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24 September 2014
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23.05.02

Robot Wars Activated on Xbox


Following the success of its acclaimed versions of Robot Wars on PlayStation 2, PC and Game Boy, BBC Multimedia is publishing a heavy metal successor - Robot Wars - Extreme Destruction.


Published on PC and Game Boy Advance and, in a first for BBC Multimedia, for the Xbox, for Christmas 2002 this all-action sequel is set to deliver a whole new Robot-battling experience.


The first round of games has been a huge success, selling 250,000 units in 2001 across PC, PlayStation 2 and Game Boy - demonstrating the popularity of cross platform development and the Robot Wars phenomenon.


In just over 4 years the Robot Wars TV series has grown from cult status to become a massive worldwide phenomenon, with the BBC show now attracting a weekly audience of around four million viewers. Taking its cue from the latest series, Robot Wars - Extreme Destruction cranks up the action with new events, new robots, new arenas and a wide range of new game features.


The game brings together all the elements of the TV show - players can design and build their own robots, drawing upon a database of body parts, armour, engines, wheels and weapons. Once complete, battle can commence!


The game also features a quick start 'pick up and play' function, so gamers can select from a range of pre-built robots, and get straight to the realistic 3D action, which includes:

  • New and improved 3D arenas; While players of the PC and Xbox versions can battle it out on an aircraft carrier, in a car factory, on a military base or atop a skyscraper, GBA players can fight around a desert outpost, sub-zero station, iron foundry or an acid factory.
  • 10 different game types; including Robot football and sumo competitions.
  • More robots; The RefBot oversees the destruction, while the most popular of the US robots and a range of new competitor robots join the fray.
  • Split screen play; PC players can battle against each other on a split screen mode, while tournaments on the Xbox reach new heights with a four way split screen mode. With the use of a link cable, GBA Roboteers can fight one another across the variety of 3D landscapes.
  • Trade weapons and robot parts; With secret component stores unlocked by successful play, the Game Boy Advance version of Extreme Destruction includes the ability to trade rare weapons and useful Robot body parts with other players via a link cable - the ultimate goal is to find all the parts to the mythical Gold Robot!


ROBOT WARS - EXTREME DESTRUCTION
Cat. Number:

Xbox: BBCXBX001
PC CD-ROM: BBCMM054
GBA: BBCGBA002

Release Date: November 2002


PC System Req: Pentium III 500 Mhz or 500 AMD Athlon or 100% equivalent processor, Windows 98/ME/XP, 128Mb RAM, 8x speed CD or equivalent DVD drive, DirectX compatible, 16 bit sound card, 16Mb graphics card (capable of running DirectX 8.1).


Notes to Editors:
BBC Multimedia, the software publishing division of BBC Worldwide, publishes console and PC games, as well as interactive entertainment products for mobile and other platforms. In addition, BBC Multimedia creates children's and reference titles for PC and consoles. All the company's interactive products are developed with an emphasis on innovation, entertainment, creativity, learning and the quality the BBC is renowned for. You can find out more about its catalogue of titles on the BBC Multimedia website - www.bbcmultimedia.com.


BBC Worldwide, the commercial arm of the BBC, generates income to support the UK licence fee by marketing programme-related products and services around the world. It is self-funding and exists to provide supplementary funding for the BBC's public services. In 2000/01, BBC Worldwide provided cashflow to the BBC of £96 million. Its ambition is to quadruple cashflow to the BBC during the current Charter period. BBC Worldwide is financially separate from the rest of the BBC and receives no public funding.




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