From Our Own Correspondent

From Our Own Correspondent

Insight, wit and analysis as BBC correspondents, journalists and writers take a closer look at the stories behind the headlines. Presented by Kate Adie on BBC Radio 4 and Pascale Harter on the BBC World Service. For a full list of programme broadcast times go to bbc.co.uk/fromourowncorrespondent

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All episodes (341)

  • FOOC Dec 20, 2014: The Heaviest Coffin

    Sat, 20 Dec 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Story-telling from the world of news and current affairs. In this edition: Shaimaa Khalil on the mood in Peshawar after the Taliban attack on a school in which more than a hundred children were killed; Barbara Plett-Usher on how Cubans are reacting to the prospect of improved relations with the United States; Quentin Sommerville visits the Iraqi army frontline as it tries to stop the militants from Islamic State seizing strategic Anbar province; Malcolm Billings is in a little-known Anglican place of worship hidden away in a web of cobbled streets in Istanbul and Hugh Schofield's doing some seasonal research involving whisky and chocolate biscuits in a remote corner of central France.

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  • FOOC Dec 13 2014: A New Empire

    Sat, 13 Dec 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Story-telling from the world of news and current affairs. 'For God, Tsar and Nation'. That's the motto of some of those fighting with the pro-Russia separatists in eastern Ukraine. Tim Whewell's been to talk to them about their dreams of a new Orthodox autocratic state; Mary Harper, in Mogadishu, has been finding out why there's a love affair going on between Somalia and Turkey; South Koreans are big believers in plastic surgery but Steve Evans, in Seoul, says there are now negative headlines after a string of news reports about botched operations; Bangladesh is known as a prolific producer of clothes for the mass market but Caroline Eden's been discovering it also makes saris so fine they're highly coveted and hugely expensive. And after more than a quarter of a century Justin Marozzi has mixed feelings as he bids farewell to the Moroccan town regarded as being the hashish capital of the world.

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  • FOOC Dec 06: Spies are Everywhere

    Sat, 6 Dec 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Reporters tell their stories: in this edition, Carrie Gracie travels to China's most troubled region Xinjiang - it's in the midst of a crackdown on what the authorities describe as 'terrorism driven by religious extremism'. Fergal Keane, just back from Ukraine, examines the circumstances which led to one of Europe's bloodiest conflicts in decades. Mike Wendling's in the United States where a campaign to persuade the Washington Redskins football team to change its name is gathering pace. Will Ross is in north eastern Nigeria where bows and arrows, magic and ancient hunting rifles are now being used in the battle against the Boko Haram jihadists. And David Mazower's at a festival in Poland where it's clear a growing number of Poles feel profound loss about the Jewish nation in their midst which was ripped apart in the Second World War.

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  • FOOC 29 Nov 2014: The Buckwheat Barometer

    Sat, 29 Nov 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Despatches. Steve Rosenberg sets out to discover who the Russian public holds responsible for rising prices and the ailing rouble? Owen Bennett Jones has a series of encounters in Tunis which offer clues to the direction in which the country's heading. Germany takes in more refugees than any other EU country - Jenny Hill in Munich says it's costing a huge amount and there's uncertainty over who will pay the bills. The giant tortoises on the Galapagos Islands may be used to playing a long game but Horatio Clare, who's just been visiting, says the islands' human residents are having to prepare for change. And Carolyn Brown has been finding out why a steady stream of travellers is choosing to stop off at a small town in the north of France

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  • FOOC Nov 22 2014: Swimming in Iran

    Sat, 22 Nov 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Foreign correspondents. Nick Thorpe on the Russian speakers in Ukraine who want the future of their country linked to western Europe, not to Moscow; Thomas Fessy examines how the Islamist fighters of Boko Haram are extending their operations out of Nigeria into neighbouring Cameroon; Shaimaa Khalil in Karachi on the difficulties and the dangers health workers face trying to convince people to be immunised against polio; Chris Bockman in Montpellier has been learning what an exiled Syrian billionaire has to do with the local rugby club and what's the correct etiquette for an American woman keen for a swim in Iran? Amy Guttman has been finding out.

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  • FOOC Nov 15 2010: An End to Education

    Sat, 15 Nov 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Despatches from correspondents worldwide. In this edition: Mishal Husain's in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley talking to refugees from the war in Syria and learning how a generation of Syrian children is no longer able to go to school; the waters off Somalia aren't the world's piracy hotspot any more - Mary Harper's been finding out how Nigeria's trying to counter an upsurge in maritime crime off the west African coast; with towns and cities expanding across India, Anu Anand has been seeing how animal habitats are being gobbled up, and it's the animals who're suffering; Victoria Gill is in Malawi where powerful motorbikes are now helping out in the country's battle against HIV/AIDS and ... empty that hot tub, do NOT fill the jacuzzi: David Willis says desperate times call for desperate measures in California, now in its third year of drought.

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  • FOOC Nov 13 2014: The Missing Students

    Thu, 13 Nov 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Despatches from around the world. In this edition: Will Grant on the protests in Mexico City as families try to find out what happened to a group of students seized by the police; the Indian prime minister may have called for more protection for the country's women but Razia Iqbal, in Western Harayana, says many still suffer appalling violence; what's Qatar really up to in Syria? Frank Gardner sets out over a flat featureless desert in his attempt to find out; Hamilton Wende visits the casbah in Algiers and explains why he finds it filled 'with half-remembered pockets of history and of war' and where in these islands is the very best place to take a look at Venus and Mars? Christine Finn boarded a ferry and went to find out.

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  • FOOC Nov 8 2014: Jerusalem On Edge

    Sat, 8 Nov 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Foreign correspondents. Today, Kevin Connolly on tension in Jerusalem:- a reminder, he says, that the very thing that makes the city one of the glories of human civilisation makes it difficult and dangerous too; a walk through the Menin Gate towards Flanders fields - Chris Haslam on the storm of commercialisation sweeping through the memorial sites of World War One; some of the Russian republics want independence but Mark Stratton, travelling through the Middle Volga lowlands, finds others happy to be part of Moscow's empire; students in India have been talking to Craig Jeffrey about their right to cheat in university exams and as Berlin marks the anniversary of the Wall coming down, Jenny Hill tells us the story of one young couple's 'forbidden journey'.

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  • FOOC 06 Nov 2014: Talking to Ghosts

    Thu, 6 Nov 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Reporters. Today, from Sierra Leone: why covering the Ebola outbreak is an assignment like no other, Andrew Harding; did the now-deposed leader of Burkina Faso ignore warning signs that an extension to his rule wouldn't be tolerated, Chris Simpson; Malta's an island rich in history and heritage, but it isn't only rooted in the past, Juliet Rix; Germany has its own views on immigration - official policy says the incomers must be made welcome, Jenny Hill; Germany and Korea were once BOTH divided countries; Steve Evans who's lived in Berlin and in Seoul finds these are nations which have much in common, yet they're very different too.

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  • FOOC Nov 01 2014: The Ghosts of old Naples

    Sat, 1 Nov 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Reporters. Today: Alan Johnston on the richness of the past lying in the bones of the buildings in the historic heart of old Naples; Hugh Sykes in a minibus taxi in Tunis after an election which proved a victory for the secularists; Shaimaa Khalil in Lahore visits a palace of beauty which has been forced to face up to some ugly attitudes; Jon Donnison in Sydney talks to Muslims about the wave of Islamophobic attacks in cities across Australia; James Coomarasamy meets an unconventional mayor in Kentucky as the USA gears up for the mid-term elections

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  • FOOC 30 Oct 2014: The Most Dangerous Job in th World?

    Thu, 30 Oct 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents'despatches: Gabriel Gatehouse with the medical team who have collected hundreds of Ebola patients from their homes in the Liberian capital, Monrovia; Andrew Hosken on the extraordinary efforts made by the people of Baghdad to clear up amidst a new wave of bombings; once a part of the Austro-Hungarian empire, the city of Trieste now has an independence movement which believes the place would be better off severing its ties to Rome - Tara Isabella Burton's been there to listen to their argument; how can a herd of cows indicate the economic health of a nation? It's a question Damien McGuinness has been addressing in the German capital, Berlin; and three-solid-meals-a-day man James Jeffrey's been getting to know about the extreme fasting traditions of Ethiopia.

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  • FOOC 25 Oct 2014: The Flying River

    Sat, 25 Oct 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Reporters around the world. Misha Glenny says surely it's a national emergency -- but it's one the candidates in Brazil's election campaign have largely ignored. The civil war drags on in South Sudan - Tristan McConnell visits a town that's changed hands, between government troops and rebels, six times and has left its people shattered. Chris Morris was with the sub-hunters on the Stockholm Archipelago. They didn't find a submarine, but it's clear there are security implications. Who do you call when you see little green men in the sky? In France, you can phone the government, as Chris Bockman's been finding out. And Bethany Bell has been visiting a lake which is much-loved in Austria and not just because of its unique rose-scented breezes.

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  • FOOC 23 Oct 2014: Home Grown Heroes

    Thu, 23 Oct 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    War may still be raging in the east, but Ukraine's gearing up for elections -- and Jamie Coomarasamy says there are some unexpected candidates; Michael Bristow in Indonesia meets a former jihadist who now works for the government and has become something of a celebrity; not far from California's information hub, Silicon Valley, an old Native American language faces extinction - Caroline Davies explains why it's being allowed to go; a civil war rumbles on in South Sudan -- James Copnall's been meeting some who were forced to flee into the bush, living off wild animals and water lilies; the European Union's spent billions on programmes aimed at integrating the Roma people, but many remain out on the margins of society, as Lucy Irvine's been finding out in Bulgaria.

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  • FOOC 18 Oct 2014: Spectres of Afghanistan

    Sat, 18 Oct 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The past looms large over Afghanistan's new leader -- Fergal Keane says the scale of the task he faces is immense; as civil war rages in Libya, Tim Whewell finds a corner of calm and tolerance amid a country full of discord and violence. Do institutions like the European Union make nationhood increasingly irrelevant? That was on Martin Buckley's mind in Corsica where an armed struggle for independence seems to be losing support. As Tehran and the West sit down to talk about Iran's nuclear ambitions, Diana Darke's been finding out how Iranians revel in the words of a poet who's been dead for six hundred years. And Hugh Schofield knows how to unearth the secrets of a stately home with a history -- he asked the butler!!

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  • FOOC 16 Oct 2014: Rio Rubbish

    Thu, 16 Oct 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents' tales: why they're arguing about Macchiavelli on a rubbish tip in Rio as the second round of the Brazilian election approaches, Neil Trevithick; Shaimaa Khalil investigates the upsurge in violence on the India/Pakistan border in Kashmir; Julia Macfarlane accompanies a group of British doctors who've gone to help out Palestinian medics in Gaza; has the historic city of Timbuktu recovered from a brutal period of conflict and occupation by Islamic extremists? Chris Simpson has been finding out. And the Star Wars film crew have been to the remote Irish island of Skellig Michael and so too has our man Vincent Dowd.

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  • FOOC Oct 11 2014: The Battle for Hong Kong

    Sat, 11 Oct 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    'Caught between the demands of the masses and the stern imperatives of Beijing's control': Fergal Keane on the Hong Kong authorities' reaction to the demonstrations which have brought parts of the territory to a standstill. Nick Thorpe is in Bulgaria hearing ever-louder demands for a new European union, this one to be centred on Moscow. A spotlight on La Paz - Katy Watson's in the extraordinary capital of Bolivia as people prepare to vote in a general election. The verdant hill town of Zomba in Malawi is said to be one of the most attractive places in the heart of Africa -- but Jonathan Fryer's been learning that, for many locals, making a living's not easy. And Horatio Clare's in the Danube Delta's archipelago of waters, marshes and sighing trees listening to stories of conservation, propagation and extinction.

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  • FOOC Oct 9 2014: A Tap You Can't Turn Off

    Thu, 9 Oct 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The European Union's announced plans to support, but not replace, efforts being made by Italy to save lives at sea. Emma Jane Kirby's been to the port town of Syracusa to see the difficulties the Italians have been facing. Will Ross has been meeting children in Nigeria who've been separated from their parents by the war against the militants of Boko Haram. What's it like when a family discovers that a loved one's gone to fight with extremists in the Middle East? Linda Pressly's been finding out in Kosovo. Jamie Coomarasamy's been to the west of Ukraine, hundreds of miles from the fighting in the east of the country, to find out what they think there of the struggle between government forces and the pro-Russia rebels. And the hair industry is big business in China and most of the customers, as Sam Piranty has been finding out, are Africans. But is that human hair they're buying or something else?

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  • FOOC 04 Oct 2014: Three Questions for Mr Leung

    Sat, 4 Oct 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The questions arising from a week of protest in Hong Kong are asked by the BBC's China editor Carrie Gracie; the Yangon River in Burma, now Myanmar, doesn't have the mightiest of reputations. But on its banks lay one of the world's most cosmopolitan cities. Andrew Whitehead caught the ferry to see how Rangoon, as it used to be known, looks in today's era of political and economic change; Lyse Doucet is in Baghdad, the Iraqi capital where residents heard this week the militants from Islamic State were only a few miles away; the Turkish parliament has voted to take the fight to IS and Mark Lowen's been to the border between Turkey and Syria to consider the consequences; Wyre Davies is covering the Brazilian election and wonders if it can be won by the environmentalist daughter of a rubber tapper from the Amazon jungle.

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  • FOOC 02 Oct 2014: A New Egypt

    Thu, 2 Oct 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Global despatches: some are pleased at what President al-Sisi's achieved in his first months in office in Egypt - others say that when it comes to repression, he's outdoing even his hardline predecessor Hosni Mubarak. Predicting what's about to happen in President Putin's Russia has become difficult now the country seems to have embraced an 'anything goes' philosophy. We're in the far north of Sweden learning that the Sami people believe widespread mining will ruin their traditional lands. The introduction of some democracy in Myanmar and the lifting of some western sanctions has not brought the predicted business boom, but for many citizens, the quality of life is slowly improving; and the sad story of the lonely baboon who's become trapped on a river island in Zimbabwe and is resisting all attempts to reunite him with his family.

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  • FOOC 27 Sept 2014: Fractured Syllogisms

    Sat, 27 Sep 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Despatches from around the world: Kevin Connolly on how Western policy makers, trying to respond to developments in the Middle East, are grappling with difficulties created by their own predecessors. As American warships prepared to fire missiles at targets in Syria, out in the Pacific Ocean two US carrier battle groups were carrying out the biggest live fire exercise in years. Rupert Wingfield-Hayes wondered if they had a target in mind. Iona Craig on a revolution in Yemen and how the nation was surprised when a previously marginalised militia group swiftly seized control of the capital, Sana'a. The economic news just gets gloomier and gloomier in France. Hugh Schofield says one area everyone agrees should be confronted is the so-called regulated professions. And the mushrooms, aided by a long wet summer, have been bursting out in the woods in Hungary. Nick Thorpe has been out to pick them. But which ones will lift his dinner to gastronomic heights and which ones might kill?

