and Producer/Alan Hall

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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Clare In The Community – Liar, Liar, Pants On Fire Ep 1/6

New series
Bank Holiday Monday 31 May
11.30am-12.00noon BBC RADIO 4

Sally Phillips returns for a new series of the Sony Award-winning comedy as social worker Clare Barker.

Since the last series, society itself has improved little, so there are still plenty of challenges out there for an involved, caring social worker. Or even Clare.

A control freak, Clare enjoys nothing more than interfering in other people's lives on both a professional and personal basis. She is in her thirties, white, middle-class and heterosexual, all of which are occasional causes of discomfort to her, and each week sees her continue to struggle to control both her professional and private lives.

The last series saw Clare's team shaken around and shuffled about but most are present and correct for a further round of frustration, despair, disappointment, team meetings and 11 o'clock cakes at the Sparrowhawk Family Centre.

In the opening episode, Clare is now acting team leader at the Family Centre, as Irene has job-swapped. And while Irene is in Melbourne, the team is joined by Australian lesbian, Libby.

Written by Harry Venning and David Ramsden, Clare In The Community stars Sally Phillips as Clare, with Alex Lowe as Brian, Nina Conti as both Megan and Nali, Richard Lumsden as Ray, Liza Tarbuck as Helen and Sarah Kendall as Libby.

Producer/Katie Tyrrell

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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Britain's Labs Ep 1/5

New series
Bank Holiday Monday 31 May to Friday 4 June
3.45-4.00pm BBC RADIO 4

Professor Iain Stewart takes listeners inside some of Britain's leading laboratories in this week of programmes.

He begins at the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) in Sutton, Surrey. The laboratory grew out of the Royal Marsden Hospital, with which it shares a site, and the two work closely together.

The ICR is one of the main centres for the investigation of the genetic causes and possible cures or remedies for cancer. The effort is going into identifying the genetic drivers for the disease and then finding a way to turn these off. The laboratory's work has been accelerated by the completion of the Human Genome Project and by information technology which allows researchers to sift through genetic data at unprecedented speed.

In Tuesday's programme, Professor Stewart visits the Bristol Centre for Nanoscience and finds out how nano materials could revolutionise computers and solar power. Nanoscience brings researchers from many disciplines together to study and manipulate matter at the molecular scale. Listeners hear how researchers are working on nano diamonds as a way of creating new solar panels that work well in temperate climes, and how the ears of mosquitoes are being studied in "the world's quietest room" to help miniaturise and improve microphones.

The third programme features Rothamsted Research, the world's oldest agricultural research centre, where scientists are using the latest genetic approaches to improve the health and resistance of crops, amid worries about food security.

In Thursday's programme, Professor Stewart explores stem cell technology at the Centre for Regenerative Medicine in Edinburgh and talks to its scientists about their efforts to treat diseases.

The final programme transports listeners into the National Nuclear Laboratory, the UK's home of nuclear science in Cumbria. Nuclear energy is, many argue, likely to be an important component of the country's quest for green energy. Professor Stewart finds out what the future might hold and why a £250m laboratory at the centre has never been used.

Presenter/Professor Iain Stewart, Producer/Susan Marling

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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South Africa's Path To Freedom

Bank Holiday Monday 31 May
8.00-8.30pm BBC RADIO 4 (Schedule update 27 May)

Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka
Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka

Nobel Prize-winning author Wole Soyinka travels from his native Nigeria to South Africa to assess the past and present of the Rainbow Nation through the eyes of its finest writers.

Wole Soyinka fought apartheid from outside South Africa during the years of oppression and conflict, and now he makes a special journey to the country to meet some of the key writers who lived through the turbulent years.

In Johannesburg, he joins fellow Nobel Prize-winner Nadine Gordimer. At the Constitutional Court, he speaks with Albie Sachs, a former judge who was almost killed in 1988 in a car bomb attack in which he lost an arm and the sight in his right eye.

Instrumental in setting up the legal framework for the new nation, Albie Sachs proves an inspiration to Professor Soyinka. Also in Johannesburg, he speaks to South Africa's Poet Laureate, Keorapetse Kgositsile, and in Cape Town to Antjie Krog, author of the seminal work Country Of My Skull about the Truth And Reconciliation Commission.

Professor Soyinka also meets the new young black writers who are interpreting their world through fiction. In Johannesburg, he visits the local FM radio station to speak to Karabo Kgoleng, who gives her take on modern South Africa, and visits the township of Alexandra to see if living conditions have actually improved.

Finally Soyinka meets playwright Athol Fugard and the two men consider their shared histories.

This is a journey through old and new South Africa by a man who truly understands the work of the African writer. It sheds fresh light on the problems of the past and the challenges of the future for the society that now makes up the Rainbow Nation.

Presenter/Professor Wole Soyinka, Producer/Mark Rickards

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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Book At Bedtime – Blackout In Gretley Ep 1/10

New series
Bank Holiday Monday 31 May to Friday 11 June
10.45-11.00pm BBC RADIO 4

Anton Lesser reads JB Priestley's atmospheric wartime thriller, set in a Midlands town during a blackout.

