Press Office

Wednesday 24 Sep 2014

Programme Information

BBC RADIO 1 Sunday 3 January 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/radio1

BBC Radio 1 Live

Sunday 3 January
12.00midnight-4.00am BBC RADIO 1

Listeners have another chance to hear some of the best live performances to have featured on BBC Radio 1 in 2009, from Coldplay, Arctic Monkeys, Dizzee Rascal and Lily Allen.

Each one-hour performance runs back to back, beginning with Coldplay at Hampden Park (12midnight-1am), followed by Arctic Monkeys at Maida Vale (1-2am) and Dizzee Rascal at the BBC Electric Proms (2-3am). The night wraps up with Lily Allen at BBC Radio 1's Big Weekend (3-4am).

Producer/Kat Wong

BBC Radio 1 Publicity

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BBC RADIO 2 Sunday 3 January 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/radio2

Sunday Love Songs

Sunday 3 January
9.00-11.00am BBC RADIO 2

Ronan Keating sits in for Steve Wright this week and presents a special Sunday Love Songs in which the first hour of music features performances from guys, while in the second hour it's over to the girls.

Presenter/Ronan Keating, Producer/Jessica Rickson

BBC Radio 2 Publicity

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Elaine Paige On Sunday

Sunday 3 January
1.00-3.00pm BBC RADIO 2

In a special edition of the programme, Elaine Paige plays some of her favourite exclusive in-studio performances recorded during 2009. These include songs by the West End casts of The Lion King, Priscilla Queen Of The Desert, Oliver!, Forbidden Broadway, Avenue Q, Chicago, Jersey Boys, Hairspray and a song from Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat performed by Gareth Gates.

Presenter/Elaine Paige, Producer/Malcolm Prince

BBC Radio 2 Publicity

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Sunday Half Hour

Sunday 3 January
8.30-9.00pm BBC RADIO 2

Brian D'Arcy celebrates Epiphany and the feast of the three Magi with much-loved music for Twelfth Night. For many, this is the climax of the Advent and Christmas seasons.

Music comes from King's College Chapel Choir with members of the Aberdeen University Choral Society, directed by Roger Williams. Hymns include As With Gladness Men Of Old and Three Kings From Persian Lands Afar.

Presenter/Brian D'Arcy, Producer/Janet McLarty

BBC Radio 2 Publicity

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BBC RADIO 3 Sunday 3 January 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/radio3

Private Passions – Katie Mitchell

Sunday 3 January
12.00noon-1.00pm BBC RADIO 3

Michael Berkeley's guest on Private Passions this week is theatre director Katie Mitchell.

Katie has been much influenced by Eastern European theatre and studied under Lev Dodin and Tadeusz Kantor. She demands long, intensive rehearsal periods and uses the Stanislavsky method to create productions characterised by emotional intensity and realistic acting, several of which have sparked controversy for their unconventional approach to the texts. Katie is currently directing two productions at the National Theatre – Ferdinand Bruckner's The Pains Of Youth, and a much lighter subject, The Cat In The Hat, based on Dr Seuss's children's story.

Katie often uses music in her productions and her choices include the aria Erbarme dich from Bach's St Matthew Passion, which she recently directed at Glyndebourne, an extract from Luigi Non's Al gran sole carico d'amore, which she directed at Salzburg earlier this year, and Alfred Schnittke's Stille nacht for violin and piano. Schnittke's highly idiosyncratic music has influenced her own use of music and sound in the theatre.

Presenter/Michael Berkeley, Producer/Chris Marshall

BBC Radio 3 Publicity

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Discovering Music – Fauré Requiem

Sunday 3 January
5.00-6.30pm BBC RADIO 3

Stephen Johnson explores the musical nuances of Gabriel Fauré's Requiem in D minor, in both its original and more familiar revised version, using recordings by John Eliot Gardiner and Harry Christophers.

Fauré composed what is arguably his magnum opus between 1870 and 1890, but his reasons for composing the piece are uncertain. He lost both his parents within two years of each other, which may have been his original impetus, but by the time of his mother's death he had already begun the work.

The first version of the work, which he called "un petit Requiem", included just five movements. Over two years Fauré expanded the piece to the now more familiar seven movements, and altered some of his original orchestrations.

