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Wednesday 29 Oct 2014

Programme Information

Network Radio BBC Week 13: Monday 30 March 2009

BBC RADIO 2 Monday 30 March 2009

Third Reich & Roll Ep 3/3

Monday 30 March
11.30pm-12.00midnight BBC RADIO 2

Actor, author and presenter Stephen Fry
Actor, author and presenter Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry presents the concluding part of the fascinating story of how the Third Reich – a dictatorship with an advanced appreciation of media manipulation – developed magnetic tape recording.

This final episode goes digital, looking at how the hard drive was born, how sampling and synthesizer technology was developed and how this revolution led directly to the creation of new musical genres. But it's much more than music now. Music can be downloaded to portable MP3 players. Anyone can listen, anyone can podcast.

The Third Reich's authorities believed that tape recording would help them maintain control, but it actually started a train of events that led to the enjoyment of personal freedoms that they could never have envisaged.

Presenter/Stephen Fry, Producer/Steve Levine

BBC Radio 2 Publicity

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Janice Long

Monday 30 March
12.00midnight-3.00am BBC RADIO 2

Janice Long talks to Scottish singer-songwriter Jim Kerr, who chooses some of his favourite records and updates Janice on his latest work, including the release of a new Simple Minds album and a string of summer tour dates.

Presenter/Janice Long, Producer/Mark Plant

BBC Radio 2 Publicity

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BBC RADIO 3 Monday 30 March 2009

Composer Of The Week – Arcangelo Corelli Ep 1/5

Monday 30 March to Friday 3 April
12.00noon-1.00pm BBC RADIO 3

Donald Macleod begins a week of programmes about the glittering career of Arcangelo Corelli, whose meteoric rise to stardom in 17th-century Rome was followed by fame and honour across Europe.

Corelli's name is not particularly well known these days, yet he was one of the most influential musicians of the early-Baroque era. His significance is attributed to the reputation he enjoyed during his lifetime and for some decades after. Hailed as the greatest violinist in the world, he helped define the model for instrumental music in his era with dazzling sonatas and concertos that became the gold-standard by which composers such as Purcell and Bach judged their own work.

In today's programme, Donald reveals that Corelli's reputation rests on a relatively small collection of six publications, with just a handful of accounts of his brilliant playing. His music, though, glows with quality, with the composer rigorously honing and polishing each bar until every movement sparkles.

Presenter/Donald Macleod, Producer/Chris Taylor

BBC Radio 3 Publicity

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Afternoon On 3 – Berlin Philharmonic

Monday 30 March
2.00-5.00pm BBC RADIO 3

This week's programmes celebrate the extraordinary musicianship and versatility of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra.

Cornerstones of the ensemble's traditional repertoire include symphonies by Bruckner, Schumann and Mozart and the orchestra is also put through its early music paces under the baton of Trevor Pinnock. Venezuelan star Gustavo Dudamel leads the orchestra in a dazzling Latin-American programme, and guest soloists include pianist Lang Lang and violinist Gil Shaham.

Afternoon On 3 also continues BBC Radio 3's ongoing project to broadcast all of Handel's surviving operas, offering a chance to hear his 1723 masterpiece Ottone, re di Germania, presented in conversation by its star, counter-tenor James Bowman.

Presenter/Penny Gore, Producer/Kevin Bee

BBC Radio 3 Publicity

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Performance On 3 – Hallé Orchestra

Monday 30 March
7.00-9.15pm BBC RADIO 3

Sir Mark Elder directs the Hallé in a programme that opens with Leos Janáček's last orchestral piece, Schluck und Jau, which was left unfinished.

American virtuoso Garrick Ohlsson is the soloist in Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 5 and, concluding the concert, they are joined by the ladies of the Hallé Choir and the Hallé Youth Choir for The Planets by Gustav Holst.

The performance is followed by a focus on the music, composers and performers from the Czech Republic featuring Janáček String Quartets 1 and 2.

Presenter/Petroc Trelawny, Producer/Juan Carlos Jaramillo

BBC Radio 3 Publicity

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The Essay – A Good Death Ep 1/5

Monday 30 March to Friday 3 April
11.00-11.15pm BBC RADIO 3

The notion of a "good death" is the subject of this week's series of five personal and powerful essays.

In today's world, preoccupied with prolonging life, "a good death" seems to have lost its relevance. Yet this very idea has been a defining notion throughout history, from the classical era in which the Greeks saw heroic death in battle as the ultimate "good death", to the medieval era when the notion of Ars Moriendi re-emerged to deal with the horrors of the Black Death.

In these essays, writers and thinkers ponder what makes a "good death" today and whether it is through having lived a good life or if is there something intrinsically important in dying well.

Now that the majority of deaths tend to occur later in life, in the sterile surroundings of a hospital ward rather than at home, the writers look at how this distancing from death has changed our relationship with dying. They also explore whether the portrayal of death in literature and history has influenced hopes and expectations for our own deaths.