With an aircraft factory and an electrical plant busy with war work, it soon becomes apparent that sensitive information is being leaked to the enemy. An undercover operative is sent to discover what's going on, and he finds himself surrounded by black marketeers, fifth columnists and an assortment of servicemen and civilians.

As he tries to make sense of this strange cast of characters, his investigation is hampered by a murder. He realises that this uninspiring-looking town harbours some sinister secrets in the dark of its wintry blackout.

Blackout In Gretley is abridged and produced by Jane Marshall.

Reader/Anton Lesser, Producer/Jane Marshall

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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BBC RADIO 5 LIVE Bank Holiday Monday 31 May 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/5live

5 Live Sport

Bank Holiday Monday 31 May
7.00-10.30pm BBC RADIO 5 LIVE

Mark Chapman has all the day's sports news and is joined by special guests for the Monday Night Club to discuss all the latest news from the beautiful game.

From 9.30pm, Mark teams up with Tim Lovejoy for the Football Express, bringing listeners up to date with football's burning issues in just 30 minutes.

Presenter/Mark Chapman, Producer/Ed King

BBC Radio 5 Live Publicity

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BBC RADIO 5 LIVE SPORTS EXTRA
Bank Holiday Monday 31 May 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/5livesportsextra

Test Match Special

Live event/outside broadcast
Bank Holiday Monday 31 May
10.45am-6.30pm BBC RADIO 5 LIVE SPORTS EXTRA

Uninterrupted commentary on the fifth and final day of the first Test between England and Bangladesh comes live from Lord's with the award-winning Test Match Special commentary team.

Producer/Jen McAllister

BBC Radio 5 Live Sports Extra Publicity

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BBC 6 MUSIC Bank Holiday Monday 31 May 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/6music

The Jon Bonham Story

Bank Holiday Monday 31 May
3.00-4.00pm BBC 6 MUSIC

Foo Fighters front-man and Them Crooked Vultures/Nirvana drummer Dave Grohl celebrates a man whom the Encyclopaedia Britannica describes as "the perfect model for all hard rock drummers that have followed": Led Zeppelin's Jon Bonham.

The documentary features exclusive new interview material from stars including Robert Plant, Jimmy Page and Carmine Appice, as well as key industry figures and Bonham's family and close friends. It reveals the extraordinary story of the drummer's life, from his childhood in Redditch, through his time as a session drummer, to his historic part in the legendary Led Zeppelin and his untimely death at the age of just 32.

Told by Grohl with wit and a genuine love for the subject, this electrifying story of a rock 'n' roll legend paints a portrait of the greatest of rock drummers. There are touching tales of Bonham's focus on family and friends, alongside the infamous tales of rock 'n' roll excess. Set to a rich soundtrack, the programme also explores how Led Zeppelin changed the course of rock history.

Presenter/Dave Grohl, Producer/Phil Critchlow

BBC 6 Music Publicity

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Glad To Be Grey With Tom Robinson

Bank Holiday Monday 31 May
4.00-6.00pm BBC 6 MUSIC

In a very special birthday programme, Tom Robinson celebrates turning 60 with a show full of music that takes listeners on a journey through the last six decades and contributions from those who have lived it.

Tom also discusses ageing in the creative industries. Fellow musicians Brian Eno, Steve Harley, Laurie Anderson and Kiki Dee (all entering their seventh decades, too) join Tom to share the music that inspired their careers and to talk about how they're dealing with the prospect of entering old age without ever having had "a proper job". New band Stornoway also offer their thoughts on how the future appears to them.

Motörhead's Fast Eddie joins Tom to discuss "the musician's pension", aka copyright. He is actively challenging the law that sees recorded music copyright expire after 50 years and explains how this affects him and the many others who rely on this as a valuable source of income.

Presenter/Tom Robinson, Producer/Tom Billington

BBC 6 Music Publicity

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Back To The Phuture With Mark Jones

Bank Holiday Monday 31 May
9.00pm-12.00midnight BBC 6 MUSIC

Electronic music expert Mark Jones continues to join the dots between synthesised music past and present. He turns his attention to synth pop, playing classic tracks from Depeche Mode, Soft Cell and John Foxx, alongside future synth stars Hurts, Fenech-Soler and Delphic.

In the second hour of the show, Mark is joined by Andy McCluskey and Paul Humphreys of seminal Liverpool-based electro group OMD, who had a string of hits in the Eighties, including Enola Gay and Electricity. They talk about their rise to fame, the impact their music had on the charts and the music that inspired them to get involved with electronic instruments.

In the final hour, there's a very special guest mix from hot new producer, Grum. Grum – aka Leeds-based producer Graeme Shepherd – set the blogs alight last year with his tune Heartbeats. His album of the same name fuses the sound of Eighties keyboards with throbbing 21st-century electro. In this mix, he plays the retro electro that has inspired him, alongside a collection of his current favourites.

Presenter/Mark Jones, Producer/Rowan Collinson

BBC 6 Music Publicity

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