In 1899-1900, the score was reworked again for full orchestra, probably by one of his students. This was the definitive version of the Requiem – played at Fauré's funeral in 1924 – until John Rutter rediscovered the original manuscript of the chamber orchestra version in the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris in the early Eighties. It has now become one of the most popular pieces for choirs and choral societies around the world.

Presenter/Stephen Johnson, Producer/Les Pratt

BBC Radio 3 Publicity

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Sunday Feature – Rona

Sunday 3 January
9.30-10.15pm BBC RADIO 3

Scottish poet Kathleen Jamie visits the uninhabited island of North Roma
Scottish poet Kathleen Jamie visits the uninhabited island of North Roma

Distinguished Scottish poet and writer Kathleen Jamie joins a "once-in-a-blue-moon" research expedition to the tiny uninhabited island of North Rona, 45 miles out into the Atlantic Ocean, west of Cape Wrath in Sutherland.

Here, Kathleen observes and assists with seabird surveys – counting the rare and mysterious Leach's Petrel – and archaeologists mapping the island's eighth-century early Celtic Christian buildings.

As a family pod of killer whales circles the cliffs of Rona – the adults teaching their calves to catch seals – Kathleen, surrounded by thousands of puffins and a herd of grumpy sheep, considers ideas of remoteness and isolation.

Presenter/Kathleen Jamie, Producer/Tim Dee

BBC Radio 3 Publicity

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BBC RADIO 4 Sunday 3 January 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/radio4

The Custom Of The Country Ep 1/3

New series
Sunday 3 January
3.00-4.00pm BBC RADIO 4

Award-winning writer Jane Rogers dramatises The Custom Of The Country, Edith Wharton's compelling social satire about marriage and money in early 20th-century American society.

Set between 1900 and 1910, The Custom Of The Country tells the story of Undine Spragg, a beautiful but remorselessly selfish young woman, who moves from Apex to New York, marries Ralph Marvell from an old New York family, and rapidly wears out his income, love and health. She has a son, Paul, whom she neglects. She moves on to Paris, divorce and marriage to Raymond, a French aristocrat, but soon tires of him.

Elmer Moffatt, an old acquaintance from Apex, weaves through her life – he is there at every point of crisis. A self-made millionaire, he has a powerful hold on Undine – a shared past that she is desperate to conceal. Perhaps he is the only man who truly understands her.

Rebecca Night (Lark Rise To Candleford and Wuthering Heights) plays Undine, Dan Stevens (Sense And Sensibility, Dracula and The Line Of Beauty) plays Ralph, Lorelei King (After You've Gone, Cold Feet) plays Mrs Heeny and Tom Hollander (A Good Year, Pirates Of The Caribbean and Pride And Prejudice) plays Elmer Moffatt.

Producer/Nadia Molinari

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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Book Club

Sunday 3 January
4.00-4.30pm BBC RADIO 4

Best-selling author Alexander McCall Smith has written more than 90 books. Among them is a series set in Scotland Street, Edinburgh. In this edition of Book Club, James Naughtie and a group of readers discuss the first in the series – 44 Scotland Street.

This comic novel was first published in The Scotsman newspaper as a daily story. Like Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy and Armistead Maupin before him, Alexander got the idea for writing stories on a daily basis at a party in San Francisco, where he met Maupin.

Readers in the audience ask questions about the myriad characters that live in the flats at the eponymous address – the narcissistic young man; the wise older woman; the pushy mother and her poor put-upon son, Bertie, who ends up in therapy. Bertie remains six years old throughout the series, even though adult characters are patently growing older.

Alexander talks about the challenges of writing a thousand words a day; how readers would advise him on where to take the story next; and what they thought he should do with characters they didn't like. He also explains how a few real people, including novelist Ian Rankin and art gallery owner Guy Peploe, turned up in the stories.

Presenter/James Naughtie, Producer/Dymphna Flynn

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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Miles Jupp's Muscular Lines

Sunday 3 January
4.30-4.55pm BBC RADIO 4

Miles Jupp asks whether patriotic poems, which inspired boys a century ago, can still move young men today.