Mary Beard, Professor of Classics at the University Of Cambridge, reflects on what – if anything – we can learn from the Ancient Greeks and Romans when it comes to dying well.

Presenter/Professor Mary Beard, Producer/Justine Willett

BBC Radio 3 Publicity

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Jazz On 3 – Joshua Redman Trio Live At Ronnie Scott's

Monday 30 March
11.15pm-1.00am BBC RADIO 3

Jez Nelson presents US saxophonist Joshua Redman, recorded live in concert at Ronnie Scott's with Reuben Rogers on bass and Greg Hutchinson on drums.

The son of late avant-garde saxophonist Dewey Redman, Joshua grew up independently of his father and is largely self-taught. After winning the Thelonious Monk Prize in 1991, Joshua gave up a career in law and quickly earned a world-wide reputation both as a side-man with Pat Metheny, Chick Corea and Paul Motian, and as a band leader.

Joshua is known for his formidable technique and a charismatic stage presence, the combination of which has been credited with bringing new and younger audiences to jazz. His approach is rooted in melody, lyricism and traditional structures, but his latest album, Compass, embraces freer forms and features his most experimental work to date.

Presenter/Jez Nelson, Producer/Peggy Sutton

BBC Radio 3 Publicity

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BBC RADIO 4 Monday 30 March 2009

Woman's Hour Drama – Daunt And Dervish Ep 1/5

New series
Monday 30 March
10.45-11.00am BBC RADIO 4

The ladies are back in the fourth series of the popular comedy-thriller, Daunt And Dervish. It is now 1956 and Britain is in the throes of the Suez crisis and in thrall to the sound of a young American singer called Elvis.

Rock 'n' roll is in the air and so is the sound of wedding bells as a seemingly straightforward investigation into the theft of fashion designs turns into something more sinister.

During wartime, Josephine Daunt, a Special Operations Executive operative in France, and Dervish, her controller in London, were engaged in exciting and dangerous work. But in peacetime they found themselves at a loose end. Though very different people – Daunt, Cambridge educated, meticulous and inquisitive, and Dervish, practical, energetic and instinctive – they work well together and form a private detective agency, enlisting the help of Bill Mackie, a former private detective, whose son had been killed in the war while working for SOE.

Josephine's preparations for her marriage to Bill have to take a back seat when an up-and-coming young British fashion designer reports the theft of her latest designs. It seems a pretty straightforward case, but before too long Daunt and Dervish find themselves mixed up in a world of Teddy boys, political chicanery and sudden death.

Written by Guy Meredith, the drama stars Anna Massey and Sylvestra Le Touzel as Daunt and Dervish with Sean Scanlan as Bill Mackie.

Producer/Colin Guthrie

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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Afternoon Play – Dewey Eyed

Monday 30 March
2.15-3.00pm BBC RADIO 4

A librarian from a long line of librarians and proud of it, Philippa's life is thrown into chaos when her father dies and her mother, Vera, loses her wits. To bring back her sanity, Philippa tries talking the only language her mother understands– that of the Dewey Decimal System.

Favoured by libraries for cataloguing books since the late 19th century, the Dewey Decimal System allows for no grey areas – everything has a number. Frighteningly for Philippa, her mother embraces this new language, and opens up areas of her memory that might otherwise have been forever filed under "private". Philippa is not sure if she can cope with entering the Reserved Access Section of her mother's mental library.

Dewey Eyed is written by Sarah Naomi Lee and stars Olivia Colman as Philippa; Sheila Reid as Vera; Caroline Guthrie as Sheila; and Paul Rider as Alistair.

Producer/Jessica Dromgoole

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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Into The Gap Ep 1/5

New series
Monday 30 March
3.45-4.00pm BBC RADIO 4

Poet Lemn Sissay watches Britain on the move, capturing the sounds and stories of Watford Gap Services over a period of 24 hours from midnight to midnight.

A compulsive people watcher, Lemn buys a coffee and some gift-wrapped fudge and witnesses modern Britons at the cultural car stop that is Watford Gap.

Serenaded by the howls of arcade games and quiet chit-chat over burgers and cappuccinos, Lemn arrives for a 24-hour stint. But as these people in transit wait, the sound of the motorway still ringing in their ears, the smell of petrol and air fresheners still in their nostrils, he wonders what fantasies, fears and fun will fuel their conversation.

In five programmes as Lemn talks and listens, themes begin to emerge, stanzas form and ordinary travellers become characters in a complex human drama – the motorway mosaic.

Presenter/Neil George, Producer/Philip Sellars

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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The Medicalisation Of Normality

Monday 30 March
9.00-9.30pm BBC RADIO 4

The Medicalisation Of Normality explores whether drugs are being used to create identikit humans.