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  • FOOC 25 Sept 2014: Taking Meat off the Menu

    Thu, 25 Sep 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Few French restaurants offer a menu without meat, so John Laurenson's been finding out why one of the country's top chefs has decided to do just that. Paul Adams explains why the government in the Ukrainian capital Kiev might have given up trying to seize back control of rebel-held eastern parts of the country. Misha Glenny talks of plans to establish a global parliament of city mayors taking powers away from 'tired old nation states'. One of Europe's most wanted men is thought to be hiding out in the mountains of central Greece - Jeff Maysh has been talking to people about this fugitive with a Robin Hood reputation and Antonia Quirke talks of Sicily where there's widespread exasperation about the corruption still pervasive in Italian society and where the Mafia continues to wield influence.

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  • FOOC Sept 20 2014: Why the Kissing's Had to Stop

    Sat, 20 Sep 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The kissing's had to stop in west Africa - a despatch from Mark Doyle about the Ebola crisis, which is now having a profound effect on people's lifestyles throughout the region. The United States Senate has approved President Obama's plan to arm and train moderate Syrian rebels to fight Islamic State militants - Jeremy Bowen, in Damascus, tells us this means a wide range of forces is lining up to combat the jihadists. Shabnam Mahmood's been to a society wedding in Pakistan - it was an opportunity to note some of the details of that country's social hierarchy. The controversial mayor of Toronto is in hospital battling cancer - Lee Carter says this latest chapter in Rob Ford's colourful life has brought a rare show of unity to a city Mr Ford was accused of dividing. And Will Grant tells us a story from the Latin American capital where the streets are clogged with vehicles yet many of the drivers haven't even taken a driving test!

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  • FOOC 13 Sept 2014: Domestic Strife

    Sat, 13 Sep 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Kate Adie introduces Correspondents' stories. This week Paul Wood hears warnings of civil war returning to Lebanon; Andrew Harding reflects on the Pistorius trial; Darius Barzagan can't get the images of MH17 out of his head; Niall O'Gallagher joins Catalans celebrating their National Day and calling for independence; and Lucy Ash meets Ivory Coast's most famous actress to talk about infidelity.

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  • FOOC 6 Sept 2014: The Silent Wards

    Sat, 6 Sep 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kate Adie introduces correspondents stories from around the world. This week Gabriel Gatehouse takes a nerve-wracking drive, trying to avoid IS forces in Iraq. Shahzeb Jillani explains what Pakistan's political turmoil is about; John Sweeney comes face to face with President Putin after 14 years of trying. Claudia Hammond discovers that many patients in Israel remain on life support for years; and Steve Evans has the story of how a German board game took off in the trenches of WW1.

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  • FOOC 30 Aug 2014: The Lucky Country

    Sat, 30 Aug 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Global despatches. In this edition, Australia's tough immigration policy comes under the spotlight as a group of asylum seekers goes to court; why the mark which writer Ernest Hemingway left on Paris is now beginning to disappear; how the militants of Islamic State have affected Kurdish dreams of a state of their own; the tourists have returned to the beaches of Greece but, we learn, there's one correspondent who might not be so welcome in the country. And we hear from the reporter who's had second thoughts about wearing the headscarf, or hijab.

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  • FOOC 23 Aug 2014: A Poet at War

    Sat, 23 Aug 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Foreign correspondents. Today: can a meeting of presidents halt the fighting in eastern Ukraine? Why the international health workers who've come to tackle the Ebola virus in west Africa are not always welcome. Deported from the US - and back home in Guatemala; why life is difficult for many of the returnees. On leaving Pakistan, there are many happy memories -- but none of them, one departing correspondent says, feature the national airline PIA. And it may be a cool damp summer in Switzerland, but the stories coming from parliament are distinctly hot and steamy.

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  • FOOC Aug 16 2014: A Shopping List for Cuba

    Sat, 16 Aug 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Despatches from correspondents: Why should the west intervene with aid or arms? It's a question asked by our reporter in northern Iraq. The six-year-olds in Gaza who've already lived through three wars. Awesome sights and stressful moments as the Panama Canal celebrates its centenary. The militants of al-Shabaab use film and social media to get their message across - they also like to telephone a certain BBC editor. And why did another reporter pack an orange bottle of cleaning fluid along with the tennis shoes? She talks of a frantic shopping run before a return to Cuba.

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  • FOOC Aug 09 2014: A Footnote to Conflict

    Sat, 9 Aug 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Foreign correspondents tell their stories - in this edition, discussions in Israel about the conflict in Gaza, Tim Whewell; why the Turkish prime minister seems set to become the country's new president, Natalie Martin; why Argentina's demanding that global financial systems be overhauled, Katy Watson; tourists start to return to parts of The Philippines battered by storms and an earthquake, Rajan Datar and Reggie Nadelson visits a seaside town on America's east coast where African Americans traditionally took their summer holidays.

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  • FOOC Aug 02 2014:

    Sat, 2 Aug 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Despatches by reporters around the world. In this edition, Chris Morris, who was in Gaza twenty years ago, returns to chronicle how things 'have got worse, much worse'. Claudia Hammond, in Cyprus, on the latest attempts to find out what happened to those who went missing decades ago during fighting between the island's Greek and Turkish communities; Tim Mansel is in Sierra Leone amid growing alarm over the spread of the Ebola virus in west Africa. Why a seagull observed in Vatican City could be a disturbing omen for peace - that's from Alan Johnston and Petroc Trelawny finds out where the newly-weds like to go in Guangzhou, one of China's fastest-developing cities.

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  • FOOC 26 July 2014: Last Night in Gaza

    Sat, 26 Jul 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents tell their stories: a week in Gaza, Paul Adams; on the night train from Kiev to Donetsk, Gabriel Gatehouse; trouble in the vineyards of Moldova, Stephen Sackur; how the US city which brought us Campbell's Soup fell into decline, Sophie Reid and how frugality set two German brothers on the road to super-riches, Steve Evans

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  • FOOC July 19, 2014: Whatever Happened to the War Song?

    Sat, 19 Jul 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Back in the days of the Vietnam War the airwaves were full of protest songs. Today, plenty of conflict, but none of those songs. Humphrey Hawksley's been to Nashville to find out why. Jeremy Bowen's just been to Gaza, Syria and Iraq and reflects on what the fighting there might achieve. Caroline Wyatt's been reporting on global conflicts for seven years in her role as BBC Defence Correspondent. One question she's frequently been asked about war is: was it all worth it? The Irish economy may once again be gathering strength, but John Murphy, in the west of the republic, finds that emigration is taking its toll on rural life. And how difficult is it to go off for a swim? In the Indian capital Delhi, as Anu Anand's been finding out, the answer is ... VERY difficult!

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  • FOOC July 17 2014: Fasting under Fire

    Thu, 17 Jul 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Despatches. In this edition: some of the families caught up in Israel's fight against Palestinian militants in Gaza. Out on patrol on the dimly-lit streets of Caracas - the city with the highest murder rate of any capital. Two months to go to the Scottish referendum:- so what happened when other nations set out to assert their identities, to run their own affairs? And we find out why there are absolutely no women enjoying one of the most spectacular views in all of Greece.

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  • July 12 2014: Watching the World Cup in the Woods

    Sat, 12 Jul 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    We join the German football fans watching the world cup in the middle of a forest. Also: Fighting corruption in China; the culture of silence in a Mexican town ravaged by violence; why the French would rather speak Latin; and Italy's oldest police force celebrates its 200th anniversary. Presented by Kate Adie.

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  • July 10 2014: Tennis in Baghdad

    Thu, 10 Jul 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Jeremy Bowen laments the loss of everyday freedoms in Baghdad; Hilary Andersson investigates the mistreatment of prison inmates with mental health problems in the UDA; Alex Preston ventures into the biggest jade market in the world in Mandalay; Diana Darke meets Syriac christians rebuilding communities in their ancestral homeland in southeast Turkey; and Alex Marshall goes 'dumb walking' with his smartphone in Tokyo.

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  • FOOC July 5 2014: Two Worlds Collide

    Sat, 5 Jul 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Reporting the world: correspondents with insight, colour and analysis from Baghdad, Kirkuk, Rome, Lahore and Paris

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  • FOOC July 3 2014: No More Boat People

    Thu, 3 Jul 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Global despatches: in this edition, why hunger is again taking hold in South Sudan - even after a plentiful harvest; Australia gets tough with asylum seekers -- and the problems pile up for those seeking a new life down under; how America's attachment to its First Amendment gives hate groups the freedom to disseminate their beliefs; we visit a cemetery in the Czech Republic: a place of awful history, but also one where you learn about a community determined to create a successful future for itself; and fine dining for only a few pounds? we meet a man in Chile dedicated to reviving his country's culinary heritage.

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  • FOOC June 28 2014: Hero or Villain?

    Sat, 28 Jun 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    June the 28th 1914 was the day Gavrilo Princip shot Archduke Ferdinand. It led to the start of the First World War. Allan Little considers why today's Sarajevo is divided over whether Princip was a hero or a terrorist. President al-Sisi's new regime in Cairo: Louisa Loveluck's been finding out whether Egyptians regret voting in a new era of authoritarianism. Brazil has one of the world's worst crack cocaine problems: Katy Watson's been to see a government project which is trying to address it. Aidan O'Donnell visits a sacred city in the Horn of Africa. It is also noted for its production of beer. And while India's new rulers are keen to promote the use of Hindi, Craig Jeffrey's been finding out that the English language is still omnipresent, creeping into even unexpected corners of everyday society.

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  • FOOC June 26 2014: The Consequences of History

    Thu, 26 Jun 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The foreign interventionists whose actions have contributed to today's violent events in Iraq. How Burmese rebels crash-landed a plane and then made off with its cargo of cash. Increasingly pressing challenges face the government of Kenya -- not least a drastic reduction in the number of people wanting to spend their holidays there. We are told that a refugee camp in Beirut might just be the best place to go and watch a match in the World Cup and find out why a village on the south coast of Spain is celebrating the life of the very English author Laurie Lee.

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  • FOOC June 21 2014: I Never Got to Florence

    Sat, 21 Jun 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Correspondents' stories. Few British go to the Italian seaside town of Alassio these days but the library created for them there is still going - just. Coffee prices are rocketing in Brazil and the producers in this country which traditionally produces 'an awful lot of coffee' are concerned. There's a despatch from Baghdad, the Iraqi capital which is now a target of ISIS and other Sunni rebels. The problems pile up for the French president -- but he takes time off to praise an artist who only ever paints in black. And from the USA, we find out what happened to Little Germany, once a thriving part of New York City. Today, little more than a distant memory.

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  • FOOC 19 June 2014: Dilemma for the US

    Thu, 19 Jun 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    'Getting rid of Saddam was the easy bit.' The problems stack up for the United States as fighting continues in Iraq. Elves have had a place in Icelandic folklore for more than a thousand years. We find out why they're treated with such respect. Also, how countries around the world are drawing lines on the map of Antarctica, carving up the ice with their territorial claims. The climbing season on Mount Everest comes to a close; we hear it's been one of the worst on record and what happened when a British woman living in Bulgaria offered work to a gypsy boy.

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  • FOOC June 14 2014: A Glimpse of the Future

    Sat, 14 Jun 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Two conflicting visions of the future present themselves on a visit to the Middle East; the Americans send in the drones to attack the Pakistani Taliban again -- what chance now of a negotiated peace? The long strike in South Africa's platinum mines may be ending, but the bitterness which has divided mining families will be long lasting; the president of Burundi is a keen footballer, we hear, but is it a surprise that he scores so many goals? And fond memories of a school in New York celebrating its centenary -- but what is it exactly that makes this school such a well-loved place? Producer - Tony Grant

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  • FOOC June 12 2014: Guitar or Sitar?

    Thu, 12 Jun 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Correspondents with stories to tell: how is traditional Indian culture faring with the country engulfed in a tide of globalisation? World football's governing body FIFA is in crisis as the World Cup kicks off in Brazil. Germany and Britain are at odds over how Europe should be governed. What's in a name? It's of great importance when you're bidding to be the next president of Afghanistan. And how new technology can help those visiting the First World War battlefields of France and Belgium.

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  • FOOC June 7 2014: Mort Pour La France

    Sat, 7 Jun 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The news -- with added insight, colour and perspective. In this edition, the unsung French civilian heroes who gave up their lives in World War Two. The people in eastern Ukraine who fear the consequences of being caught up in a power struggle between east and west. Why Libyans are wary of the former general who's pledged to rid the country of Islamist militias. There's an historical battle re-enactment in Don Quixote territory in Spain. It's a bit like rugby, a bit like boxing. But why haven't the Russians been invited? And another question: why have the North Koreans opened a chain of restaurants across Asia? Our man tries to find out whether they're just proud of their cuisine, or if they have more sinister motives?

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  • FOOC June 05 2014: the Education Minister's Watch

    Thu, 5 Jun 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Looking behind the headlines: the new patriotic conservative mood in Russia -why it's making the country's beleaguered opposition feel under siege; the Thai military which has seized control of the country promises increased prosperity but warns protestors must keep quiet; the Nigerian authorities try to improve educational facilities in the north as the insurgency by Boko Haram gathers pace; education's under discussion in Mexico too - the president's decreed there must be improvements and the politicians in the United States who're not tightening up the firearms laws, they're GIVING guns away!

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  • FOOC 31 May 2014: The News in 2039

    Sat, 31 May 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Global despatches: will the African elephant be extinct in two decades? And which of the stories preoccupying correspondents today will still be seen as important in the future? In this edition, reporters in Kenya, Egypt, Kashmir, Niger and China.

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  • FOOC Thurs May 29 2014: Spinning Myths

    Thu, 29 May 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Insight, colour, analysis and description. In this edition the stories come from Odessa, Rio de Janeiro, Naples, San Francisco and Saintes-Maries-De-La-Mer.

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  • FOOC 24 May 2014: Less Freedom, More Stability

    Sat, 24 May 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents telling us more: how there's always been someone lying awake in Egypt waiting for the policeman's midnight knock; on mounting anger in Nigeria that the authorities aren't doing enough to counter the threat posed by the militants of Boko Haram; why the fishing communities of the far west of Ireland feel it's not just distance which separates them from the bureaucrats in Brussels and Strasbourg; why, in Brazil as the World Cup approaches, so many feel disillusioned, disrespected and discriminated against and our reporter's in Texas, flipping pancakes with the oldest Congressman in the House of Representatives. At 91, the veteran politician says, he's certainly not too old to continue serving the public. Tony Grant is the programme's producer.

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  • FOOC 22 May 2014: Walk Warily in Waziristan

    Thu, 22 May 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents worldwide: Owen Bennett-Jones attends a Christian church service in Waziristan, Pakistan's Taliban country; Mark Tully considers whether India's secular tradition is under threat now the Hindu nationalist BJP has been voted in to power; Justin Rowlatt watches the Brazilian authorities trying to protect 'the most endangered tribe on the planet'; Thomas Fessy visits a ski shop on the edge of the Sahara Desert in Niger and on 'Good Neighbours Day' in France, Joanna Robertson finds suspicion, hostility, grievance and gossip alive and well in the apartment blocks of Paris. Programme produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC May 17 2014: The Tourists Have Gone

    Sat, 17 May 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Stories from reporters around the world. In this edition: empty hotels and a deserted holiday coastline in Kenya as tourists head home after a Foreign Office terrorism warning; five years after the defeat of the Tamil Tiger rebels, the Sri Lankan government says the country's on the path to ethnic reconciliation - but is it? The coming European elections: will they reflect a growing wave of scepticism about the effectiveness of pan-continental government? A disaster in central America three hundred years ago which brought to an end the last independent kingdom of Scotland. It's a city even Parisians want to move to! how Nantes has been transformed from a grimy old port into a dynamic, artistic powerhouse. The producer - Tony Grant.

