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24 September 2014
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BBC FOUR Spring / Summer 2005
Rageh Omaar presents An Islamic History Of Europe

BBC FOUR - from cult to culture

Spring and Summer 2005



Introduction


BBC FOUR's spring and summer gets underway with a true televisual treat - a live production of the sci-fi classic, The Quatermass Experiment.


The Quatermass Experiment was a television phenomenon, attracting huge audiences when it burst into British homes in 1953.


It brought science fiction to the small screen for the first time and its eponymous lead character became the UK's first TV hero.


Introducing the new season Janice Hadlow, Controller of BBC FOUR, said: "I am thrilled that we're bringing Quatermass back to life. Playing as part of the finale to TV on Trial - BBC FOUR's quest to find the golden age of TV - it's wonderful to have one of the first 'must-watch' TV experiences that inspired the water cooler chat of its day.


"I hope fans of the original series, as well as a new generation, will be gripped as Professor Bernard Quatermass races to save the world.


"And for the channel to broadcast the first live BBC television drama for over 20 years is an added treat."


Announcing details of the new season on the channel's third birthday, Janice Hadlow said: "BBC FOUR has come a long way in three years; we've achieved critical acclaim, industry awards and a growing loyal audience. I hope in the coming season - and beyond - to build on these successes as we continue to bring ambitious, intelligent and engaging programmes - across all genres - to our viewers."


She added: "Absorbing and thought-provoking documentaries have always been key to the BBC FOUR schedule and this season features a mix of pieces which I'm sure will prove as popular as some of those which have already played in the first two months of 2005.


"This season also sees the channel build on recent successes in drama and comedy."


In An Islamic History Of Europe Rageh Omaar travels across Europe to trace the hidden story of the continent's Islamic past revealing the vibrant civilisation that Muslims brought to the West.


Animation Nation explores a century of British animation, from its origins as a Victorian theatrical diversion to the multimillion-dollar Hollywood financed feature films of today and reveals how the genre has continued to be a vital tool in both consumer advertising and government propaganda.


The Indian railway network is the largest in the world. In a beautifully filmed, panoramic sweep, Indian Rail explores the stories of some of the 13 million people whose lives depend on the Indian Railway - from government ministers to street boys.


April 2005 marks the 60th anniversary of Hitler's death. In a short season, BBC FOUR examines Hitler's Helpers with revealing films on Joseph Goebbels and Albert Speer.


In drama, a treat for the coming season is a new adaptation of Patrick Hamilton's acclaimed trilogy, Twenty Thousand Streets Under The Sky.


Adapted by Kevin Elyot, the tale of unrequited love set against the backdrop of Thirties London stars Bryan Dick, Zoë Tapper, Sally Hawkins and Phil Davis.


In new British comedy on BBC FOUR this season comes The Thick Of It directed and devised by Armando Iannucci.


Chris Langham, Peter Capaldi and Chris Addison star in this satirical series set in the world of British politics.


Other highlights this season include:


Dickens in America: Miriam Margolyes, actress and passionate Dickens fan, traces the footsteps of the author's journeys across the United States.


Poulson: John Poulson was a man once revered for his revolutionary architectural vision, instrumental in re-building post-war Britain.


Now his name is synonymous with the worst excess of Sixties architecture and he is remembered as the central figure in a huge corruption scandal that rocked Britain.


Rehab: from the team who brought Care House to BBC FOUR comes this moving and intimate film that follows residents of rehab clinic Phoenix House, through their life-changing six-month rehabilitation programme.


Music: This summer BBC FOUR will be at the BBC Proms bringing live coverage throughout the season; the channel continues documentary profiles of an eclectic mix of music legends including Ivor Cutler, Georgie Fame and Dick Gaughan; and, as part of a Beethoven season, world renowned conductor Daniel Barenboim gives a masterclass.


World Cinema: highlights this season include Uzak, the tale of an Istanbul photographer who, while suffering a mid-life crisis, has to put up his country cousin who's searching for work; Osama is the story of life under Taleban rule in Afghanistan, in which a mother is driven to disguise her daughter as a boy so that they can find a way to survive; and Memories Of Murder is set against the backdrop of South Korea in 1986, under the military dictatorship, where two rural policeman and a detective from the capital are sent to investigate a series of brutal rapes and murders.


Notes to Editors


BBC FOUR viewing figures:


In 2005 so far, BBC FOUR has been reaching an average of 8.8 per cent of all digital viewers each week (three-minute threshold)


This equates to 3.1 million viewers every week, up +19 per cent on the same weeks in 2004


Since the last quarter of 2004, BBC FOUR has been watched by at least 8 million people each month (three-minute reach)


Quatermass


The Quatermass Experiment - transmitted in 1953, Professor Quatermass was played by Reginald Tate. Of the original, only episodes one and two (out of six) were recorded.


Quatermass II - transmitted in 1955, Professor Quatermass was played by John Robinson. The full series was recorded.


Quatermass & The Pit - transmitted in 1957, Professor Quatermass was played by André Morell. The full series was recorded.


The Quatermass Experiment was remade by Hammer Studios in 1955 for cinema release.


BBC FOUR SPRING/SUMMER 2005:

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