Press Office

Wednesday 24 Sep 2014

Press Packs

Mixed Race Britain – facts

Full "Mixed" category was first introduced ten years ago
Categorisation for the full ‘Mixed’ group was introduced for the first time in 2001, before which there had been no reliable estimate of the size of the mixed race population (Source: Peter J Aspinall 2000).

Mixed Race is one of the fastest growing minority groups
Growth between 1991 and 2001 for mixed-race was 150% making it the fastest growing minority group. Currently the largest group is the Black Caribbean/White group, however the fastest growing group is Chinese/White. (Source: NS 2001).

The term "Mixed Race" is preferred by people of mixed ethnicity
Currently the preferred description mixed race people use themselves is "mixed race" (selected by over half the respondents) which was deemed not perfect but better than the rest. The only other terms that attracted some support were "mixed heritage", "mixed origins", and 2mixed parentage". Respondents identified around a dozen different terms as offensive, most frequently "half-caste", "biracial", "coloured", "half breed", and "dual heritage". The reasons for the dislike of terms like "biracial" and "dual heritage" were that they focussed mainly on its limitation to two groups. (Source: Peter J Aspinall, University of Kent, Mixed Race 2006)

Mixed Race are considered most beautiful
This was the conclusion of a major research study, the largest of its kind, undertaken by Dr Michael Lewis, (School of Psychology, Cardiff University) in March 2010.(Source: http://www.perceptionweb.com/abstract.cgi?id=p6626)

More British children living in mixed race families
Almost 10 per cent of children in the UK live in a family which describes itself as mixed race or multiple heritage. (Source: Lucinda Platt: Ethnicity & Family Relationships within and between ethnic groups. Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex).

Mixed Race at greater risk of violence
In 2002/03, adults from a Mixed Race or Asian background were more likely than those from other ethnic groups to be victims of crime in England and Wales. Almost half (46 per cent) of mixed race adults had been the victim of a crime. (Source: ONS 2003).

Black Caribbeans most likely of Minority Ethnic Groups (BME) to be in inter-ethnic relationships
Black Caribbean men and women were the most likely of any group to be in an inter-ethnic relationship (48% of black Caribbean men and 34 % of black Caribbean women were in inter-ethnic relationships) (Source: Lucinda Platt: Ethnicity & Family Relationships within and between ethnic groups. Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex).

Minority ethnic men mix more than minority ethnic women
Minority ethnic men from all groups are more likely to be in inter-ethnic relationships than minority ethnic women. The exception to this are Chinese women who are more likely to be in an inter ethnic relationship than Chinese men. (Source: Lucinda Platt: Ethnicity & Family Relationships within and between ethnic groups. Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex).

Legislation to prohibit race mixing has only recently been abolished in some parts of the world
In several parts of the world, including South Africa during the apartheid era, governments introduced legislation to prohibit race mixing. Laws against "miscegenation" were still in force in 16 American states until they were declared unconstitutional by the US Supreme Court's verdict in the Loving v Virginia case of 1967. (Source: Loving V Virginia).

To top

Press releases by date:

Press release by:

Related Press Office links

Related BBC links

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.