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  • May 10 2014: Beauty and horror in South Sudan

    Sat, 10 May 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Beauty and brutality coexist after a battle in South Sudan: a bullet whistles over the head of our correspondent in eastern Ukraine: watching the maple syrup wars in Canada: out on the town in Colombia, despite the threat from FARC rebels: and a memento in Bosnia of Gavrilo Princip, the assassin who sparked World War I. Presented by Kate Adie.

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  • FOOC May 3 2014: Heroes of Baghdad

    Sat, 3 May 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Global viewpoints. In this edition: Kevin Connolly visits the Baghdad book market and salutes the bravery of those who carry on with their daily lives amid a constant threat of violence; Jeremy Bowen considers the impact on the Middle East of the apparent coming together of the two rival Palestinian factions; Chris Terrill's on a perilous day out with the fishermen of Mauritania in west Africa; Katy Watson is in the Brazilian city of Sao Paulo where housing's a serious problem - this is a place with the world's largest slum population. And fish and rice they are used to, but Robin Lustig was in the Burma's Irrawaddy Delta when the locals, for the first time, were invited to sample German sausages and tomato ketchup.

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  • FOOC 26 April 2014: Dilemmas in Damascus

    Sat, 26 Apr 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Despatches: Syrians, exhausted by a seemingly unending conflict, face agonising decisions over their future, as Lyse Doucet has been finding out. Misha Glenny's in Rio as violent protests continue less than two months before the Brazilian city hosts the World Cup. The far-right Front Nationale could emerge from next month's European elections as the best-supported party in France -- Emma Jane Kirby encounters Euroscepticism, verging on Europhobia, in the south of the country. Matthew Teller's in Qatar: its economy's growing at nearly twenty per cent a year but its people are finding it hard to cope with a rapid pace of change. And Simon Worrall in the United States hears a love song as he witnesses the annual migration of Hispanic workers to Long Island.

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  • FOOC April 19, 2014: End of Era

    Sat, 19 Apr 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Global insight and colour. In this programme: Russians or locals? Gabriel Gatehouse goes to meet some of those still occupying government buildings in the east of Ukraine. Lives and jobs start to disappear in South Africa as a bitter mining dispute continues amid a mood of deepening disenchantment, a despatch from Hamilton Wende; On one of Rome's holiest weekends of the year, Alan Johnston's been to a non-Roman Catholic corner of the eternal city which enchanted the poets Keats and Shelley; Carrie Gracie starts her new job as the BBC's China editor with a list of hard-to-answer questions while Owen Bennett-Jones is down on the banks of the River Ganges wondering how a journalist can sort facts from fiction. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC April 12 2014: A Happy Ending

    Sat, 12 Apr 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The stories behind the stories. In this edition: why Germany's ambivalence towards Russia may emerge as east meets west to discuss Ukraine next week; West Bengal plans to restore the lost glory of Kolkata - the idea is, we hear, to make it a bit more like London; life gets harder in the Gaza Strip as the interim government in neighbouring Egypt cranks up the pressure on Hamas; 'Isn't that you know who?' A chance meeting, in a Budapest hospital, with the man who is arguably Europe's most controversial leader. And what happened when our man in Marrakech asked the king to step in to save an ancient tradition from oblivion.

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  • FOOC 05 April 2014: Underneath the Mango Tree

    Sat, 5 Apr 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Despatches from foreign correspondents. Today: Tim Whewell on what's caused the savage breakdown in law and order in the Central African Republic. As Afghans go to the polls, Lynne O'Donnell reflects on the daily threats they face from the Taliban. Ritula Shah in Gujarat on how there's cake for SOME Indians as their mammoth election approaches. Will Grant meets migrants in Mexico preparing for a dangerous and illegal desert trek into the United States and it's a literary mystery that's baffled the brilliant for more than a century - Simon Worrall's been to study the controversial Voynich Manuscript.

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  • FOOC March 29 2014: Are the Russians coming?

    Sat, 29 Mar 14

    Duration:
    25 mins

    Correspondents' stories. In this edition, Humphrey Hawksley's in a part of Europe where an increase in Russian influence would not be unwelcome. Twenty-five years after the fall of Communism, Monica Whitlock is in Romania where they are still unlocking secrets from the past. As election time approaches in India, Kieran Cooke's visiting Assam and finding remnants of a bygone, colonial era. And not far from high-tech Silicon Valley, Andrew Whitehead finds there's still enthusiasm for the old-style, printed book.

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  • FOOC 22nd March 2014: Hirsute History + Desert Verse

    Sat, 22 Mar 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kate Adie introduces correspondents' stories from around the world. Today, Jamie Coomarasamy meets the man who once was Crimea's one and only President and dreams of a new landscape; James Menendez goes to the city where month-long demonstrations started in Venezuela; Shahida Bari find camels, dogs, four by fours, twitter and verse in the deserts of the UAE; Rajan Datar is in Goa, trying his best to help pick up the rubbish; and Stephen Mulvey's memories of Ukrainian independence don't match President Putin's.

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  • FOOC 20th March 2014: Forensics and Scrummaging

    Thu, 20 Mar 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents' stories from around the world, introduced by Kate Adie. Today: Will Grant meets El Salvador's only forensic archaeologist, with the unenviable task of unearthing and identifying murder victims; Emma Jane Kirby is in a French border town, discovering why the Front National is gaining support; Karen Allen visits the former Taleban capital of Kandahar where businessmen are in desperate need of more power; Alex Preston, in Sri Lanka, finds out why rugby is becoming so popular; and Susannah Knights is with the musicians and performers of Tunisia who are poor but flourishing in their new found freedom.

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  • FOOC 15th March 2014: History, Aliens and Chicken Wings

    Sat, 15 Mar 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Kate Adie introduces correspondents' stories. This week Mark Lowen is reminded of his days in the Balkans as he talks about history to people in Crimea; three years after the start of the uprising in Syria, Lina Sinjab catches up with those who once had so much hope; Sue Lloyd Roberts hears how a religious sect that believes in Aliens and the pursuit of pleasure is trying to help victims of female genital mutilation in Burkina Faso; In Serbia, Guy de Launey tells us how a political double-act could be replaced by Superman; and Tara Isabella Burton explains why chickens should avoid the Wing Bowl in Philadelphia.

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  • FOOC 13th March 2014: Troubles in Paradise

    Thu, 13 Mar 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kate Adie introduces Correspondents' stories from around the world. Today Ukrainian journalist Andriy Kulykov wonders why silence is the order of the day with the armed men of Crimea. Peter Day is in industrious South Korea where they are trying to make the place more relaxed. Damien McGuinness visits a mega-brothel in Germany, where prostitution has been legal for over a decade, but he questions if much has really changed. We take a remarkly tourist-free ride down the Nile with Robin Denselow; it's good for him but not so good for Egypt. And Charlotte Ashton discovers why Singapore is at the bottom of the happy pile.

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  • FOOC March 08 2014: Courthouses and Codpieces

    Sat, 8 Mar 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kate Adie introduces correspondents' stories from around the world. This week, with American and British combat troops soon to leave, the author and historian William Dalrymple gives his assessment of where the latest military intervention into Afghanistan fits into the country's troubled history. Quentin Sommerville attends the court hearing of some Al-Jazeera journalists in Egypt and finds the prosecution less than convincing. Linda Pressly is in Uruguay to see if legalising marijuana will help tackle the problem of hard drugs. In India, Ed Butler spends time with sleuths of a special kind - the wedding detectives. And Stephen Smith re-visits Italy's Renaissance with its ruffs, doublets and, of course, cod-pieces.

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  • FOOC 06 March 2014: spaceships in the desert

    Thu, 6 Mar 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Stories from correspondents around the world, introduced by Kate Adie. In this programme Mark Urban hears an Iraqi policeman let rip about his own government and there are predictions of mayhem. In Afghanistan Chris Terrill visits a school that's daring to teach boys and girls together. Niger has joined the club of oil producers and Celeste Hicks describes how the arrival of a spaceship of sorts in the desert is affecting people's lives - but they need to read the small print. James Rodgers visits a World War 1 cemetery near Jerusalem and ponders how events there 100 years ago influenced the region and still do. And Justin Marozzi has been given a nickname - in Somalia. It's not flattering but it's better than the last one.

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  • FOOC March 01 2014: Revolutions are Unpredictable

    Sat, 1 Mar 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    'When change happens, it can happen very, very fast,' Steve Rosenberg in Ukraine. Revolutions: no-one can be quite sure how they'll turn out, Kevin Connolly in Egypt. Bush fires in Australia: Jim Carey on what can be learned from the Aborigines, who spent tens of thousands of years controlling the land. The modern world is closing in on the Amish communities of the US, but Beth McLeod says they're not dying out. They are, in fact, thriving. And a conflict zone is not a place where the mentally ill thrive, as Mary Harper's been learning at a hospital in the Somali capital, Mogadishu.

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  • FOOC 27 Feb 2014: Here for Eternity?

    Thu, 27 Feb 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Correspondents with tales to tell. In this edition: Gabriel Gatehouse watching the unfolding revolution in Ukraine; Abigail Fielding-Smith in the Lebanese capital Beirut as the war in Syria creeps ever closer; Will Grant on the latest chapter in the extraordinary story of drugs baron Joaquin 'Shorty' Guzman; Rachel McCormack gets a taste of the heated argument in Spain over the possibility of Catalan independence and 12 hours across the Karakum desert: Jonathan Fryer has time on the train to consider the ripples of revolution and who, if anyone, might be here for eternity.

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  • FOOC Feb 22 2014: The Hyenas Come to Town

    Sat, 22 Feb 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    London may be infested by urban foxes and Delhi beseiged by urban monkeys but Addis Ababa, as Martin Fletcher's been seeing for himself, is plagued by urban hyenas -- and they're ugly-looking creatures! David Stern's been living in Kiev, Ukraine, for five years -- and has had to get used to living with a revolution on his doorstep. A quarter of a million people, some estimate, have been detained in Syria by either the authorities or the rebels; Lyse Doucet's been talking to two men who know a lot about detainees. The long-serving leader of Zimbabwe, Robert Mugabe, is ninety years old and Kim Chakanetsa has been finding out what people there think of their president, who's been in power nearly 34-years. And Neal Razzell's been making a programme with two reporters, one from China, the other from Japan. The programme's about the strained relationship between those two countries. But how did the reporting team get on?

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  • FOOC Feb 20 2014: Saddam Hussein Lives!

    Thu, 20 Feb 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Stories from foreign correspondents. In this edition: Prashant Rao meets an Iraqi called Saddam Hussein and hears how difficult it is being named after the brutal and hated dictator; Lynne O'Donnell visits the famous 'laneways' of Melbourne in Australia and wonders whether this precious example of architectural heritage is being properly looked after by the local council; Jane Beresford finds her preconceptions shattered when she visits the Beirut suburb associated with the Hezbollah movement; Tamasin Ford journeys to a remote corner of Madagascar where an illegal trade in a rare wood is worth billions and Alan Johnston in Rome considers the man most likely to be Italy's next prime minister and suggests his strength may actually lie in his inexperience.

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  • FOOC Feb 15 2014: Marauding Baboons

    Sat, 15 Feb 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    'No wonder everyone is looting now. The elites here have been doing it for years,' our correspondent Andrew Harding is told in the troubled Central African Republic.' As Brazil awaits further demonstrations against a proposed ten per cent hike in public transport costs, Wyre Davies takes a cameraman to hospital who was fatally injured in clashes between protestors and police. Gabriel Gatehouse in the Kenyan port city of Mombasa talks about atheism and jazz with a man who warns him that an army of Allah will rise up out of the desert. Mariko Oi, herself a reporter from Japan, talks about the difficulties of making a programme about the often troubled relations between her country and China. And Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa, may be best known these days for its American military base, but Frank Gardner gets away from that and learns a little more about life, and the baboons, in the country's tranquil Rift Valley.

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  • FOOC Feb 13 2014: Come to Sunny Gaza!

    Thu, 13 Feb 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Why is Bosnia seeing its most serious unrest since the country was at war in the 1990s? How difficult is it getting America back to work? Is there public support in Nigeria for the authorities' new law against homosexuals? What evidence is there of the links between Soviet East Germany and the exotic spice island of Zanzibar? And why might our man visiting the Gaza Strip be considering going back there, with his family, for a holiday? They are all questions addressed in this latest edition of From Our Own Correspondent.

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  • FOOC Feb 08 2014: The Robots Come Out at Night

    Sat, 8 Feb 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Robots are doing the cleaning up in an old people's home in Denmark. Are they popular? Jake Wallis Simons has been finding out. A journalist in Sri Lanka is stabbed to death in her home. Charles Haviland says colleagues are now talking of a society brutalised by years of violence, where the value of life has been eroded. What do Judaism and Confucianism have in common? Quite a lot apparently, as Michael Goldfarb's been discovering in the Chinese city of Jinan. American schoolchildren are now being taught what to do should a gunman start shooting in their school. Laura Trevelyan in New York's been talking to children and to parents about it. And as a corruption scandal swirls around the Spanish royal family, Tom Burridge goes to two royal palaces to try to learn how the Spanish royals can win back their popularity.

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  • FOOC Feb 06 2014: Tiny Boats at Sea

    Thu, 6 Feb 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Spain crawls painfully out of recession but Pascale Harter, in Barcelona, says so much damage has already been done to Spanish families; in America, six million manufacturing jobs have gone but there are still some things Made in the USA, as Mike Wendling's been discovering in New York State; one territory full of natural resources is Inner Mongolia, which is part of China. But, as Martin Patience has been learning, there are concerns that development's coming at a heavy cost to tradition and heritage; Edward Lewis climbs aboard the train to Luxor to ask passengers what they make of Egypt's military leader Abdul Fattah al-Sisi and Simon Atkinson, in the deserts of Abu Dhabi, learns what exactly it is that makes a camel beautiful.

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  • FOOC 01 Jan 2014: Don't Call it a Drone!

    Sat, 1 Feb 14

    Duration:
    27 mins

    Reporters worldwide. In this edition: Britain and France are to co-operate on a new unmanned combat aircraft but all involved agree - let's not call it a drone! The first round of the Syrian peace talks have come to an end in Geneva. You might think little's been achieved, but that's not necessarily the case. We go to meet the former warlord with links to Osama bin Laden who wants to be the next president of Afghanistan and to Work Street in Athens where, despite some upbeat government forecasts, the workers reckon there are more hard times ahead. And in Delhi, arguably the world's noisiest city, we visit the car horn bazaar to find the loudest hooter of them all.

