Press Office

Wednesday 24 Sep 2014

Programme Information

BBC RADIO 1 Monday 8 March 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/radio1

BBC Radio 1 Stories – The A-Z Of Gorillaz

Monday 8 March
9.00-10.00pm BBC RADIO 1

BBC Radio 1's Rob Da Bank talks with Murdoc, 2D, Noodle and Russell about their past, present and future. From Kong Studios to Plastic Beach, this is the story of the most successful animated band of all time.

BBC Radio 1 Stories explore the musical back-stories of listeners' favourite artists, eras, genres and scenes. Previous episodes of the series have included The Story Of The Noughties and The A-Z Of Vampire Weekend.

Presenter/Rob Da Bank

BBC Radio 1 Publicity

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BBC RADIO 2 Monday 8 March 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/radio2

Ken Bruce

Monday 8 March
9.30am-12.00noon BBC RADIO 2

Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter George Benson discusses his Tracks Of My Years each morning this week with Ken Bruce, and his choices include tracks by Marvin Gaye, Savage Garden, Stevie Wonder and Jackie Wilson.

There's also the Popmaster music quiz and the Record Of The Week and Album Of The Week.

Presenter/Ken Bruce, Producer/Phil Jones

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Mark Radcliffe And Stuart Maconie

Monday 8 March
8.00-10.00pm BBC RADIO 2

Musicologist Sid Griffin talks to Mark Radcliffe about a new Captain Beefheart book, Beefheart: Through The Eyes Of Magic by John French.

Presenters/Mark Radcliffe and Stuart Maconie, Producer/Viv Atkinson

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Big Band Special

Monday 8 March
10.00-10.30pm BBC RADIO 2

Clare Teal presents the first part of the BBC Big Band in concert at the Town Hall in Birmingham, performing the music of easy listening kings Henry Mancini and Burt Bacharach.

The concert features guest singer Ian Shaw, with lounge anthems including Make it Easy On Yourself, Alfie and Trains And Boats And Planes.

Presenter/Clare Teal, Producer/Bob McDowall

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BBC RADIO 3 Monday 8 March 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/radio3

Composer Of The Week – Thomas Arne

Monday 8 to Friday 12 March
12.00noon-1.00pm BBC RADIO 3

BBC Radio 3 presenter Donald Macleod
BBC Radio 3 presenter Donald Macleod

This week Donald Macleod introduces listeners to Dr Thomas Arne: musical prodigy, unscrupulous businessman, bad husband and composer of Rule Britannia.

Thomas Arne is remembered today by just a handful of popular songs. Even so, these are some of Britain's most enduring melodies. Rule Britannia has its annual outing during Last Night of the Proms, and his setting of Shakespeare's Where The Bee Sucks remains the best known of the very many versions of that song.

The lasting appeal of these tunes provides just a hint of the fame and popularity he enjoyed as one of London's most successful stage composers in the 18th century. He had a knack for entertaining the city's well-to-do middle classes, and wasn't afraid to pander to low-brow tastes in order to attract audiences.

His reputation as a bad husband did him no favours, though, and rather tarnished his professional career. The masques and plays that served as vehicles for his music were not designed for posterity and much of his legacy has been lost. Plus, he had the misfortune to live and work alongside George Frederick Handel, whose brilliance consigned a whole generation of British composers to shadowy obscurity. Nevertheless, Arne is revealed as one of British music's most vibrant characters.

Presenter/Donald Macleod, Producer/Chris Taylor

BBC Radio 3 Publicity

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Performance On 3

Monday 8 March
7.00-9.15pm BBC RADIO 3

Mark Minkowski conducts the BBC Symphony Orchestra in Pergolesi's impassioned Stabat Mater and Stravinsky's ballet Pulcinella, which reworks pieces by Pergolesi and others.

