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29 October 2014
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The Cup 
Ranjit Kaskar (Nazim Khan) and Dr Kaskar (Pal Aron). © Hartswood Films/Matt Squire

The Cup – a six-part comedy series for BBC Two



Pal Aron plays Dr Kaskar


Pal Aron – most familiar to television audiences for his regular appearances as Sonny in Coronation Street, DC Brandon Kane in The Bill and Adam Osman in Casualty – thoroughly enjoyed playing Dr Kaskar in The Cup.

 

He says: "Of course it's the script that initially gets you excited. It's really funny and that I think comes from the honesty in the characters; the fact that it's so character driven and the humour comes from the situations they find themselves in."

 

Dr Kaskar is a gynaecologist in Bolton and is hugely ambitious for his footballing son Ranjit, locked in a constant battle with rival dad Terry.

 

Pal explains: "Ranjit is the joint leading goal scorer with Malky [Terry's son]. As a result of this, Terry and Dr Kaskar are deadly rivals, constantly fighting and bickering with a lot of one-upmanship, whereas the kids get on well, love the game, have other hobbies and interests and are basically altogether more grown up than their parents."

 

And Pal doubts he will follow his character's lead when it comes to raising his own small son.

 

He laughs: "Can you imagine the incredible pressure Ranjit is put under by his father?

 

"My boy is only 15 months old and I am looking forward to kicking a ball around with him, but I wouldn't dream of treating him like that.

 

"Also, I'm not a big fan of football. I'll watch important matches but only in the company of others and with a drink in my hand!

 

"But hopefully a lot of the audience will be the same. They might learn something from the series and be able to relate to the situations; in life we laugh because something is funny and we laugh because it rings true."

 

Despite not being interested in football, Pal's especially enjoyed filming the football scenes.

 

He explains: "Luckily I'm not expected to play football properly – that's the responsibility of the kids!

 

"There was a fantastic scene when they had rain machines in and Terry and I were covered in mud, taking penalties against each other and it was just such fun!"

 

He continues: "My character is hugely ambitious in absolutely everything that he does.

 

"He breathes success whether it's football, the arts or anything really – he just wants always to be the best he can.

 

"In fact his son's name, Ranjit, means 'victorious' which is a happy coincidence as the writers didn't know; they just chose the name because they liked it. They seemed really pleased when I told them what it actually meant."

 

Pal is full of admiration for the children in the series: "The kids are fantastic because they enjoyed the experience of filming The Cup so much and really wanted to give it their best shot every time.

 

"Matt the director would tell them to have a knockabout for 20 minutes and the amount of energy he got back from them was amazing – they all seemed to genuinely love it and love playing football.

 

"Haylie, who plays Ali – the only girl in the team – is absolutely fearless at football; she goes for every tackle and gets 100% involved – brilliant."

 

Pal was a fan of the documentary style as well: "I'm new to this style of working but it's been fun to do.

 

"The main challenge is to try and make it look realistic – it's a mock documentary so the characters know that there's a camera trained on them.

 

"As the story continues you see the characters becoming more confident in front of the camera – trying to make it look real was the biggest challenge."

 


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