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  • FOOC 30 Jan 2014: A Doomed Romance

    Thu, 30 Jan 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    A love affair going nowhere in Damascus -- it's what happens when a rebel footsoldier falls in love with the daughter of one of the Syrian regime's security chiefs; one correspondent comes face to face with what she describes as 'the most exquisite banquet in Chinese history' while another is with the protestors in the Ukrainian capital Kiev saying the city 'looks and feels like some surreal parallel universe where an idealised, heroic past has collided with a menacing dystopian future.' We hear that Kazakhstan is suffering an identity crisis: while some now chase post-perestroika wealth, others are looking to the past and seeking guidance from the cults of their ancestors. And their songs have been labelled 'vulgar and slanderous' but we find out that the Calypsonians of Guyana claim their government's trying to silence them.

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  • FOOC 25th Jan 2014: Guns and Showers

    Sat, 25 Jan 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Reporters' despatches from around the world, introduced by Kate Adie. Today, Will Grant on the astonishing prevalence of guns in Central America: Josh Spero in Jerusalem asks how best to teach Israeli children about the Holocaust without traumatising them: Jake Wallis Simons witnesses friendship across the Muslim-Christian divide in Sierra Leone: Lina Sinjab returns to her home city of Damascus, where the once-vibrant cafe society is fast fading away: and in Toulouse, Chris Bockman discovers that the municipal bathhouse has become a virtual community centre. Producer: John Murphy

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  • 23 Jan 2014 Battlegrounds

    Thu, 23 Jan 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    As athletes turn up to the winter Olympic games, what might they find? The Thai fishing industry is accused of using slave labour; Syrians can only look across the border from Turkey at their old homes and hope to return one day; an Italian priest takes on militia groups in the Central African Republic to save Muslims and Christians alike; and we hear of one of Britain's worst military defeats which is still a source of great pride for Zulus. Kate Adie introduces these reports from around the world.

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  • FOOC 18 Jan 2014: Kerouac's Back

    Sat, 18 Jan 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Story telling: Kerouac the runaway dog returns from his adventures in Mali and the police present their bill; our camera crew in Cairo set out to film a poster which the military authorities strongly disapprove of; violence against women is on the rise in Afghanistan as the withdrawal of western troops gathers pace; there's despondency in the world's newest nation, South Sudan, as foreign troops join the fighting there and, in a sauna deep in the Ural Mountains, our correspondent meets two hunters and asks questions about bribery, corruption and gay sex.

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  • FOOC 11 Jan 2014: A City of Intrigue

    Sat, 11 Jan 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    A secret city, melted cheese, female freedom fighters, buried treasure, an emperor's magnificent lifestyle, songs by the camp fire, Kalashnikovs and puppies, Kazakh carpenters and Tajik tilers

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  • FOOC 04 Jan 2014: Somalis on Ice

    Sat, 4 Jan 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Foreign correspondents: James Copnall meets the men now controlling the opposing forces in the battle for South Sudan; Nick Meo hears the concerns surrounding the huge project designed to cover over the radiation threat from the old Chernobyl plant in Ukraine; Humphrey Hawksley examines the working conditions of the brick makers helping to construct India's economic miracle; Matthew Teller relives a historic flight along the River Nile -- it may have taken three months to complete, but those responsible were hailed as heroes and Mary Harper meets the skaters from Somalia taking to the ice and hoping to make their mark at an international tournament in Siberia.

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  • FOOC 28 Dec 2013: Transglobal Express

    Sat, 28 Dec 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Over the past year, BBC correspondents have reported on upheaval in Egypt, war in Syria, a government shutdown in America, a new pope and a royal baby. But this special edition of From Our Own Correspondent avoids the major headlines and the big breaking stories in favour of a ground-level view of the last 12 months. So, in this programme: Rajan Datar takes a ride with a polyphonic choir in Georgia and Reggie Nadelson hears the story of Harlem's Apollo Theatre. Nick Thorpe finds strangely tender moments in a Romanian slaughterhouse while Steve Rosenberg plays piano with the man who ended the Cold War. We journey to the deserts of Sahara and South America, take trains in Portugal and Nigeria and hear reporters grapple with strange musical instruments in Vietnam and Switzerland. And there's more in this montage of some of the year's more entertaining dispatches, presented by Kate Adie. Producer: Mike Wendling

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  • FOOC 21 Dec 2013: Good to See You Again!

    Sat, 21 Dec 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Good to see you again! Mark Doyle is reunited with his spectacles, which were lost on a battlefield, and gets to see some of the lesser reported glories of Somalia. The Greek central bank forecasts an end to six years of recession and Mark Lowen, in Athens, talks of the resilience of the Greek people and their love of life. Reasons to be cheerful in the eastern German city of Leipzig too: Chris Bowlby's there talking to locals about a huge transport project ready after lengthy delays; Susie Emmett sees signs of energy, ingenuity, integrity and community in Kenyan farming but is less impressed by the colour of her bath water and James Fletcher is grounded by an Arctic storm while out news gathering in Greenland. Can he make it home in time for Christmas? From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC Dec 14 2013: Turmoil in Thailand

    Sat, 14 Dec 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents with stories from around the world: in this edition, Jonathan Head on how an argument over democracy lies at the heart of the current political turmoil in Thailand; Lucy Williamson's in the Chinese city closest to North Korea where a brutal leadership purge was underway; Katy Watson meets a man in the United States who a thousand women a year turn to for help after having breast cancer surgery; James Harkin on the Syrian air force officer who's been imprisoned on three separate occasions and Joanna Robertson in Paris explodes the myth that French women don't get fat and hears the claim that in French society, a fat female is a failure. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC Dec 7, 2013: Mandela: five correspondents' stories

    Sat, 7 Dec 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Nelson Mandela: five correspondents who'll never forget how their own stories came to coincide with that of the great South African leader, who died on Thursday. Fergal Keane was our man in Johannesburg as Mr Mandela fought to keep his country back from the brink of civil war; John Simpson on the day he met a man who had 'become perhaps the most revered person on earth.' Milton Nkosi recalls the risks taken to keep the name of Nelson Mandela alive in the townships during his long years of imprisonment; Hamilton Wende on what it was like, as a white South African, growing up in a country where even talking of Mr Mandela could be dangerous and James Robbins on the long-awaited day when the man who went on to lead the country was freed from prison and appeared before a jubilant crowd in Cape Town. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC 30 Nov 2013: East or West?

    Sat, 30 Nov 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Correspondents with stories from the news. Today, Steve Rosenberg on how Ukraine's caught in a tug-of-war between Russia and the European Union; a huge refugee camp by the Sahara Desert is hit by drought - Chris Terrill says it's difficult for the inmates and the aid agencies trying to help them. But it's a boon for the Islamic militant groups looking for recruits; freak weather has killed thirty thousand cattle in the American state, South Dakota - Sybil Ruscoe's been there to see how the ranchers are coping; James Menendez has been travelling in Burma, also known as Myanmar. The place is fast modernising, but transformation has yet to arrive on its railways. And Robin Lustig goes hiking through Peru's Andean foothills looking for coca growers and finding out why they're dubious about their government's anti-drugs initiative. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC 23 Nov 2013: Heroes of Baghdad

    Sat, 23 Nov 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Reporters' despatches: already this year more than seven thousand people have been killed in the upsurge of violence in Iraq. Andrew Hosken explores a country full of widows, orphans and frightened people mourning the loss of loved ones. In America, two significant anniversaries - Allan Little has been to the locations involved, Gettysburg and Dallas, and uncovers surprising revelations about the state of the USA today. The president of Bulgaria's talking of 'emergency' as demonstrations against the government show no sign of letting up - Emma Jane Kirby's been talking to the protestors in the capital, Sofia. Peter Day visits a Chinese village where they haven't yet turned their backs on the 'Great Helmsman' Mao tse Tung. And as the big Thanksgiving Day American football matches approach, Mike Wendling reflects on a sport facing difficult questions about the safety of its players. The producer of From Our Own Correspondent is Tony Grant

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  • FOOC 16 Nov 2013: The Noise of the Typhoon

    Sat, 16 Nov 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The noise and devastation of Hurricane Haiyan: Andrew Harding on the first town in the Philippines to feel the force of the storm; Charles Haviland on how the furore surrounding the Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting in Sri Lanka has pushed the Tamil north of the country into the news spotlight; Nicholas Wade travels to Jerusalem to hear people's views about the latest attempts to reach a Middle East peace settlement; Moldova and other former Soviet satellites are due to sign a trade deal with the EU and Tessa Dunlop's been finding out that not everyone there feels it's a good idea to turn their backs on Russia and Will Ross has been taking time off from the hard news of Nigeria to take a look at its thriving arts scene -- and a novel use for the xylophone! From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant

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  • FOOC 14 Nov 2013: The Lost Orchards

    Thu, 14 Nov 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents' despatches: Jeremy Bowen on the talks, restarting in Geneva next week, about Iran's nuclear ambitions; the Colombian authorities are trying to rehabilitate child soldiers who have fought for leftist armed groups like the FARC - Tom Esslemont's been along to take a look; Steve Vickers finds out why people no longer want to live among the thousands of islands off the coast of Sweden; an atheist goes to church: Andrew Whitehead visits Martin Luther King's Baptist church in Alabama and finds himself caught up in a service. And is there any trace left of the apple orchards which once covered the island of Jersey? The answer to that one comes from Christine Finn. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant

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  • FOOC Nov 09, 2013: Fraying at the Edges

    Sat, 9 Nov 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents worldwide: Kevin Connolly talks of unfinished business in the Middle East finally being attended to after one hundred years. Historical and continuing allegations of rape and torture in Sri Lanka are investigated by Frances Harrison. For India, its mission to Mars is an opportunity to come out top of a new Asian space race -- Justin Rowlatt examines the question: couldn't the cash instead have been used to lift many Indians out of poverty? Kieran Cooke boards a train in the west of Ireland to see if passengers feel optimistic now their prime minister has decreed the country's well on the way to seeing off an economic crisis. And David Mazower on stories of remembrance and loss which emerge in the wake of that extraordinary discovery of a huge cache of looted artwork in Germany. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC 07 Nov 2013: The Midnight Bus to Damascus

    Thu, 7 Nov 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Reporters worldwide: while refugees continue to stream out of Syria in their thousands, there are people who need to go INTO the country. Nigel Wilson's been talking to a group of them at the bus station in the Jordanian capital, Amman. Lyse Doucet, meanwhile, is in the Syrian capital Damascus where life for some, but not others, is becoming increasingly hard. Thomas Fessy talks of the shock in Francophone Africa at the killing of two French radio journalists in Mali. In Malaysia, elephants are losing their habitat as development continues apace. Bob Walker takes a look at a controversial plan to give the animals a new home. And Indian women over the centuries have been wearing the elegant sari -- Anu Anand has been hearing of a campaign to boost its popularity in the face of competition from more contemporary, if less stylish, clothing. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC Nov 2 2013: Cities on Edge

    Sat, 2 Nov 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Correspondents' stories: Jeremy Bowen on the effect in Egypt of the upcoming trials of senior figures from the Muslim Brotherhood; you could write the history of the South Pacific as a succession of arrivals of powerful, foreign vessels in palm-fringed lagoons, according to John Pickford in Tonga; the Sudanese capital Khartoum 'changed forever' after the recent riots in the capital - that's what James Copnall's been hearing in Khartoum; Linda Pressly's been to the Spanish city of Melilla, on the north coast of Morocco, to meet the so-called 'mule women' and find out why they're prepared to shoulder such heavy loads and Russians have never been famous for their smiles, but Jamie Coomarasamy's wondering if times have changed and they're now no longer trying to keep a straight face! The programme is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC 31 Oct 2013: A Night Out in Greenland

    Thu, 31 Oct 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents' stories: once the cradle of the Arab Spring, Tunisia's now battling an Islamist insurgency and an huge influx of refugees from neighbouring Libya - Andrew Hosken has been investigating; Andreas Gebauer finds parallels between Israel's security barrier and the Berlin wall which he first saw as a young boy; Emilie Filou is in the Comoros Islands in the Indian Ocean meeting people desperate to start a new life in nearby French territory; Vincent Dowd's visiting a corner of south west Ireland he describes as paradise and Rob Crossan creates a stir among drinkers at the only pub in a remote town in Greenland. The programme's producer is Tony Grant

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  • FOOC 26 Oct 2013:The Ruin of Rome

    Sat, 26 Oct 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The financial crash has devastated the historic centre of Rome - Joanna Robertson talks of a favourite city now drained of community life; the perils of newsgathering in Sri Lanka: Fergal Keane meets journalists there determined to carry on reporting despite the risk of intimidation, assault and even murder. Jon Donnison's in the Blue Mountains of New South Wales where the wildfires are still raging and there's a heated debate about how much climate change is to blame; Steve Evans, on the row surrounding the bugging of Chancellor Merkel's 'phone, wonders what information the Americans have gleaned. And a travelling correspondent may carry a lap-top, a digital recorder, a camera but a two-month-old baby? Madeleine Morris has the story of what happened when a toddler came too.

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  • FOOC Oct 24 2013: Don't Mention the War!