The impresario Serge Diaghilev suggested to Stravinsky, in exile in Switzerland during the period of the Russian Civil War, that he should make an arrangement of a group of 18 Pergolesi pieces retrieved from the Conservatory library in Naples. Over half of the works turned out to be by other composers. Whatever the identity of the original authors, Stravinsky warmed to his task after seeing the scores and produced a scintillating ballet. The plot centres round the wily Pulcinella and his jealous girlfriend, Pimpinella.

Pergolesi enjoyed international fame during his lifetime. His success was partly due to his comic operas and the impassioned music of his Stabat Mater. Commissioned for Good Friday by the monastery near Naples where he had been residing for his health, it was one of the composer's last works before his death, aged 26. Soloists include soprano Marita Solberg and Matthew Rose.

Presenter/Martin Handley, Producer/Janet Tuppen

BBC Radio 3 Publicity

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Night Waves

Monday 8 March
9.15-10.00pm BBC RADIO 3

Matthew Sweet interviews American novelist and former psychotherapist Amy Bloom about her new collection of short stories, Where The God Of Love Hangs Out.

Bloom started out as a psychotherapist; in addition to her fiction she has written about transvesticism, and also wrote the hit American TV series State Of Mind.

Presenter/Matthew Sweet, Producer/Matthew Dodd

BBC Radio 3 Publicity

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The Essay – Land And Sea And Sky

Monday 8 to Friday 12 March
11.00-11.15pm BBC RADIO 3

This week, five artists who live on the British coast reflect on the personal, cultural and imaginative importance of the meeting of land and sea and sky.

Poet Katrina Porteous lives at the edge of the land in the Northumbrian village of Beadnell and has spent her life exploring and writing about the culture and language of fishing, the land and seascape, the sky full of seabirds and the history of her place. In today's programme, recorded on the rocks, in a tarry old fisherman's hut and the ruins of an ancient headland chapel, she reveals how the meeting of land and sea and sky has shaped the way of life of a community, and her own way of seeing and artistic creation.

On Tuesday listeners can hear from poet Jeremy Hooker who grew up on the Solent shore; and on Wednesday young Liverpool dramatist and singer Lizzie Nunnery gives an urban perspective.

Presenter/Katrina Porteous, Producer/Julian May

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Jazz On 3

Monday 8 March
11.15pm-1.00am BBC RADIO 3

BBC Radio 3 presenter Jez Nelson
BBC Radio 3 presenter Jez Nelson

Jez Nelson presents a transatlantic collaboration between two leading lights of avant-garde jazz and improvised music: New York pianist Matthew Shipp and London-based reeds player John Butcher. Recorded during Shipp's residency at East London's Café Oto, both musicians play solo before coming together for a highly anticipated meeting of musical minds.

Matthew Shipp made his name as part of David S Ware's quartet in the Nineties, before going on to release a series of celebrated albums under his own name featuring musicians such as William Parker and Roscoe Mitchell.

John Butcher's playing is grounded in the history of British free improvisation. Taking elements of Evan Parker's technique and Derek Bailey's philosophy, Butcher has forged his own sound favouring complex overtones and electronic manipulation.

Presenter/Jez Nelson, Producer/Peggy Sutton

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BBC RADIO 4 Monday 8 March 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/radio4

Book Of The Week –
Did You Really Shoot The Television? Ep 1/5

New series
Monday 8 to Friday 12 March
9.45-10.00am BBC RADIO 4

Max Hastings is a renowned military historian and former editor of The Telegraph and Evening Standard newspapers. He is the son of two heralded parents – roving reporter and author "Mac" Hastings and magazine editor and gardening writer Anne Scott-James. Theirs was a bumpy, eventful, ill-starred marriage which is the subject of Max's new book. Did You Really Shoot The Television? is a voyage around his parents.

Max himself says he was guilty of "some pretty frightful childhood behaviour" and of course it led to disaster with said TV set.

Max Hastings reads, with Nigel Hastings (no relation) speaking the words of Mac and Joanna Monro the words of Anne.

