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29 October 2014
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02.05.02


BBCi


BBCi Search promises to be a real find for users

A key part of BBCi's mission has always been to offer a trusted guide to the Web. Over the years we've helped thousands of people to use the Internet through our WebWise training and through our WebGuide to the best sites on the Web.

Now, with 80 per cent of those asked believing that current search engines could be better, according to a recent NOP survey, BBCi is developing its role as a trusted guide by launching BBCi Search - a unique facility that draws upon the BBC's unrivalled editorial expertise and reputation as the UK's most trusted online brand – to enable users to get what they want from the Net, free from commercial pressures and safe from undesirable sites.


By making it easier for users to find what they want, the BBC hopes to increase users' enjoyment of the web and encourage more people to spend time online, driving digital take up, in line with the BBC's existing strategy.


Available from the homepage of bbc.co.uk, BBCi Search lets you type in your keywords without the need for quotation marks or plus signs. Results are provided based on the editorial relevance to these keywords, with recommended sites appearing at the top of the list.


Ashley Highfield, Director, BBC New Media says: "It is quite clear that the current search marketplace doesn't serve Internet users as well as it could. The BBC, with its 80 years of know-how and editorial expertise, and its mission to offer a trusted guide to the Web, is ideally placed to provide a UK focused search engine that will not be influenced by paid for results.


"Given that 90% of respondents to the independent survey stated that they would use the BBC search engine, and that a similar number said they would prefer impartial search, it is evidently something that people want."


The BBCi/NOP survey also reported that more than half (64%) of those questioned were frustrated by the amount of American websites and advertisers they came across whilst searching on the web. At the same time, 88% of respondents said, given the choice, they would use an Internet search engine that helped to find the best British websites, as well as foreign ones.



Taking this into account, BBCi Search jointly delivers UK and foreign websites but with hierarchical preference being given to the most relevant UK websites. Should they wish to, however, users do have the option to isolate UK only search results.


As well as providing the most relevant results free of advertisements and commercial pressures, BBCi Search also addresses parental concerns regarding children accessing pornographic/derogatory websites. Sophisticated software is used to remove such material from the search database, enabling BBCi to provide the most family friendly search facility on the web.
BBCi Search will be accompanied by an on air marketing campaign beginning 4 May 2002.


Notes to Editors


BBCi Search launches on 2 May 2002 and can be accessed from the bbc.co.uk homepage.


Results can be filtered to look across the whole of the World Wide Web or can be narrowed down to look only across the BBCi news and sport sites, or the whole of the BBCi site.


Research conducted by NOP during 12-14 April 2002. Almost 500 interviews were carried out. The sample was weighted in line with national demographic profile and was designed to be representative of all adults in GB.


BBCi is the name for the BBC's interactive services working across the web, interactive TV and handheld devices. BBCi provides a single signpost and easier way of getting to the BBC's great information, entertainment and education services, no matter how you choose to access it.


BBCi incorporates BBC Online which received Government approval in 1998 with part of its mission being to "act as a trusted guide to the Web".


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