    Thu, 24 Oct 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    As one of the last heroes of the Vietnam War is laid to rest, Rajan Datar hears young people there keen to move on from those years of conflict, to celebrate instead a land rich in culture and economic opportunity; Jonah Fisher talks of the debate in swiftly-changing Myanmar about what exactly makes a detainee a political prisoner; as Greece continues its punishing austerity programme, Alexa Dvorson has been finding out how they are coping out in the countryside, away from the main cities; 'let there be light' seems to be the message in Lagos: Neal Razzell has been to see a state government initiative in Nigeria's biggest city introduce street lighting to many formerly-dark and threatening streets and the BBC's bureau in Moscow has been celebrating fifty years of existence. Steve Rosenberg has been looking at news reporting there then and now. The producer is Tony Grant

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  • FOOC 19 Oct 2013: The Migrants Who Made it

    Sat, 19 Oct 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The Via Roma in the Italian island of Lampedusa -- Alan Johnston says that for the migrants who make it in from the sea, this is the road which may take them to better lives in a richer world. Owen Bennett Jones studies the contrast between the lives of the women who present programmes on Pakistani TV with those who live in distant villages. There's a heated debate in France about what they should do about their seriously overcrowded prisons. Christian Fraser's been to one of the country's biggest jails. Lynne O'Donnell in Afghanistan finds out what can be learned in a visit to some of the world's oldest, most magnificent and archaeologically significant sites. And it's been a tense and anxious few days for some in the Senegalese capital, Dakar and all, Thomas Fessy tells us, because of the price of sheep. The producer is Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC 17 Oct 2013: Songs of Love and Loss

    Thu, 17 Oct 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The traditional sad songs of Portugal have become sadder still as the government in Lisbon announces another tough, cost-cutting budget -- Andrew Hosken has been noting the reaction in Lisbon. The Indian authorities launch an inquiry into a stampede at a temple which killed more than a hundred people -- Andrew North says only days before they were being praised for the measures they'd taken as a cyclone battered the country's east coast. There's an election next week in Madagascar -- Emilie Filou wonders if it might bring improvements to the island's beleaguered education system. On St Kitts in the Caribbean, Orin Gordon finds people divided over plans to build luxury homes in some of the island's most celebrated spots. While in the Italian province of Puglia, the discussion's not so much about luxury homes as why rich foreigners are flying in to buy homes which once only the poor lived in. Tony Grant produces From Our Own Correspondent

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  • FOOC Oct 12 2013: Breaking the Rules

    Sat, 12 Oct 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents' stories: the Champs d'Elysees is an icon of Paris, a majestic piece of town planning. So why does our man in Paris Hugh Schofield suggest, rather forcefully, that visitors should avoid it? The news caravan may have moved on from Libya, but Tim Whewell's been finding out that the country's still in the midst of a revolution. Joanna Jolly has been to Uttar Pradesh in India to report on the aftermath of fighting between Hindus and Muslims. Listening to people's stories of violence and suffering, she found herself becoming involved in ways she hadn't expected; James Coomarasamy has been to Tajikistan in Central Asia where there's mounting concern about the future, when NATO troops leave neighbouring Afghanistan and Jonathan Head joins a group of well-heeled women in a luxury spa in Myanmar and hears stories of a country in the grip of dramatic change. Tony Grant is the producer of From Our Own Correspondent

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  • FOOC 10 Oct 2013: Iceland's Book Boom

    Thu, 10 Oct 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Looking behind the news. In this programme: David Loyn examines the claim that NATO has achieved nothing but suffering in Afghanistan; Louisa Loveluck on controversy surrounding the Egyptian military offensive in Sinai; there's a book boom going on in Iceland and Rosie Goldsmith has been finding out why; gun-toting gangsters on the streets of Acapulco as Mexico tries to deal with the aftermath of two deadly storms - Will Grant's on that story and what makes a war memorial memorable? Steve Evans ponders that question in Leipzig. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant

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  • FOOC 05 Oct 2013: A Giant Snake Comes to Town

    Sat, 5 Oct 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Colour and analysis from around the world: Kevin Connolly says as much as a quarter of the population of Lebanon is now Syrian - and the cost of hosting so many refugees is soaring; Mark Lowen in Athens on the reaction of Greek men and women to the authorities' campaign against members of the far-right Golden Dawn party; there's been an economic revolution in The Seychelles and Tim Ecott's been finding out how it was achieved; Kirsty Lang talks about the day a six metre long snake brought terror to the streets of a small town in Brazil while Joanna Robertson has been observing the French easing their way into autumn with the help of some particularly exotic cakes. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC Oct 03 2013: Sibelius, Saunas and Salmiakki

    Thu, 3 Oct 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents with colour and analysis from around the world: Theopi Skarlatos in Thessaloniki on the authorities' crackdown on the far right; Alex Preston is in what he calls one of Africa's most expensive and charmless capitals, Abuja in Nigeria; distant La Reunion, in the Indian Ocean, is a popular destination for well off French tourists -- Robin Denselow's been learning that's causing resentment among some local people; Tessa Dunlop discovers how a photographer's work is teaching residents in the Romanian capital, Bucharest, what happened to their city centre during the days of the Communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. And among correspondents there are many tales about daunting dishes -- here, Mark Bosworth in Finland talks of a national favourite: licorice shot through with ammonium chloride. The programme is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC 28 Sept 2013: The President's Golden Scissors

    Sat, 28 Sep 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Correspondents' stories: behind the scenes at the UN General Assembly in New York - Nick Bryant says it's been about so much more than the keynote speeches in the assembly hall. Andrew Harding was covering the seige in Nairobi in which more than 60-people were killed. Many of the city's residents, he says, feel personally scarred by the horrors of what happened at the Westgate Centre. Havana Marking talks of her bid to track down the Pink Panthers, the gang thought responsible for a string of daring jewel heists in the south of France this summer. There's a visit to Dushanbe in Tajikistan: Jamie Coomarasamy takes a look at the president's spectacular building programme while Nick Thorpe is in Austria where hydropower is a major issue and the hills are alive with the sound of disagreement.

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  • FOOC 26 Sept 2013: The Love Hunters

    Thu, 26 Sep 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Global despatches. Today: it was Gabriel Gatehouse's local shopping mall but now the Westgate Centre in Nairobi has become known as a place of fear, suffering and death; did Angela Merkel do TOO well in the German election? Chris Morris on why forming a new government there could be a protracted business. As the Egyptian authorities move to ban the Muslim Brotherhood, Quentin Sommerville talks of the country's increasing polarisation. China's wealthy elite have found their own solution to the country's girl shortage - Lucy Ash has been meeting 'The Love Hunters' in Shanghai. And John Pickford has been finding out if there are still beachcombers to be found in the faraway islands of the South Pacific. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant

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  • FOOC 21 Sept 2013: The Dry Bones of a Thousand Empires

    Sat, 21 Sep 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents' despatches: Jeremy Bowen in Damascus reflects on the lessons a reporter learns after more than twenty years covering conflicts around the world; Steve Evans meets a lady down on her luck in a Baltic port city as Germany prepares for new elections; Diana Darke looks at Turkey's huge 'GAP' water project and wonders if it will work for or against the country's Kurdish population; near Toulouse in France they've found a crashed German wartime aircraft in a cave -- and some locals, it seems, weren't all that keen on digging up its history and can Emma Thomas really get to grips with the Danish language without looking at textbooks or going to classes? All will be revealed. Tony Grant produces From Our Own Correspondent

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  • FOOC 14 Sept 2013: Unanswered Questions

    Sat, 14 Sep 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kate Adie introduces reports from correspondents around the world. Following the death sentences handed down to four men in India for the rape and killing of a young woman, Rupa Jha reflects on her own personal experience of some disturbing events from her childhood. Linda Pressly is with the gold miners of Kalimantan in Indonesia and sees the high price they have to pay as they try to earn a living. Mary Harper is in Somaliland, where books have a more powerful draw than guns. Lindsay Johns reflects on the culture of the Caribbean island of Martinique and what it means to be French by accident. And Emma Jane Kirby is with the former Casanovas of Italy who are still hoping for a return to better days.

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  • 7 Sept 2013: A Shattered Mosaic

    Sat, 7 Sep 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kate Adie presents correspondents' stories from Syria, the US, Australia, South Africa and Italy. Lyse Doucet hears how Syria's mosaic of cultures is being shattered; Humphrey Hawksley visits the big brains of America's Ivy League who have been thinking about how to put a country back together again; James Fletcher rides the Australian economic engine, and listens to the roar of Harley Davidsons; Mark Lowen discovers the anti-apartheid pedigree of his grandfather; while Tom Carver is in Italy, celebrating his father's escape from a POW camp in 1943 and the brave family who helped him.

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  • FOOC 31 Aug 2013: A Banquet of Unpalatable Choices

    Sat, 31 Aug 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents tell their stories: Mark Mardell in Washington on difficult decisions for President Obama: Charles Haviland, off for dinner with the departing president of Pakistan, ponders over the milk pudding on the legacy Asif Ali Zardari leaves behind; a different perspective on the state of Chinese justice comes from John Sudworth, who was covering the trial in Jinan of ousted politician Bo Xilai; as immigration tops the election headlines in Australia, Jon Donnison tells the story of a refugee who made it from the civil war in Syria to the offices of a women's magazine in Sydney and Nick Thorpe's unearthed the reason why, somewhere in the dry Hungarian soil, the heart of Suleiman the Magnificent is beating a little faster. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC 24 Aug 2013: You Can't Kill an Idea

    Sat, 24 Aug 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents' despatches: the wealthy principality of Liechtenstein is forced to face up to the idea of belt-tightening, Alex Marshall; Alastair Newton Brown strolls through the streets of the Iranian capital, Tehran where he finds people keen to engage with the West; Rajini Vaidyanathan in Washington considers the implications of the jail sentence handed down to secrets leaker Bradley Manning; Justin Rowlatt may have struggled to appreciate traditional Vietnamese music but more and more Vietnamese, he says, are keen to learn it. And Kevin Connolly is in Cairo where he's been hearing members of the Muslim Brotherhood explain why they believe they're a force that's not about to go away. Producer: Tony Grant

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  • FOOC 17 Aug 2013: Seventy-Two Snipers

    Sat, 17 Aug 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Correspondents' stories. Today: Hugh Sykes is in Cairo where the mood, at the end of a troubled week, is bleak and the outlook, apparently bleaker. Syrians caught in the cross hairs - Hannah Lucinda Smith on the real story of Aleppo's war: one of people trying to carry on with their lives amidst a conflict they never chose; Petroc Trelawny is on a bridge in Hanoi. The Vietnamese city, once the capital of French Indochina, is growing fast and economic forecasts are optimistic. Celeste Hicks suffers a head injury in Chad. It gives her a chance to see whether any of the country's extensive oil wealth has trickled down as far as the local hospital emergency room and David Stern has been in Minsk, the capital of Belarus, where he walked in the footsteps of the man accused of killing President John F Kennedy and ended up facing something of a quandary. The producer of From Our Own Correspondent is Tony Grant

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  • FOOC 10 Aug 2013: Prepared to Die

    Sat, 10 Aug 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Will the Egyptian army move in to break up the camp in Cairo set up by supporters of the ousted president, Mohamed Morsi? Caroline Wyatt has been meeting residents of a city which is bitterly divided. Christians are leaving Syria in their thousands. Diana Darke's been learning that they're being greeted with enthusiasm in neighbouring Turkey. Jonathan Head says there's been a conciliatory mood in Burma as people gathered this week to mark the anniversary of an uprising which launched the country's pro-democracy movement. There are some in Gibraltar who feel the British government's not doing enough for them - Tom Burridge is on the Rock as the latest chapter in a 300-year-old row unfolds and the BBC's new man in Australia, Jon Donnison, explains why he's finding it hard coming to terms with the sheer size of his new patch. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant

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  • FOOC Aug 03 2013: the Himalayan Tsunami

    Sat, 3 Aug 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Indians living in the shadow of the Himalayas are being told they could face further life-threatening weather events -- Jane Dyson tells the story of a man and a mule who were unable to contend with the power of nature. Jake Wallis Simons drinks beer with an Israeli settler who tells him that whatever the outcome of the current John Kerry peace initiative, he and others like him still believe in their rights to the land. Shaimaa Khalil is in Libya, meeting the founder of a well-known militia group and asking him about al-Qaeda and about the Libyans who've gone to join the fighting in Syria. There's much talk in Latin America about legalising marijuana and liberalising other drug laws - Will Grant in Mexico takes a look at who might make money from the change. And Frederick Dove travels to China to find out if it's true that the Chinese are falling in love with the game of cricket.

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  • FOOC 27 July 2013: The Albanian Riviera

    Sat, 27 Jul 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Albania, not so long ago a redoubt of hardline Communism, is now hoping for EU membership. Julia Langdon's been assessing its chances during a visit to the seaside there. Emma Jane Kirby's visiting a company which makes men's pants in France. She's looking into claims that it's harder than ever for French businesses to prosper. Wyre Davies is reporting on the papal visit to Brazil - gauging the impact it's making in a country buoyed up by economic optimism but still, in many places, very poor. Prashant Rao tells us about a favourite supermarket in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad, and how its luck finally ran out when it was targeted by bombers. And John Pickford, in the kingdom of Tonga, finds Chinese aid to this archipelago in the Pacific plentiful but sometimes, a mixed blessing. Tony Grant produces From Our Own Correspondent.

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  • FOOC July 20 2013: Mrs Wong and Mrs Lim Go Shopping

    Sat, 20 Jul 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    "He knew nothing about politics." A father talks to Humphrey Hawksley about his only son, killed in a street protest in the Egyptian city of Alexandria. Will Grant in Mexico on the Central American migrants who face abuse at every turn as they try to make their way to the United States. A fishing community in Alaska is engaged in a bitter battle with the mining industry - Stephen Sackur says it's dividing opinion in this wild and sparsely populated territory. Sarah Toms on the mums and dads in Singapore going to school so they can help their children with the homework. And Lyndsay Johns crams into a minibus taxi in South Africa and finds out about the highs and lows of a morning commute in Cape Town. The producer of From Our Own Correspondent is Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC July 18 2013: A Million Smartphones

    Thu, 18 Jul 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The Bulgarian establishment under threat from a million smartphones - Nick Thorpe on the protestors demanding their government steps down. Ahead of election day in Cambodia, Annie Caulfield goes to the circus and finds happy children and painful memories. Peter Day is in Zambia where diarrhoea is a major killer of children - medication works, but getting it to remote villages presents a huge challenge. John Pickford's in the Cook Islands, in the South Pacific, and tells us why the arrival there of two large canoes caused great excitement. And Simon Wilson has discovered that baseball's not just a metaphor for life in the US, it's also a way of preparing Americans - for failure! FOOC is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • Return to Rangoon

    Sat, 13 Jul 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Quentin Sommerville talks to protestors on Cairo's streets; Andrew Harding returns to Burma and this time he doesn't need a disguise! Linda Pressly visits a unique community of sex offenders in Florida, Leo Johnson is blasting for gold in Ecuador and David Chazan learns how to be a cyber-hacker in Lille.

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  • 11 July 2013: Saints and Sinners

    Fri, 12 Jul 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The recent feuding within Nelson Mandela's family has reminded us that within the anti-apartheid hero's myth is a man and a family with very human frailties, as Gabriel Gatehouse ponders when he visits a play in Johannesburg. Yolande Knell pays a visit to the deported cleric Abu Qatada's new home - Jordan's al-Muwaqar Prison. Jo Fidgen joins the crew of a Norwegian whale hunting boat. Ed Stocker finds out why some poorer Bolivians can't afford to eat their staple food, quinoa, any more. And Dany Mitzman on the Calabrian mafia's most recent and high profile victim.

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  • FOOC 06 July 2013: You Can't Hug on Facebook

    Sat, 6 Jul 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Portuguese people are leaving the country in their thousands, travelling to the country's former colonies in search of work - Emma Jane Kirby's in Porto and Lisbon learning how recession's driving many away from their family and loved ones. The exodus from conflict-ridden Syria continues too - Kieran Cooke meets a family from Damascus now selling shoes in the Armenian capital, Yerevan. Kevin Connolly's in Cairo and asks how the military will react at the next election if the people once again select an Islamist candidate to be the country's leader. Beth McLeod has been finding out that a high proportion of Vietnam's sucessful businesses are run by women - she suggests the country's turbulent history may point at some of the reasons why. And far out in the Pacific, John Pickford's on Christmas Island where he stumbles across a reminder that this was the place where Britain carried out some of its first nuclear weapons testing.

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  • FOOC 04 July 2013: A House in Damascus

    Thu, 4 Jul 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    What's happened to her house in the Old City in Damascus? Diana Darke hears how it's fared during the ongoing conflict in Syria. David Shukman is in Prescott, Arizona, a community devastated after 19 firefighters lost their lives battling a forest fire. Kinshasa in DR Congo is Africa's fastest-growing city - Jonny Hogg's been finding out how law and order's fast collapsing there too. Natasha Breed, who lives in Kenya and regularly films lions there, is shocked at the conditions a lion's forced to endure at a circus in France. And, on a lighter note, Rajan Datar, high in the Caucusus mountains of Georgia, is invited to try his hand, or rather his larynx, at the ancient art of polyphonic singing.