In the early 20th century, English prep school boys were served up memorable slabs such as Hearts Of Oak and Flags Of England, and battles, duels and jungle explorations. Some of it was first rate, exhorting young readers to feats of strength and self-reliance, but not all. Good or bad, tales of battles or of foreign shores, it was all intended to be memorised.

Miles delves between the leather covers of the Muscular Lines that once entranced, or made miserable, Britain's schoolboys. He takes a wide sounding of today's masculine opinion and modern-day explorers like Ranulph Fiennes and Bear Grylls make their selections from the books.

Miles also speaks to some of the men who still remember lines from the books; he visits rugby clubs and army barracks to see what today's men make of the verse; and he takes the Edwardian best-seller back to his own all-boys prep school to see how the poems which preached yesterday's masculine values sit with the young men of tomorrow.

Presenter/Miles Jupp, Producer/David Stenhouse

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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More Than A Game – The Fight Ep 1/3

New series
Sunday 3 January
10.45-11.00pm BBC RADIO 4

In June 1938, 64 per cent of Americans who owned a radio tuned in to listen to one of the most politically charged boxing matches in history. In More Than A Game – The Fight, the first of three programmes looking at politically significant sporting events, Professor Anthony King of Essex University discusses the fight between black American boxer Joe Louis and white German fighter Max Schmeling.

In 1936, Louis had seemed invincible, but in Yankee Stadium, New York, he was sensationally beaten by Schmeling. It was a propaganda triumph for the Nazis. A Nazi journal declared the victory not only a matter of sport but "a question of prestige for our race". German minister Joseph Goebbels used footage of the fight in one of his most successful propaganda films.

By 1938, Louis had become World Champion after defeating another American, but he wanted to avenge the one blot on his record. With the prospect of war looming, the fight took on significance far beyond the sport. US president Franklin D Roosevelt reportedly invited Louis to the White House and told him: "Joe, we're depending on those muscles for America."

The fight acquired a massive importance for black and white Americans; for Jewish people; for people around the world who opposed fascism; and for the Nazi regime in Germany. Louis and Schmeling were caught in the middle, whether they liked it or not.

The fight took place on 22 June with the whole world listening. It lasted just 124 seconds and was over so quickly many people missed it – Schmeling was knocked out.

Presenter/Professor Anthony King, Producer/Chris Bond

BBC News Publicity

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BBC RADIO 5 LIVE Sunday 3 January 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/5live

5 Live Sport

Live event/outside broadcast
Sunday 3 January
12.00noon-6.00pm BBC RADIO 5 LIVE

Colin Murray presents an afternoon of live sport including live Scottish Premier League (SPL) commentary on the Old Firm derby between Celtic and Rangers, from Celtic Park, at 12.30pm.

There's also coverage from the day's FA Cup third-round matches and updates from the Edinburgh derby between Hibernian and Hearts in the SPL from 3pm and reports from the first day of the third Test match between South Africa and England in Cape Town.

Presenter/Colin Murray, Producer/Graham McMillan

BBC Radio 5 Live Publicity

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BBC RADIO 5 LIVE SPORTS EXTRA
Sunday 3 January 2010
www.bbc.co.uk/5livesportsextra

Test Match Special

Live event/outside broadcast
Sunday 3 January
8.10am-4.00pm BBC RADIO 5 LIVE SPORTS EXTRA

The Test Match Special team, led by Jonathan Agnew, presents ball-by-ball commentary on the opening day's play of the third Test match between South Africa and England, live from Newlands, Cape Town. Simon Mann and Gerald de Kock are alongside Jonathan in the commentary box with Ashes-winning former England captain Michael Vaughan, Geoffrey Boycott and Duncan Fletcher providing the expert summary.

Producer/Jen McAllister

BBC Radio 5 Live Sports Extra Publicity

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NFL American Football

Live event/outside broadcast
Sunday 3 January
9.00pm-12.30am BBC RADIO 5 LIVE SPORTS EXTRA

Arlo White introduces live commentary from the final week of the regular NFL season, the last chance for teams to get a place in the post-season play-offs.

Arlo is joined by Neil Reynolds and Greg Brady with all the news from around the NFL.

Presenter/Arlo White

BBC Radio 5 Live Sports Extra Publicity

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