BBC navigation

As provações enfrentadas por um ginasta

Atualizado em  26 de junho, 2012 - 07:42 (Brasília) 10:42 GMT

Player

Conheça dura rotina de treinos de britânico Louis Smith; acompanhe reportagem em inglês.

Assistirmp4

Para executar este conteúdo em Java você precisa estar sintonizado e ter a última versão do Flash player instalada em seu computador.

Formatos alternativos

Script



Presenter

Hi I'm Natalie and welcome to Talking Sport.

Today we’re hearing about a male gymnast and learning the word 'prove'.

Louis Smith is a male gymnast from the UK.

He is known for performing on the pommel horse.

At the last Olympics in Beijing he won a bronze medal.

Mike Bushell has been to meet Louis ahead of this year's Olympic games.

Listen for how many days a week Louis trains for and listen for the word 'prove'.

Clip

You know sometimes Louis Smith says he finds it hard to get up in the morning – his body is that sore. It was certainly worth it in Beijing 2008 when he became the first British gymnast since 1928 to win an Olympic medal. 19 years of hard work, training 6 days a week, twice a day, 32 hours a week for just 50 seconds to prove what everyone has been working towards.

Presenter

Listen again for how many days a week Louis trains for and listen for the word 'prove'.

Clip

You know sometimes Louis Smith says he finds it hard to get up in the morning – his body is that sore. It was certainly worth it in Beijing 2008 when he became the first British gymnast since 1928 to win an Olympic medal. 19 years of hard work, training 6 days a week, twice a day, 32 hours a week for just 50 seconds to prove what everyone has been working towards.

Presenter

Did you hear how many days a week Louis trains for?

Yes he trains for 6 days a week.

"19 years of hard work, training 6 days a week"

Did you hear the word 'prove'?

On screen

prove

provar

Presenter

"training 6 days a week, twice a day, 32 hours a week for just 50 seconds to prove what everyone has been working towards"

Well we have heard about Louis and learnt the word 'prove'. Now let's hear from some people in London. Listen to them using the word 'prove'.

Vox pops

Athletes at the Olympics want to prove they are the best in their sport.

I hope my exam results prove I am a very good student.

In science we have to prove our theories.

On screen

Athletes at the Olympics want to prove they are the best in their sport.

I hope my exam results prove I am a very good student.

In science we have to prove our theories.

Presenter

I'm Natalie and that’s all from Talking Sport.

See you next time.


Phrasal verbs with 'get'

In the video we heard that Louis Smith finds it hard to 'get up' in the morning:

"You know sometimes Louis Smith says he finds it hard to get up in the morning – his body is that sore."

Below are some phrasal verbs with 'get':

get by: to be able to survive on minimal resources

get away: to go somewhere on holiday

get on: to like someone and be friendly with them

get about: to have mobility

Now complete the sentences with the correct phrase from above. The form of the phrase may need to be changed.

1. I really need to __________ for a week or two. I need a break.

2. My elderly mother is finding it hard to __________ recently. She has a bad foot.

3. We don't have much money at the moment but we should have enough to __________.

4. I __________ really well with my sister-in-law.


'Worth' phrases

In the video the reporter said that Louis Smith's hard training had been 'worth it':

"It was certainly worth it in Beijing 2008 when he became the first British gymnast since 1928 to win an Olympic medal."

'Worth it' means that the value of winning was equal to the time and effort of training.

Below are some phrases with 'worth':

be worth its weight in gold: something/one extremely valuable or useful

for what it's worth: used before stating an opinion or information that may not be useful or correct

be worth your while: to do something in which the value of the outcome is equal to the time you give to it

not worth the paper it's written on: an agreement or contract that holds no value or importance

Now complete the sentences with the correct phrase from above. The form of the phrase may need to be changed.

1. I think it is _______________________ getting house insurance before you move in to

your new home.

2. That contract is _______________________. It is not legally correct.

3. _______________________ I think we should find new jobs.

4. Sarah is a brilliant employee. I don’t know what we would do without her. She really is

_______________________.


Answers


Phrasal verbs with 'get'

1. I really need to get away for a week or two. I need a break.

2. My elderly mother is finding it hard to get about recently. She has a bad foot.

3. We don't have much money at the moment but we should have enough to get by.

4. I get on really well with my sister-in-law.

2) 'Worth' phrases

1. I think it is worth your while getting house insurance before you move in to your new home.

2. That contract is not worth the paper it's written on. It is not legally correct.

3. For what it's worth I think we should find new jobs.

4. Sarah is a brilliant employee. I don’t know what we would do without her. She really is

worth her weight in gold.

BBC © 2014 A BBC não se responsabiliza pelo conteúdo de sites externos.

Esta página é melhor visualizada em um navegador atualizado e que permita o uso de linguagens de estilo (CSS). Com seu navegador atual, embora você seja capaz de ver o conteúdo da página, não poderá enxergar todos os recursos que ela apresenta. Sugerimos que você instale um navegados mais atualizado, compatível com a tecnologia.