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  • FOOC 29 June 2013 A Thousand Horses Come to Town:

    Sat, 29 Jun 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    A thousand horses. Three thousand sheep. And people, thousands of them too, clustered like locusts around the Old Port in Marseille. What on earth were they all doing there? Anna Magnusson was finding out. European leaders have announced they'll try to tackle unemployment; Emma Jane Kirby's in southern Spain where the under-25s are finding it hardest to get jobs. Qatar has a new ruler, or emir; Frank Gardner's just back from this ultra-rich Gulf state wondering: is this the world's most ironic country? Rupert Wingfield Hayes has been to the Indonesian island of Sumatra to look into South East Asia's worst smog crisis in years. And among the correspondents in Senegal, reporting on the excitement, the rumours and the disruption which accompany a visiting American president, was Caspar Leighton. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC 27 June 2013: The Story That Never Happened

    Thu, 27 Jun 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    It's the great reconciliation story which never happened -- Andrew Hosken in Libya on a homecoming which didn't take place. Nigel Wilson tells us of the dangers involved in trying to provide a taste of home to Syrians stuck in Jordan. Marie Keyworth on the Portuguese struggling to get by as the long recession continues. In Croatia, Mick Webb finds many enthusiastic about joining the EU - the country's set to become a full member next month. And who's for some red-braised wallaby tail with native fruits? Not many Australians apparently. Fuchsia Dunlop says there's a reluctance to tuck in to some of the local wildlife. Tony Grant produces From Our Own Correspondent.

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  • FOOC 22 June 2013: A Seat With a View

    Sat, 22 Jun 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Air travel may be not quite the glamorous, magical experience it once was but our frequent flier Peter Day, sitting bolt upright in economy class, says there can still be something magnificent about it. For Shaiima Khalil, it's a long hot overnight train journey to Upper Egypt to find out how the revolution's playing out far from the big cities of the north. Chris Morris, covering the anti-government demonstrations in Turkey, hears the prime minister Mr Erdogan promise better days ahead. Fergal Keane tells of past and future colliding on a beach near the southern tip of Africa. And Stephen Smith, deep in a vault in London, gets his hands on some of the glittering riches of the Russian Tsars. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC 20 June 2013: Discontent on the Nile

    Thu, 20 Jun 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    'Everything is worse after the revolution' - tourism workers along the River Nile in Egypt tell Matthew Teller about the turmoil in their industry. Tessa Dunlop returns to Romania to see if the lot of orphans there has improved in the last twenty years. How some refugees from the fighting in Syria are finding a warm welcome in Hizbollah communities in northern Lebanon - Sakhr Al-Makhadhi explains. Alastair Leithead meets the Yurock tribe in northern California -- an ancient people in modern America. And why Andy Martin found the huge police presence at the G8 gathering of world leaders in Ireland distinctly disarming.

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  • FOOC 15 June 2013: A Demo a Day

    Sat, 15 Jun 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    A passion for protest: street demonstrations, rarely permitted in the days of President Mubarak, have become common in Cairo and Egypt's other cities; Aleem Maqbool sets out to see if he can find a demo a day. Phil Goodwin on how war has changed Syria from a hospitable, friendly place into one that's brutal, paranoid and vicious. A meeting critical to the future of Detroit - Jonny Dymond on a great American city poised on the edge of bankruptcy. Peter Meanwell meets cross-dressing musicians in Equatorial Guinea and tucks in to crocodile in chocolate sauce. And a snake guarding a pot of gold? Jane Dyson says it's one of the less alarming ghosts believed to reside in the forests of the Himalayas.

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  • FOOC 13 June 2013: God Bless Hungary!

    Thu, 13 Jun 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Hungarians fight the floods! This collection of despatches from radio correspondents includes Nick Thorpe in Budapest on how people buried their differences and worked together to save their capital from an overflowing River Danube. Bethany Bell says they're picking cherries in the Golan Heights as the Syrian war rages on in the valley below. Croatia is about to join the EU - but Andy Hosken finds that the campaign to eradicate old ethnic animosities has only achieved limited success. Yolande Knell is in Gaza from where, in recent times, rockets have been fired at Israel. She discovers how Gazans are coping with the sanctions imposed on them by the Israelis. And who is responsible for climate change in the Himalayas? Kieran Cooke, who was there, is told the answer - by a Hindu holy man!

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  • FOOC 08 June 2013: Mussolini's Gay Island

    Sat, 8 Jun 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents' despatches from around the globe. Who'll emerge victorious from the struggle in Taksim Square? Paul Mason gives his view after spending the week in Istanbul. Lyse Doucet believes the new prime minister of Pakistan faces a daunting set of problems -- but she finds there's little chance of him going hungry! The Nigerian military say they're making progress in their campaign against the rebels of Boko Haram - Will Ross has been to the north-east of the country to make his own assessment. Alan Johnston explains how Mussolini's Fascists created a corner of Italy where homosexuals could be glad to be gay. And foreign journalists are rarely welcomed in North Korea but Juliet Rix has been there as a tourist and was delighted to meet the locals and go dancing in a park in Pyongyang. Tony Grant produces From Our Own Correspondent

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  • FOOC 06 Jun 2013: Is Mr Erdogan Listening?

    Thu, 6 Jun 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Is the Turkish prime minister Mr Erdogan listening to the demonstrators? James Reynolds has been following the protests in Istanbul and other cities. Chris Morris is in historic Mostar learning how difficult it is for Bosnians to forget about the past. People in the Golan Heights have been telling Wyre Davies they are concerned the fighting over the border in Syria is about to spill over into their territory. Lucy Ash has been to Yaroslavl in Russia to examine whether the first woman in space, Valentina Tereshkova, really was the proletarian heroine she's made out to be. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC 01 June 2013: The World's Troubles - Put on Hold!

    Sat, 1 Jun 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    A world that's not just full of doom and gloom: Anna Borzello on the remarkable changes that have happened in northern Uganda since the area was abandoned by the brutal rebels of the Lords Resistance Army; Richard Porter tells us how the cruelties of Saddam Hussein have become a distant memory in the marshlands of southern Iraq -- people have returned to their homes, the wildlife is back too; BBC foreign correspondent James Reynolds talks of the phone call to London which might have cost him his job; Elisabeth Kendall explains how tribesmen of eastern Yemen are finally getting a say in their own future and Hugh Schofield, a British dad in Paris, sees his daughter transformed by philosophy lessons.

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  • FOOC 30 May 2013: A Croc at the Door!

    Thu, 30 May 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Hungry crocodiles are invading homes in northern Australia looking for the family pet, Phil Mercer has that story; the dangers of a drive through increasingly violent Iraq, Paul Martin; what makes an Indian cinema crowd scream at the screen, Mark Tully; the former gangsters trying to reduce gun crime on the streets of LA, Frank Gardner and the controversy surrounding a new TV show in Denmark which features men in suits talking about naked women, Emma Jane Kirby.

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  • FOOC 25 May 2013: The German Sense of Humour

    Sat, 25 May 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Reporters around the world with the news behind the headlines: Aleem Maqbool talks of the 14-hundred-year old conflict which lies behind today's breakdown in law and order in Iraq; the bicentenary of the controversial composer Wagner causes Steve Evans to question preconceptions about Germans and their society; Ed Butler meets a billionaire in Azerbaijan and chuckles over his plans for a huge building project; the African Union's optimistic about the continent's future but Gabriel Gatehouse finds good news in short supply in the Democratic Republic of Congo. And French schoolchildren will soon lose their traditional midweek day off school. Joanna Robertson tells us they're not happy about it!

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  • FOOC 23 May 2013: A Good Operator

    Thu, 23 May 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Correspondents around the world: Jeremy Bowen on the increasing difficulties of reporting the war in Syria; Paul Lewis explores how corruption is reaching into the heart of everyday life in India; the diaspora returns - Andrew Harding talks of Somalia at the crossroads; Louisa Loveluck's at the morgue in Cairo - some say it's been covering up cases of police brutality and in Rome, Alan Johnston has been walking the cobblestones beloved of the tourists but held in rather less affection by the locals.

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  • FOOC 18 May 2013: Conspiracy!

    Sat, 18 May 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Correspondents' stories from around the world: a field day for conspiracy theorists as the White House stumbles in a fog of political scandal; Libya's second city Benghazi's unstable, violent and there's uncertainty there over the presence and degree of influence of radical Islamists; as France slips back into recession, there's a trip to Lot-et-Garonne in the south west where they have their own ideas about how to cope in times of economic difficulty; to the holiday islands of The Seychelles to find out why there are Somali pirates there practising their football skills. And it's noisy, dirty, the poverty's shocking, the traffic awful. So why is it so hard to say goodbye to Mumbai?

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  • FOOC 11 May 2013: Brides For Sale

    Sat, 11 May 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Correspondents around the world with the detail behind the headlines: Beth McLeod on the struggling Syrian refugees resorting to selling their daughters into marriage. The costs and consequences of standing in a Pakistani election are explored by Owen Bennett Jones. Another food scandal in China: Martin Patience on how, this time, it's rat which is leaving a nasty taste in the mouth. How can a pile of nappies in the British Museum spell good news for Somalia? The answer comes from Mary Harper while Tim Hartley takes time out at a football match in North Korea. It might still be the beautiful game but not as most of us know it! The producer of From Our Own Correspondent is Tony Grant

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  • FOOC 04 May 13: The Chocolate Revolution

    Sat, 4 May 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Reporters' stories from around the world: why Rupert Wingfield Hayes believes North Korea's recent sabre-rattling speaks not of a regime that is strong and confident but one that is weak and scared, of the outside world and increasingly of its own people too. Emilie Filou accompanies the fly-catchers of Burkina Faso as they test an old legend - 'if you live too close to the river, it will eat your eyes!' Mexico's latest political scandal unfolds in a restaurant over the road from the BBC office - Will Grant's handily placed then to reveal all. 'A kind of hell' - Darius Bazargan finds out why heroin addiction's spreading through Afghani society and James Harkin's been on Turkey's border with Syria and tells a tale of the actress who couldn't stop crying and the boy who's made friends with a turtle.

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  • FOOC 27 April 13: Nigeria's Lady Gaga

    Thu, 2 May 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Reporters from around the world tell their stories. Steve Rosenberg visits Dagestan on the trail of the alleged Boston bombers, and finds that violence is part of everyday life there. Nick Thorpe watches an attempt to educate Hungarian police cadets away from prejudice against the Roma minority. It's a tough sell. The military's continuing grip on Egyptian society is explained by Shaimaa Khalil, who hails from an army family herself. In the Sioux country of South Dakota, Matt Wells investigates the contested legacy of the site of the battle of Wounded Knee. And Will Ross in Nigeria's Bayelsa State sees the glamorous movie stars at an endless awards ceremony, and also the militants getting rich off illicit oil money. Producer: Lucy Ash

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  • FOOC 20 April 13: The Libyan Truffle

    Sat, 20 Apr 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Correspondents' stories: why President Assad may now believe he's winning the argument; the garage man in Jordan recruiting young Islamists to go fight in Syria; why shackles are still being used to restrain some of the mentally ill in Indonesia -- even though officially they are banned; a truffle recipe's handed over at an army camp in Syria and exciting days in the northernmost reaches of Scandinavia as the annual reindeer migration approaches. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC 13 Apr 13: The Stradivarius Tree

    Sat, 13 Apr 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Colour and insight from reporters around the world: the man who'll find you a violin tree in the Jura Mountains; what's going to happen to the man who tends the roses in the Afghan town of Lashkar Gah? Culture clash in Bamako -- how some of the refugees from Mali's north are overstaying their welcome. Why the Mexican president's warning about vigilantes may not be heeded in the mountainous south-west and ominous signs as birds of prey gather in the Kenyan capital, Nairobi.

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  • FOOC 06 April 13: It Could Have Been Much Worse

    Sat, 6 Apr 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    How the direction of the wind saved Tokyo from possible radioactive contamination -- Rupert Wingfield Hayes examines the debate over re-starting Japan's nuclear power plants. Andrew Harding considers how Nelson Mandela's hospitalisation has caused South Africans to look again at their country's development in the years since apartheid. The police are said to deal drugs, the playgrounds are littered with syringes -- but Lucy Ash says not all optimism's been extinguished in Ukraine. David Chazan in France on a man who stole from a bank and has become something of a folk hero. And Nick Thorpe goes to Slovenia and Bulgaria to find out what's irking the middle classes and why in the open-air markets, the strawberries are not selling. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant

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  • FOOC 30 Mar 13: The Jihadi Vegetable Patch

    Wed, 3 Apr 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents' despatches from around the world. In this edition: Thomas Fessy marches through Mali with the French Foreign Legion looking for insurgents; Jonathan Fryer's in the Angolan capital, Luanda, where people have much to look at but, in most cases, little money to spend. What's the point of the Swiss army? Imogen Foulkes says some there believe there's no further need for compulsory military service. Alan Johnston chronicles a sad, final day at a 'trotting' track in Italy which is closing down, another victim of the recession there. And the Germans may have a reputation for businesslike efficiency but Steve Evans in Berlin has been learning that they don't always get it right!

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  • FOOC 23 Mar 2013: Talking About Fish

    Sat, 23 Mar 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Insight, colour and analysis from reporters around the world. Mark Lowen's in Cyprus where the banks remain closed and the people have been getting angrier. Shahzeb Jillani makes the decision to work as a correspondent in the troubled Pakistani city of Karachi - his family questions his judgement! Charlotte Pritchard takes a drive through the smuggler borderlands between Colombia and Venezuela. As politicians and community leaders in Yemen discuss the future, Daniel Owen's been to one town where the talk is mainly about fish. Justin Rowlatt's investigating the mining boom bringing riches to Mongolia - he meets one man he describes as Mongolia's most influential since Genghis Khan! Producer: Tony Grant

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  • FOOC 21 Mar 2013: The Black Cowboy

    Thu, 21 Mar 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    How did Herb Jeffries become a black cowboy film star when he wasn't even black? Sarfraz Manzoor travels to Kansas in search of the answer. Mike Wooldridge is in Pakistan - an election date's been announced but will the new team of rulers tackle what some call an alarming rise in religious intolerance? Western Sahara is not much reported upon: Celeste Hicks goes there and tells a tale of secret police, comic book spies and wobbling octopus. Anthony Denselow travels to Uttar Pradesh in India to find out why so many widows make their way to the city of Vrindavan. And the Chinese have developed a thirst for fine wine. Jim Carey has been discovering that Australia's winemakers want a slice of this potentially huge new market. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant

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  • FOOC 16 Mar 2013: Referendum Day

    Sat, 16 Mar 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Millions of Zimbabweans vote on a new constitution - Andrew Harding, in Harare, quotes one government minister saying the document is the 'midwife' to a brand new future for the country. Jonathan Head talks of Burma's most famous resident, the Nobel prizewinner Aung San Suu Kyi. Once revered as an icon, now she's having to get used to being heckled as she goes about her work as a politician. Louisa Loveluck talks of the crumbling Egyptian railway system and how it is starting to tarnish the reputation of the new government led by Mohammed Morsi. More than a billion Indians are about to get brand new state of the art identity cards. Peter Day says it's a bold move by the government -- but will it be a successful one? People in Jerusalem are awaiting the imminent arrival of Barack Obama. Kevin Connolly speculates on what may emerge from the trip and wonders if, afterwards, streets will be named in honour of the American president! The programme is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC 14 Mar 2013: Decision Time for the Aborigines

    Thu, 14 Mar 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    What price can you put on memory? Neil Trevithick is with the Aborigines whose territory in Western Australia's being coveted for its mineral wealth. Once hundreds of hermits lived in the mountains of northern Lebanon. Today John Laurenson's meeting one of just three who remain. Joanna Jolly's in Nepal where, six years after the end of civil war, no-one's been brought to court to face charges of war crimes. Will Grant is with the Venezuelans paying their last respects to their late 'commandante' in Caracas. And oil should soon run again through the pipelines from South Sudan. Richard Nield says if the revenue it brings provides a more reliable supply of electricity, its people will be delighted.