Readers/Max Hastings, Nigel Hastings and Joanna Munro,
Producer/Duncan Minshull

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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A Good School

Monday 8 March
11.00-11.30am BBC RADIO 4

As Anne McElvoy trawls schools looking for the right place for her own children, she's been confronted by an underlying question: what is a "good school" and how does the intellectual history of that aspiration influence the political argument and the educational choices today?

Anne speaks to leading politicians at the heart of the debate about education at secondary level. She hears from Michael Gove, the Shadow Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families, who has made it clear that he wants a return to more traditional educational techniques. He has criticised courses and exam boards for not including enough teaching from the canon of established knowledge and wants more schools to replicate the kind of classically based education he enjoyed at an independent school.

In further new interviews for the programme, the Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families, Ed Balls, challenges Gove's vision of the good school, as does Liberal Democrat peer Shirley Williams, herself a former Education Secretary.

Other contributors include Pete Hyman, a former aide to Tony Blair, who now teaches at an inner-London comprehensive; sociologist Professor Frank Furedi; philosopher Dr Annabel Brett; and Chris Woodhead, the former Chief Inspector of Schools.

Today, the "good school" argument is as lively as ever and the discussion in the programme is firmly rooted in the current arguments which will shape the election campaign and schools beyond it.

Presenter/Anne McElvoy, Producer/Rebecca Stratford

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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A Brief History Of Double Entry Book-keeping Ep 1/10

New series
Monday 8 to Friday 12 March
3.45-4.00pm BBC RADIO 4

Jolyon Jenkins investigates how accountants shaped the modern world.

The history of accounting is the history of civilisation itself. The current political and economic crises are directly accountancy related – yet double entry book-keeping was central to the success of the Italian merchants, necessary to the birth of the Renaissance. And going back further still to ancient Mesopotamia, "writing" was invented not by poets and storytellers, but by state accountants who wanted to keep track of who had paid their taxes.

In this series, Jolyon looks at how double entry book-keeping arose from religious impulses – but also how accountants have been directly implicated in human-rights abuses; and how, throughout history, private accounts books often tell the true story while public accounts statements sometimes may not.

Jolyon also explores how ideas of accountancy, accountability and audit have seeped from the world of business into the entire public realm so that performance indicators and measurable targets govern the working – and indeed private – lives of much of the population.

Presenter/Jolyon Jenkins, Producers/Jolyon Jenkins and Beatrice Fenton

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Document Ep 1/3

New series
Monday 8 March
8.00-8.30pm BBC RADIO 4

BBC Radio 4's investigative history strand returns as Mike Thomson begins another series of paper chases through the past – a document or object that has been lost or concealed for years is discovered and those involved are held to account.

The subjects in this new series range from Britain's involvement in Yemen in the Sixties, to the treatment of German POWs at the end of the Second World War.

Presenter/Mike Thomson, Producer/Philip Sellars

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Costing The Earth Ep 6/9

Monday 8 March
9.00-9.30pm BBC RADIO 4

2010 could be the breakthrough year for fusion energy. In this week's Costing The Earth, Tom Heap asks if it can save the world.

For 50 years nuclear fusion has been touted as the safe, cheap, limitless fuel of the future. In 2010 the future may finally arrive.

This year the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in the United States is expected to fire a laser which will demonstrate, for the first time, more energy coming out of a fusion reaction than has been put in. For many scientists it will be the public proof that all their work has been worthwhile, that the future really does belong to fusion energy.

Tom meets the world's top fusion scientists and, from a safe distance, witnesses a fusion reaction taking place. He asks what the enormous recent advances in fusion research really mean; whether there is enough fuel available to move from experimentation to real-world energy production; how safe the whole process is; and whether the future does belong to fusion.

Presenter/Tom Heap, Producer/Alasdair Cross

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Rory Bremner's International Satirists Ep 1/3

New series
Monday 8 March
11.00-11.30pm BBC RADIO 4

In this new comedy series, Rory Bremner engages topical comics, satirists and comedians from different countries about their cultures and how they relate to ours – if at all.

