Press Office

Wednesday 29 Oct 2014

Egypt – What Lies Beneath

Egypt – What Lies Beneath

The Pyramids, the Sphinx and the tombs of the Pharaohs are all fabulous monuments to Egypt’s past. But according to one scientist, the astonishing antiquities already discovered are just a tiny percentage of what was left behind by the ancient Egyptians.

For the first time, techniques used for BBC One's Egypt – What Lies Beneath will reveal an ancient Egypt never before imagined, let alone seen.

From her Nasa-sponsored laboratory, Dr Sarah Parcak is using cutting-edge satellite technology to identify thousands of iconic sites that include lost tombs, temples and cities buried beneath the shifting sands.

As Sarah heads to Egypt to verify her findings, she will be joined by Liz Bonnin and Dallas Campbell (Bang Goes The Theory) for a remarkable voyage of discovery to solve some of the mysteries of ancient Egypt.

Using the latest visually-stunning CGI technology, the programme recreates landscapes and lost sites last seen of thousands of years ago.

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Hominid – Battle For The Planet

Hominid – Battle For The Planet

There are more then 6 billion people in the world today, a phenomenal success story – the most advanced form of life that has ever existed. But we are extremely fortunate to be here at all.

Thirty thousand years ago, there were at least three different species of human on Earth, including our ancestors, Homo Sapiens. The other hominid species had big brains and were stronger and more numerous than us. They had also occupied Europe and Asia for millions of years longer than we had. So, why, when we were the obvious candidates for extinction, did we survive and they didn't?

This two-part series for BBC One explores the fascinating story of the utterly unpredictable ascent of man. Based on the latest scientific research, each episode vividly dramatises how we met, interacted with and ultimately out-competed a different hominid rival to become the dominant species on the planet.

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The Trench

The Trench

Broadcaster and writer Fergal Keane examines the First World War, the conflict that defined the 20th century, using a fresh perspective – from above.

This special programme commemorating Remembrance Day on BBC One brings an epic chapter of history into focus using two unique historical finds – aerial photographs from the Imperial War Museum collection, developed for the first time since they were taken more than 90 years ago, and a piece of extraordinary archive footage. This newly discovered film, shot from an airship in the summer of 1919, loosely follows the route of the Western Front and captures the devastation in amazingly graphic detail. Showing Europe just months after the guns had fallen silent, it is a snapshot of time and history.

Key battles can be recreated using rich, data-driven CGI, offering viewers a bird's-eye view of the action as it happened.

Along the way, Fergal meets historians and visits key sites in Flanders and France to tell the incredible stories of battles won and lost, paying tribute to the soldiers and civilians who played their part, and highlighting the heroic stories of the pilots – the so-called Knights of the Air, who took to the skies to fight the enemy using cameras as well as guns.

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Operation Mincemeat

Operation Mincemeat

Best-selling author and journalist Ben Macintyre tells the extraordinary story of the boldest and most successful secret operation of the Second World War in a new BBC Two documentary based on his book, Operation Mincemeat.

In 1943, a top secret group within Naval Intelligence devised an audacious plan to deceive Hitler. The plot to fool the Führer was originally dreamed up by Ian Fleming, but this was no James Bond fantasy – Operation Mincemeat actually happened.

British agents procured the body of a Welsh tramp and attached to him a briefcase packed with false documents, including plans for a fictitious invasion of Greece. The body was then floated off the coast of Spain by submarine where the agents guessed it would fall into the hands of German spies.

The deception was an astonishing success. Hitler ordered entire divisions to transfer to Greece to await an invasion that never happened. Meanwhile, the Allies landed in Sicily, where they met with minimal resistance.

For more than 60 years, Operation Mincemeat has been shrouded in secrecy. Now, for the first time, Ben Macintyre reveals the true story of what happened – and how. Together with a cast of original witnesses and previously unseen archive, he reveals how one unlikely group of brilliant men and women came together to pull off one of the greatest deceptions in history.

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Our Secret Streets

Our Secret Streets

A new series for BBC Two, Our Secret Streets is history in microcosm told through the stories of six London streets and charting more than 100 years of radical and unpredictable social change.

In 1886, philanthropist and social researcher Charles Booth embarked on a truly epic project – to map the social conditions of every street, every house and every family in the whole of London. It was one of the most comprehensive social surveys ever conducted, and this series updates his work, shedding new light on social mobility in contemporary Britain.

Making shocking discoveries and unexpected connections that traverse social and economic boundaries, viewers will see what happens when lawyers move out of an area and criminals move in, and when no-go areas become the enclaves of the rich and famous.

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BBC Multiplatform

BBC Multiplatform

BBC Multiplatform offers audiences a rounded view on the many sides and interpretations of historical events at bbc.co.uk/history. Beginning with the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Britain, the site will feature the best of the BBC's archive, including recent history clips as well as rare video and audio.

The video and audio will cater to those new to the subject as well as history enthusiasts. The Battle of Britain is the first part of an overhaul of the BBC History online offering. The Multiplatform team will continue to release BBC video and audio online, guided by the editorial priorities across BBC Knowledge, the subjects on which the BBC has distinctive material and the areas of history that are most important to audiences.

BBC Multiplatform will also be trailblazing the Media Literacy initiative with the accessibility and design of the pages on bbc.co.uk/history, and will link to outlets beyond the BBC.

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