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  • FOOC 09 Mar 13: Battle Stations at the Vatican!

    Sat, 9 Mar 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Allan Little says there are deep disagreements among the cardinals as they prepare to elect a new pope. They are voting too in the Falklands. Caroline Wyatt says the result is in little doubt. But what will they make of it in Argentina? Stephen Sackur has been in Tunisia, a land which has been in deep political crisis since the shooting last month of a prominent critic of the government. How should a town handle the legacy of being the birthplace of a notorious dictator? Bethany Bell's been asking that question in Georgia and in Austria - and getting a variety of answers. And Steve Rosenberg went to interview a former leader of the Soviet Union. Little did he know he'd end up accompanying him on the piano!

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  • FOOC 07 MAR 13: The Boy Who Knocked Stalin Down

    Thu, 7 Mar 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents' stories. Today: Steve Rosenberg's in Moscow as Russians debate the legacy of Josef Stalin sixty years after his death. There's speculation that Turkey could be poised to sign a peace deal to end the long conflict with Turkish rebels - James Reynolds has been investigating. Steve Vickers tells us why the Swedish authorities want to move their northernmost city to a new location two miles away. Owen Bennett Jones reflects on how much the instability and violence in today's Pakistan has shaped a new generation of successful novelists and Judith Kampfner's returned to Singapore, where she was born and brought up, and found it readier than ever to embrace its multi-ethnic history. She also enjoyed its wobbly cakes! From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC 02 Feb 13: Teatime in Germany

    Sat, 2 Mar 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Reporters worldwide tell their stories. Steve Evans in Berlin on how, perhaps surprisingly given their history, Germans feel a real affinity for Britain. She used to be called 'the most powerful woman in Mexico.' Will Grant on the arrest, on embezzlement charges, of one of the country's top union leaders. Paul Henley tries to keep his cool listening to a stream of homophobic vitriol in Russia. Young people in Portugal queuing up to leave the country - Alison Roberts is in Lisbon where morale's plummeting as the jobless figures soar. And as the tenth anniversary of the US-led invasion of Iraq approaches, Kevin Connolly's there musing on how one never quite knows how history will work out. The producer is Tony Grant

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  • FOOC 28 Feb 13: Cold in Calcutta

    Thu, 28 Feb 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Reporters worldwide: Rahul Tandon is in Calcutta as its people struggle to cope with an unaccustomed spell of cold weather. 'Together Bulgarians are Strong' - Nick Thorpe tells us that's the cry of protestors whose disenchantment's brought down the government. The Kenyan election's on Monday and Gabriel Gatehouse has been finding out that land remains an issue of vital importance to many. A difficult decision for parents in Guatemala - Humphrey Hawksley explains why many would prefer their children NOT to go to school and Jennifer Chevalier in Ottowa on why Canadians are nervous about Europe making trade advances to the US. From Our Own Correspondent is produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC 23 Feb 13: The Lap of Luxury

    Sat, 23 Feb 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    When Madeleine Morris returned to her native Australia after twelve years in the UK she knew she'd find things different there, but she didn't realise her wallet would take such a battering! Ian Pannell, in northern Syria, finds a group of little boys sheltering in a Roman-era tomb and asking where their mother's got to. Craig Jeffrey's at the Indian college where once students demonstrated for the right to cheat in exams. Sicily looks like being one of the key battlegrounds in the Italian election -Chris Morris is there communing with the dead ahead of the big vote. And as France prepared to take on England in the Six Nations tournament at Twickenham, Chris Bockman finds the congregation deep in prayer at a church they call 'Our Lady of Rugby.'

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  • FOOC 21 Feb 13: Desperate for Tourists

    Thu, 21 Feb 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Despatches from around the world: Jonathan Head on a little-reported but long-running conflict in southern Thailand; a rare protest on the streets of Singapore - Karishma Vaswani tells of mounting anger in Asia's richest nation; a new government in Italy, after this weekend's election, seems unlikely to tinker much with the employment laws - Ed Butler believes nepotism in the labour market is set to continue; Paul Lewis talks to Ugandans finding it hard to get by even if official forecasts are upbeat about the country's economic future. And getting around wasn't much of a problem for King Tut -- but Terry Egan finds the going tough in Egypt's Valley of the Kings.

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  • FOOC 16 Feb 13: Wild Horse Chase

    Sat, 16 Feb 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Reporters' despatches from far and wide: a vegetarian of 37 years' standing, Nick Thorpe, is despatched to ask questions about horse meat and to investigate a slaughter house in Romania. Can Japan spend its way out of recession and into prosperity? Economists are thrilled at the idea. But Rupert Wingfield Hayes in Tokyo has his doubts. What's the US military doing in a remote corner of the Philippines? Kate McGeown's gone to find out. Will Ross is in northern Nigeria wondering why so few of those detained, and suspected of militant attacks, are appearing in front of the courts. And Tim Butcher in New York meets up with an old friend with whom he once went to war.

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  • FOOC 14 Feb 13: Was It Worth It?

    Thu, 14 Feb 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Reporters worldwide - today: Ruth Sherlock on how the Free Syrian Army's losing support as people turn to the Islamists for help in getting by during difficult times. Wyre Davies on a plot still unfolding: he's in a bookshop in Tunis looking out on an unfinished revolution. Mark Mardell on how experience in the US military is helping to shape the new team around President Obama. Tom Esslemont on murder in Corsica -- old scores are being settled against a Mediterranean backdrop. And it's like a scene out of 'Spooks' as our Christian Fraser's taken, furtively, into the heart of one of Europe's biggest infrastructure projects. The producer is Tony Grant

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  • FOOC 09 Feb 13: Low-Speed Rail

    Sat, 9 Feb 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Stories from around the world. Today: Will Grant in Mexico on the night horror descended on a beach holiday on the shores of the Pacific Ocean. Why were 21-thousand knives handed out on the streets of Mumbai? Alex Preston was there and has the answer. Chris Morris finds out what the building with the biggest carpet in Europe can tell us about attitudes to the EU. Richard Hamilton senses a swagger of self-confidence on the streets of Nairobi but, he says, the ghosts of an older Kenya are never far away. And high-speed rail it isn't, but Will Ross finds it far from dull on the noon train to Kano in northern Nigeria.

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  • 07 Feb 13: Digging Up The Beer

    Thu, 7 Feb 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Analysis, colour, wit and observation from journalists worldwide. Today: Pascale Harter chronicles the fury in Spain at reports that politicians are lining their pockets while the people are making painful sacrifices in the name of austerity. James Harkin on the death of a young engineer who wanted to help build a new Syria after the revolution. Jill McGivering on the Indian women being talked into hysterectomies by doctors eager to make more money. Orla Guerin meets an Afghan governor who says don't worry about the Taliban, peace is at hand - although he does keep an assault rifle close at hand! And Thomas Fessy, in newly-liberated Timbuktu, unearths the beer that had to be buried when the fabled city was seized by Islamist rebels. Produced by Tony Grant.

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  • FOOC 02 Feb 13: Settling Scores

    Sat, 2 Feb 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Tim Whewell, just back from Mali, talks of retribution. Every conflict throws up winners and losers. And it's the nomadic Touareg, he tells us, who have become targets for revenge. Arguments over gun control have once again been dominating the headlines in the US and Paul Adams has been reporting on a debate he says is quintessentially American. Darius Bazargan has been in northern Lebanon, where he has been talking to factions allied to different warring groups in Syria. The Swiss train service has an enviable reputation, but Imogen Foulkes has been finding out it has managed to anger its customers. And in South Africa, Hamilton Wende has been out with a group of township teenagers whose extravagance and flamboyance is angering some of their elders.

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  • FOOC 31 Jan 13: 'Dream Big Kid!'

    Thu, 31 Jan 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents take a closer look at events in their part of the world. Aleem Maqbool follows a week of street protests with the question - can democracy really take root in Egypt? The arts world is in turmoil in Hungary, and Nick Thorpe tells us how the government there is being accused of hijacking the cultural agenda to promote its own political ends. Parto Parvin, and that's not her real name, talks of the difficulties being faced by exiled Iranian journalists trying to cover events in their homeland. Daniel Sanford hears an extraordinary tale of survival from the Battle of Stalingrad, which was drawing to a close exactly seventy years ago. And Reggie Nadelson tours the New York theatre which has staged concerts by just about everybody in African-American musical entertainment.

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  • FOOC 26 Jan 2013: The Art of Seduction:

    Sat, 26 Jan 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kevin Connolly in Jerusalem says keep that election bunting close at hand - Israelis may have to vote again before long. Will Self goes to the Romanian capital, Bucharest: millions live there but he's of the opinion that it would be hard to find a less homely place. The Chinese authorities say they're tackling the Great Smog of Beijing, but Martin Patience doesn't expect great change any time soon. A tale of violence, bribery and corruption from Brazil's Amazon frontier is told by Sue Branford. And in Paris, John Laurenson examines the shocking claim that French men no longer understand romance.

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  • FOOC 24 Jan 2013: Return of the Bunga Bunga King

    Thu, 24 Jan 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Andrew Harding travels to the centre of Mali to find out how the fight against the Islamist rebels is affecting life in one small country town. Thousands of prisoners are being released from jail in Georgia -- Damien McGuinness has been learning that not all Georgians think that's such a good idea. Silvio Berlusconi's trying again to be prime minister of Italy. Alan Johnston in Rome's been finding out that many Italians don't want to see a return of the bunga bunga king. Orla Guerin tells us what it's like to live and work in Pakistan, a land which sometimes seems as if it's in perpetual crisis and ... turbulence at 35-thousand feet!!! Paul Moss takes a flight where the hostesses dispensed diplomacy along with the gin and tonics.

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  • FOOC 19 Jan 13: New Enemies, New Friends

    Sat, 19 Jan 13

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Correspondents around the world telling their stories: Lyse Doucet has been meeting some of the millions of people who've been forced to flee their homes in Syria because of the continuing bloodshed there. Mark Doyle in Bamako on how the fighting in Mali has seen a new alliance being forged between the French and the Nigerian military. The Hungarian economy may be tottering - but Petroc Trelawny has been finding out it's boom time in the flea markets and second-hand shops of Budapest. Why are the French drinking so much less wine than they used to? John Laurenson set off for a country bistro in search of answers. And as the fighting continues in Mali, Nick Thorpe remembers a visit there and a drive across the Sahara Desert in more peaceable times - thirty two years ago.

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  • 17 Jan 2013: Return of the Gendarme of Africa

    Thu, 17 Jan 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents' news and views from around the globe: Hugh Schofield is in Paris as French troops take on Islamist rebels in the former French colony of Mali; Will Grant on how Venezuelans are starting to consider a future without their president, Hugo Chavez; Emily Buchanan on the Indian holy man who wowed the ladies in New England; Jo Fidgen on how the Sami people of northern Sweden haven't quite forgotten their traditionally nomadic ways and James Luckhurst takes shelter from the cold and finds a welcome in one of the most unusual museums in the Baltic states.

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  • Title: Stateless in Kuwait

    Sat, 12 Jan 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kate Adie presents reporters' despatches from across the globe. Matthew Teller meets the stateless bidoons of Kuwait Mark Lobel looks attempts to improve one of Cape Town's poorest settlement in the wake of a devastating fire. Jonathan Fryer assesses Baghdad's surprising aspiration to become the conference capital of the Middle East. Alan Johnston wonders whether the mystery of Garbaldi's final resting place will ever be solved. Dany Mitzman describes the trials and tribulations of not eating meat while living in pork-crazed Bologna.

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  • FOOC 5 Jan 2013: The secrets of eternal youth

    Sat, 5 Jan 13

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Andrew North reflects on whether the recent rape and murder of a woman in Delhi might bring a greater soul searching amongst all sections of Indian society. Owen Bennett-Jones teeters on the "fiscal cliff" with anti-tax activist Grover Norquist, asking if he's really the most powerful man in America? Nicholas Shakespeare makes a nostalgic return to Phnom Penh. Andrew Bomford uncovers the secrets of eternal youth on the Greek island of Ikaria. Hugh Schofield banishes the January blues by exploring P.G. Wodehouse's love affair with France. And in the process, identifies what may be the master's finest opening paragraph.

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  • FOOC 29 Dec 12: Highlights of 2012

    Sat, 29 Dec 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    As the year draws to an end, Kate Adie presents a feast of highlights from correspondents' despatches across 2012. Fucshia Dunlop is in Shanghai, dancing the the city's glamourous past. Lucy Ash is challenged by a call of nature in Russia's Siberian wilderness. Kate McGowan decides against boiled duck foetus for breakfast in Manila. Allan Little uncovers the great egg crisis in the Falkland Islands. Emma Jane Kirby is feeling distinctly under dressed as she takes a table in St Tropez. And Will Grant discovers that Mexico's 'Day of the Dead' is a suprizingly uplifting experience.

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  • A Parisian merry-go-round

    Sat, 22 Dec 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kate Adie presents despatches from reporters across the globe. Lucy Ash travels to Burma where she finds that Chinese investment ventures are being challenged by local people. As Greece receives it latest tranche of bailout funds, Mark Lowen looks back over a tumultuous year in the country. Andrew North looks at the controversy surrounding the proposed introduction of foreign supermarkets to India. Joanna Robertson joins in the Parisan love affair with fairgrounds. Horatio Clare explains why change might be coming to the remote island of St. Helena in the very near future

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  • FOOC 15 DEC 12: Dementia Village

    Sat, 15 Dec 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Reporters worldwide provide context to the week's news. Today: South Africa's ANC at the crossroads? As the party prepares for conference, its figurehead Nelson Mandela in fragile health, Andrew Harding reads the political runes at a critical time for the country. Allan Little is in the Polish city of Wroclaw observing how old allegiances and old identities are emerging in the new Europe. Now what's the attraction of the 'mitten' or 'hairy' crab? At this time of year in eastern China they're much in demand and Fuchsia Dunlop's been finding out why. Not many of our correspondents have got to meet the president of Equatorial Guinea, Teodoro Obiang. Stephen Sackur has though and asked him questions the president thought impertinent and malicious. And is getting dementia really the end of the world? The Dutch authorities have created a village for dementia sufferers which is pioneering a new sort of care.