In the first programme, Rory meets Hans Teeuwen from Amsterdam, an absurdist, comic performer and singer who takes great risks on stage and has been likened to Bill Hicks and Andy Kaufman. But after the murder of his close friend Theo Van Gogh, he decided to start performing his Dutch "cabaretier" show in English to wide acclaim.

Rory Bremner and Hans explore the world of performance, topical and absurdist comedy, exchanging views and impressions while discussing the risks facing Dutch comics today. The programme features media academic Professor Liesbet van Zoonen of Loughborough University and Erasmus University, Rotterdam.

Next week, Rory meets Barry Murphy. Described as the "Don of Irish comedy" by the Irish Times, Barry set up the Comedy Cellars club in Dublin.

In the final programme, Rory speaks to Viktor Giacobbo who has been a satirical presence in Switzerland for the best part of 30 years and uses a variety of comic character creations to illustrate the subtle but active societal differences in the country.

Presenter/Rory Bremner, Producer/Andrew McGibbon

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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BBC RADIO 5 LIVE Monday 8 March 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/5live

5 Live Sport

Live event/outside broadcast
Monday 8 March
7.00-10.30pm BBC RADIO 5 LIVE

Mark Chapman has all the day's sports news and is joined by special guests for the Monday Night Club to discuss the latest big issues in football. At 7.35pm there's live coverage of the rugby league's Challenge Cup fourth round draw.

From 8pm there's Premier League commentary of Wigan versus Liverpool live from the DW stadium.

Presenter/Mark Chapman, Producer/Ed King

BBC Radio 5 Live Publicity

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BBC 6 MUSIC Monday 8 March 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/6music

Lauren Laverne

Monday 8 March
10.00am-1.00pm BBC 6 MUSIC

Lauren Laverne marks International Women's Day by celebrating the great female singers and songwriters of the past 40 years. She also welcomes Sarah Blasko into the studio for a live session. The Australian solo artist has found critical and commercial success in her own country and word is now beginning to spread to the UK. She comes in to the BBC 6 Music studio to chat to Lauren and play live.

Presenter/Lauren Laverne, Producer/Gary Bales

BBC 6 Music Publicity

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Nemone

Monday 8 March
1.00-4.00pm BBC 6 MUSIC

Nemone's band of the week is Dag For Dag. Dag For Dag are Swedish-based duo Sarah and Jacob Snavely who settled down in Sweden three years ago to make music. They have toured with Lykke Li, Shout Out Louds, The Kills and Wolf Parade. The band comes into the BBC 6 Music studio for a lunchtime chat with Nemone.

Plus, this week's hand-picked playlist comes courtesy of Brummie indie rockers Editors. They have chosen tracks by, among others, Spoon, Mew, Bats For Lashes and Les Paul. The band is currently on tour promoting their third studio album, In The Light And On This Evening.

Presenter/Nemone, Producer/Jax Coombes

BBC 6 Music Publicity

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Steve Lamacq

Monday 8 March
4.00-7.00pm BBC 6 MUSIC

Following on from the success of BBC 6 Music's Metal World Cup last November, Steve Lamacq kicks off the 2010 Punk World Cup.  

16 punk bands will be chosen for Monday's draw which pits punk heavyweights such as The Sex Pistols and The Damned against the likes of Stiff Little Fingers and The Clash to see who is the ultimate punk band.  

Journalist, author and Punk Musician John Robb joins Lammo on Monday with his thoughts on the runners and riders while the rest of the week sees esteemed journalists and musicians joining Steve to pick the winners from every match, with thoughts and opinions from the 6 Music audience. The victor will be revealed in Friday's show when the winner of the Safety Pin shaped 6 Music Punk World Cup is crowned.  

Presenter/Steve Lamacq, Producer/Paul Sheehan

BBC 6 Music Publicity

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Gideon Coe

Monday 8 March
9.00pm-12.00midnight BBC 6 MUSIC

Gideon Coe's musical gems include concert highlights from We Are Scientists, playing at South By South West in 2006. Session archive comes from artists as varied as former Pipette Rose Elinor Dougall, jocular musical mickey-takers Snuff and Joni Mitchell from 1968.