Knowledge of the chemistry of the brain is expanding at a phenomenal rate. The result is a new generation of drugs that can control moods, emotions and responses to stimuli infinitely more effectively than any drug before.

This armoury offers genuine hope for many people with serious mental illness, but the drug companies see a much broader market for these compounds. If these drugs can make people smarter, help them concentrate, make them more confident, then people without serious problems may want to get their hands on them. But most western countries will only approve drugs for use to combat-recognised clinical conditions.

Some experts believe that the ability to cope with people who are different to the norm is being lost and that some drugs are being used to iron out the eccentricities, creating a homogenous, off-the-shelf 21st-century person who conforms exactly to current definitions of normality.

The drug designers, patients and philosophers offer their views in an attempt to reach a consensus on a drug-directed future.

Presenter/John Naish, Producer/Alasdair Cross

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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Book At Bedtime – The Earth Hums In B Flat Ep 1/5

Monday 30 March to Friday 3 April
10.45-11.00pm BBC RADIO 4

Young Gwenni Morgan has a gift: she can fly in her sleep. A good girl, anxious to please, Gwenni is fond of detective stories and asking difficult questions.

Gwenni's mother lends her to a local teacher to help with her housework and childcare. The teacher befriends Gwenni, lending her precious books. But one day there is a huge sticky patch on the floor. Maybe they spilt the jam. Strangely, the teacher's husband has mysteriously disappeared.

Gwenni tries to unravel what is going on round her. She records faithfully what she sees and hears but begins to wonder if her deductions are correct.

Set in a small Welsh town on the brink of change in the Fifties, and written in the first person with an immediacy that makes even her dreams real, Gwenni Morgan is unforgettable.

The Earth Hums In B Flat is written by Mari Strachen, abridged for radio by Arnold Evans and read by actress Joanna Page.

Reader/Joanna Page, Producer/Kate McAll

BBC Radio 4 Publicity

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BBC RADIO 5 LIVE Monday 30 March 2009

Fiona Phillips

Monday 30 March
1.00-4.00pm BBC RADIO 5 LIVE

Former GMTV presenter Fiona Phillips returns to the BBC, beginning a week-long stint sitting in for Simon Mayo with a mix of special guests from the world of arts and entertainment, as well as the latest news, sport and reviews.

Fiona began her broadcasting career in independent radio before joining the BBC South and East Weekend Programme as a co-presenter, eventually going on to present for Sky Television and then GMTV.

Presenter/Fiona Phillips, Producer/Robin Bulloch

BBC Radio 5 Live Publicity

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5 Live Sport

Monday 30 March
7.00-10.00pm BBC RADIO 5 LIVE

Mark Saggers presents the day's sports news and is joined by special guests John Motson and Alan Pardew for The Monday Night Club, discussing all the latest football issues.

Presenter/Mark Saggers, Producer/Francesca Bent

BBC Radio 5 Live Publicity

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BBC 6 MUSIC Monday 30 March 2009

Gideon Coe

Monday 30 March
9.00pm-12.00midnight BBC 6 MUSIC

Presenter and broadcaster Gideon Coe
Presenter and broadcaster Gideon Coe

Gideon Coe delves into the archives with the Bhundu Boys and Devendra Banhart in concert plus classic sessions from Led Zeppelin, Wave Pictures, Marden Hill and Johnny Flynn.

Presenter/Gideon Coe, Producer/Mark Sheldon

BBC 6 Music Publicity

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6 Music Plays It Again – You'll Never Be Sixteen Again Ep 7/7

Monday 30 March
12.00midnight-12.30am BBC 6 MUSIC

First broadcast in 1985, this rare chance to hear the acclaimed series telling the story of the British teenager concludes with part one of the seventh episode, The Best Years Of Our Lives.

Through music, archive and reminiscence, John Peel deals with New Romantics, glue sniffers, casuals and psychobillies.

Part two is broadcast on BBC 6 Music tomorrow.

Presenter/John Peel, Producer/Frank Wilson

BBC 6 Music Publicity

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BBC WORLD SERVICE Monday 30 March 2009

Obama's Pentagon

Monday 30 March
9.05-9.30am BBC WORLD SERVICE

The United States's 2008 military budget is more than half a trillion dollars – an eye-watering figure that does not include the supplementary budget for the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. In real terms, it's more than the spending at the height of the Vietnam War.

An increasing number of generals, politicians and strategists believe that this vast sum of money is not being well-spent and that too many greenbacks have been wasted on vastly expensive high-tech weapons systems. Pentagon advisor Thomas Barnett argues that, for too long, the approach has relied simply on superior firepower. "America's historic preference in war has always been for the complete annihilation of its enemies: We come; we kill; we leave."

Hugh Levinson asks whether the Pentagon can adjust to a changing world and if it should be split into a department for fighting wars and a department for everything else.

Presenter and Producer/Hugh Levinson

BBC World Service Publicity

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