Presenter/Gideon Coe, Producer/Frank Wilson

BBC 6 Music Publicity

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BBC ASIAN NETWORK Monday 8 March 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/asiannetwork

Silver Street

Monday 8 March
12.15-12.20pm BBC ASIAN NETWORK

Rozena dreams she is a domestic goddess with Simran and Rita praising her dinner parties, as the drama continues. Then, Sameer asks Imran for time with "the Boss" but who is he talking about?

Rozena wakes to the commotion of Jaggy and Simran moving back into their flat. Meanwhile, Sameer ignores a call from Imran and Rozena realises the dream has affected her more than she thought.

Later Jaggy realises that being Sameer's neighbour again is not going to be easy...

Rozena is played by Pooja Ghai, Simran by Balvinder Sopal, Rita by Bharti Patel, Sameer by Alex Caan, Imran by Narinder Samra and Jaggy by Jay Kiyani.

BBC Asian Network Publicity

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BBC WORLD SERVICE Monday 8 March 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice

SUPERPOWER SEASON
How To Make Your First Billion Ep 1/10

New seriesInteractive Programme
Monday 8 to Friday 12 March
8.50-9.00am BBC WORLD SERVICE
11.50am-12.00noon BBC WORLD SERVICE (Copy update 25 February)

Silicon Valley is a global hub of cutting-edge high-tech companies, entrepreneurs and start-ups that have seen back-room ideas developed into big business and global brands.

How To Make Your First Billion is a multi-media drama and a fictionalised insight into Silicon Valley, the home of the global communications revolution.

Jake (28), a serial entrepreneur who has yet to succeed with a start-up company, and Subash (26), a technical whizz from India who Jake studied with at college, decide to go into business together. Combining Subash's ideas and technical know-how with Jake's entrepreneurial flair, the two have a vision for an internet business which they believe will change the world. Fuelled by the track record of other small, home-grown businesses that have made their mark in Silicon Valley and become billion-dollar businesses, they believe they can do the same.

The drama follows the trials and tribulations as the pair attempt to get the business off the ground.

Recorded in a documentary style on location in Silicon Valley, the story echoes many of the real-life tales of entrepreneurs who started out from nothing to create iconic brands.

Real-life entrepreneurs also feature, offering advice to the two characters as they try to launch their business. These include Biz Stone, co-founder of Twitter; Susan Wojcicki, Google's 16th employee; Michael Arrington, editor of TechCrunch; Ron Conway, Angel Investor and one of the earliest investors in Google and Facebook; Gideon Yu, former Chief Financial Officer of Facebook, YouTube and now a venture capitalist; Jay Adelson, co-founder Digg and CEO of Equinix; Jerry Yang and David Filo, co founders of Yahoo; and David Weekly, programmer and entrepreneur who wrote the first layman’s description of MP3 in early 1997.

The series consists of 10, nine-minute radio pieces and five, five-minute films, alongside a series of daily online diary features.

Written by Matthew Solon, an award-winning writer whose work has featured on BBC World Service and BBC Radio 4, the play is directed by John Dryden, whose previous credits include the 10-part serialisation of Vikas Swarup's Q & A (Slumdog Millionaire) for Radio 4, which won the 2008 Sony Award for Best Drama.

Matthew and John have collaborated on a number of fictional documentary style dramas that are rooted in real life or news events. They worked together on the BBC World Service's drama The Day That Lehman Died, a fictionalised account of events over the weekend prior to the bank's demise, and also collaborated on Election Lives, a news-based drama in South Africa, in which Nelson Mandela had a walk-on part.

How To Make Your First Billion is part of SuperPower, a major season on the BBC's International News Services – BBC World Service, BBC World News and bbc.com – exploring the extraordinary power of the internet.

BBC World Service Publicity

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