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  • FOOC 08 Dec 12: A Nightmarish Tale

    Sat, 8 Dec 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The BBC's Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen examines claims that a conclusion to the long conflict in Syria is within sight. After a year of protests against President Putin, Steve Rosenberg finds support for him is still strong -- particularly in cities away from the capital, Moscow. Bethany Bell's in South Tyrol where some are angry that the Italian authorities, in the midst of financial crisis, want this wealthy Alpine province to contribute more to the national exchequer. The Turks know that the television soap opera's an effective means of extending influence throughout the Middle East. And the BBC man Rajan Datar gets offered a screen part! And they've been harvesting the olives in the hills of Tuscany. Dany Mitzman's been lending a hand and observing that the harvest methods have changed little since ancient times.

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  • FOOC 01 Dec 12: Cairo at the Crossroads

    Sat, 1 Dec 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Jon Leyne in Cairo reflects on the debate about Egypt's future. Will it be dictatorship or democracy? Secular or religious? Ed Butler's been to Halabja, the town in the Kurdish region of Iraq which, almost 25 years ago, was attacked with chemical weapons. The tea industry in India is in trouble - Mark Tully says change is on the way to the tea plantations of Assam. Celeste Hicks returns to her old base in Mali and finds that the traditional history-singers have little to say about the Islamist takeover of Timbuktu. And Kieran Cooke is in Norway trying to work out the appeal of a particularly unfragrant culinary delicacy.

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  • FOOC 24 Nov 12: The Worst Possible News

    Sat, 24 Nov 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Despatches from reporters across the globe. Jon Donnison was in Gaza as the city came under Israeli attack and a BBC man took a distressing phone call. Gabriel Gatehouse was in Goma as rebels took the town in eastern Congo with UN peacekeepers standing by, seemingly unable to intervene. Petroc Trelawny was in a part of France which is taking a special interest in the vote in Catalonia which many feel could be a step along the road to Catalonian independence. Owen Bennett Jones has been talking to a famer in New York state who feels consultancy might be a better earner than growing onions. And cup cakes? Salsa classes? Nightclubs? Mary Harper's been seeing signs of Africa both old and new in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa.

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  • FOOC 17 Nov 12: A Frugal Dinner

    Sat, 17 Nov 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Reporters' despatches from around the world. Afghanistan: as pressure grows on the British prime minister to bring the troops back home early, defence correspondent Caroline Wyatt considers the legacy they'll leave behind. Russia: the Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk is the country's prisons capital. Alex Preston has been to meet a former convict trying to help others, recently released, to find a toehold back in Russian society. El Salvador: the murder rate in this Latin American nation has gone down significantly thanks to a truce between two notorious gangs. Linda Pressly has been talking to some of their leaders in a high security jail. France: the infamous Sangatte asylum centre may have closed but Emma Jane Kirby has been finding out that migrants continue to flow into the port city of Calais. Germany: Steve Evans gets offered relatively frugal fare at a dinner party in Berlin. But he isn't surprised.

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  • FOOC 10 Nov 12: A Poisonous Cocktail

    Sat, 10 Nov 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Burma: Jonathan Head goes to Rakhine state in Burma where bitter unrest has resulted in more than a hundred deaths and a hundred thousand displaced. Libya: Kevin Connolly visits a war graves cemetery and considers stories of loss and love, grief and anger. Japan: Rupert Wingfield-Hayes takes a boat to the islands at the centre of a bitter argument in the South China Sea. USA: As the dust settles after the election Jonny Dymond's in Indiana looking on as the real business of America gets done. and Mexico: Will Grant's in Oaxaca state where they believe in bidding farewell to the dead in a festive rather than a funereal atmosphere.

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  • Driving on Mars

    Thu, 8 Nov 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The United States of America: after the election excitement the Obama team start planning for four more years. Paul Adams. Mali: preparations well advanced for a military operation to repel Islamist rebels from the north of the country. Afua Hirsch. Oman: the Arab Spring comes calling at the Gulf state once called 'a place of wind and spiders.' Matthew Teller. Georgia: Can the new government act to restore parts of the country now effectively under Russian control? Martin Plaut. The USA: A visit to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and a realisation that driving on Mars is harder than it looks. Richard Hollingham. Producer: Tony Grant

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  • 3 Nov 2012: Terror in Northern Nigeria

    Sat, 3 Nov 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Will Ross on the bloodshed in Northern Nigeria;Theopi Skarlatos on why Golden Dawn is becoming Greece's worse nightmare;Anu Anand vents her frustrations about shambolic India - business is booming but what about power cuts and burst balloons? Also privileged Princeton - Dave Edmonds explains why so many alumnae are happy to donate billions to one of the world's richest universities. And Joanna Robertson tells us why the French Prime Minister reminds people of a small chocolate covered bear.

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  • 1 Nov 2012: No Safe Refuge

    Thu, 1 Nov 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Gabriel Gatehouse talks to a once-loyal Alawite pilot who ran foul of Syrian intelligence and was accused of planting bombs on military planes. Syrian refugees in Jordan tell Sahkr al Makhadhi how they fled the war zone but are now desperate to return. In Moscow, a new map marking the homes of Stalin's victims gives our correspondent Daniel Sandrof uncomfortable information about his own flat. Fact-checking is always tough, but Rana Jawad says it's especially tricky in Libya, where the rumour mill is stuck on overdrive. And David Willis explains why some Californians cough up for presidential campaigns - while others rage against the gridlock when Obama visits.

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  • 27 Oct 2012: In the Valley of the Dawn

    Sat, 27 Oct 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Kate Adie presents despatches from: Tim Whewell in a small town in Syria in the midst of the current conflict. Andrew North on trepidation in Afghanistan as the country prepares for NATO withdrawal and elections in 2014. Rajan Datar meets members of Brazil's Valley of the Dawn cult. Tim Dinham explains why your social life really can depend on the kind of Bewab or caretaker your apartment has in Cairo. And Jon Donnison spends a day with the best Yasser Arafat lookalike on the West Bank.

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  • 25 Oct 2012: The Party Animals

    Thu, 25 Oct 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Will Grant in Cuba: 50 years after the Missile Crisis, Fidel Castro still has the power to made headlines. Jill McGivering in Shenzhen sees the gulf between different generations in modern China. Kate McGeown looks at the hopes for peace in the Southern Philippines. Kim Philley experiences the art of animist 'spirit possession' in Burma. And Steve Evans explores the etiquette of cycling in Berlin.

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  • 20 Oct 2012: Cities United and Divided

    Mon, 22 Oct 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Dispatches from reporters across the globe, presented by Kate Adie. Chris Morris in Berlin analyses Angela Merkel's increasing international confidence. Fergal Keane hears the echoes of history amidst Syrian refugees in the Turkish city of Izmir. Niall O'Gallagher takes the temperature of Catalan nationalism on the streets of Barcelona. Craig Jeffrey asks if "jugaad" - the spirit of creative and quick fixes - is really the solution to India's challenges. And Hamilton Wende in Maputo, the booming capital of Mozambique, finds corruption on the rise.

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  • FOOC 18 OCT 12: Lederhosen Style

    Thu, 18 Oct 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Thousands of Kenyans prepare to go to court to pursue claims against the British. Gabriel Gatehouse in Nairobi explains how they date back to the Mau Mau rebellion in the 1950s and why they are getting little publicity inside Kenya itself. The Dutch are changing their famously-liberal drugs laws. Manuela Saragosa says the decision's delighted some but infuriated others. Caspar Leighton's been observing celebrations of fifty years of Ugandan independence. He says people there are wondering whether, after their nation's shaky start, they are now suffering from too much stability. Rich and poor , young and old, if you want to strike up a conversation with an Indian, start talking about gold. Rahul Tandon is in Calcutta finding out why. Lederhosen for men. Heidi-style dresses for women. Bethany Bell has been learning why these clothes, so long the preserve of the ultra-conservatives in southern Germany and Austria, have now become highly fashionable.

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  • FOOC 13 OCT 12: The Tough Cats

    Sat, 13 Oct 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Andrew Harding's in Zimbabwe where there are fears of a return to violence as the election season approaches Ian Pannell's been in the Syrian city of Aleppo where there's been fierce fighting and where foreign fighters have responded to calls from the rebels for assistance Will Grant tells us of the embarrassment suffered by the authorities in Mexico after the disappearance of the body of one of the country's most notorious drug lords Louise Redvers visits the new multi-million pound seafront development in the Angolan capital Luanda and hears suggestions that, in this poor country where many live without water and electricity, the money would have been better spent on other projects The cats in Jerusalem are tougher than the dogs in your neighbourhood! That's the view of Kevin Connolly who's trying to rub along with a feline population which believes in getting its own way.

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  • FOOC 11 Oct 12: India's Missing Children

    Thu, 11 Oct 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Anu Anand in Delhi on what happens to the two hundred thousand Indian children abducted each year; a future vision for Africa -- Gabriel Gatehouse in Kenya meets a man with a radical plan; Chloe Arnold on how Algeria is desperate to escape the clutches of a violent past; how much has the Chinese rail network changed? Angus Foster has ample time for reflection on a 16-hour journey to Wuhan and Laura Trevelyan in New York gets an American style-makeover as she prepares to become an 'anchor' on American television.

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  • FOOC 06 OCT 12: Coming Home Early?

    Sat, 6 Oct 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Quentin Sommerville in Kabul says an early and substantial drawdown of British troops in Afghanistan is being privately considered David Willey wonders who else at the Vatican - besides the butler on trial for stealing Papal documents -- is dissatisfied with the way the church is being run Frances Harrison meets survivors from the civil war in Sri Lanka as officials there hope cricket will help restore the island's image as a holiday paradise Pascale Harter in Barcelona on the Chinese finding business opportunities amidst the recession in Spain Mattia Cabitza charts Peruvians' relationships with their cats: some revere them as furry family pets, while others think they make a tasty meal.

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  • FOOC Oct 04 12: A Tale of Two Termini

    Thu, 4 Oct 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Unemployment's up, the tax bills are up, public cheerfulness is down. Hugh Schofield says these are gloomy times in France. Sunday's general election in Venezuela could be a close one. And already it's providing our correspondent Paul Moss with a wardrobe nightmare. The stalemate in London surrounding Wikileaks founder Julian Assange continues. Jo Fidgen says that in Sweden, where he's wanted after allegations of sexual assault, most people believe he should come back for questioning. Hundreds of thousands of Crimean Tatars have been returning to their homeland. Robin Banerji has been learning that many are finding it hard to track down their cultural heritage. And biggest, tallest, longest, most expensive? Modern China certainly deals in superlatives but Martin Patience wonders if size really does matter or if it's all a question of insecurity.

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  • FOOC 29 Sept 12: A War Getting Worse

    Sat, 29 Sep 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Lyse Doucet's in a Syrian suburb hearing stories about a civil war which is reaching more parts of the country every week. Damien McGuinness finds there are complaints from some Turkish women about the good times which have arrived at a resort town on Georgia's Black Sea coast. Justin Webb wonders whether ludicrous amounts of time and money are being spent trying to woo undecided voters in the US presidential election. Lucy Ash is at a monastery contemplating the growing influence on the Russian state of the Orthodox Church. And while visitors to the Philippines may have great things to say about a fascinating country, Kate McGeown says they rarely mention the food!

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  • 27 Sept 2012: The Vegas Blues

    Thu, 27 Sep 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Justin Rowlatt visits Las Vegas and learns why America's casino capital has suffered more than most from the economic crisis. Sarah Birke, reporting from the border between Syria and Turkey, meets a rebel commander who says he'd rather write poetry than go to war. Will Ross has been investigating reports that young girls have been forced to hand over their babies for adoption in Nigeria. Daniel Nasaw's has learned how the battles of the American Civil War have helped to shape the debate in the current US presidential campaign. And Gideon Long's been to the remote island in the South Pacific which inspired Daniel Defoe's castaway classic Robinson Crusoe.

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  • 22 Sept 12: A Mountain of Debt

    Sat, 22 Sep 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Damian Grammaticas in China on how accounts of forced abortions from around the country have fuelled a debate on a once-taboo subject: the state's One Child only policy. Paul Mason tells how Spain's third city Valencia is being buried under a mountain of debt. Now the chemists are running out of prescription drugs. Gabriel Gatehouse is in Kenya where questions are being asked about an outbreak of factional violence. Is it simply a matter of local feuding or should national politicians shoulder some of the blame? Steve Rozenberg's been to meet the hardline president of Chechnya and ask him questions about the Islamicisation of his Russian republic. And Georgia Paterson Dargham chronicles how Beirut is increasingly feeling the effects of the Syrian conflict. She tells us how some residents in the Lebanese capital are wondering: has the time now come to get out?

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  • 20 Sept 12 : Lots of Cakes, Not Many Eggs

    Thu, 20 Sep 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Andrew Harding says ending one miners dispute in South Africa does not mean the authorities' troubles are over. Judith Kampner, a new US citizen, volunteers to become an election worker -- and all does not go according to plan. Jonathan Fryer hears that while Istanbul may be one of the world's most cosmopolitan cities, Turkey does not officially approve of multiculturalism. Martin Buckley takes the slow train to Belgrade and finds a lively city keen to move on from recent Balkans history. Will Grant experiences an egg shortage in Mexico -- a country more reliant on eggs than any other.

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  • 15 Sept 12: Palace of Shame

    Sat, 15 Sep 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kevin Connolly suggests that two deaths in the Middle East, eight hundred years and several hundred miles apart, offer lessons on the wisdom of foreign intervention in Syria. Alan Johnston's been to a building in Rome they call the Palace of Shame where hundreds of migrants live with time on their hands to consider the difficulties of finding a dream life in Europe. Some of the millions who left Zimbabwe as the country fell into violence and poverty have started to make their way back. But Jenny Cuffe's been discovering that not all are being welcomed home with open arms. Nick Thorpe -- knocked off his bike in Budapest -- has had an unexpected opportunity to take a close look at the Hungarian health service. And the economic crisis may have hit Ireland hard. But Kieran Cooke, in Blacksod Bay, County Mayo, has been learning that people are still determined to have some fun.

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  • 13 Sept 12: The Sacred Crocodiles

    Thu, 13 Sep 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Thomas Fessy flew into The Gambia to ask questions about recent executions. But he was thrown out of the country. It's left him asking: what have the authorities got to hide? Iraqi police and army officers have been accused of taking part in a murderous campaign of persecution against the country's gay community. Natalia Antelava meets one senior official who reckons there are only about ten homosexuals in the whole country and, he tells her "they need to change." John Laurenson's in a vast shanty town on the edge of Madrid hearing stories from people who've lost everything in the economic crisis. The man who looked after the sacred crocodiles in the Ivory Coast is not doing the job any longer. John James tells us about his very last day at work. And Kathy Flower, who lives in a village in the French Pyrenees, finds that the mayor plays a significant part in French community life.

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  • FOOC 08 SEPT 12: The Fourth Banned 'T'

    Sat, 8 Sep 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Greece remains a land where millions go each year to enjoy their holidays. But Mark Lowen's discovered that it's now also a place where increasing numbers of people are finding it hard to cope with the austerity demanded of them. The Russian republic of Chechnya is enjoying the most peaceful time it's seen in years but Oliver Bulloughsays its people seem far from content. Linda Pressly's been to Israel to talk to some of the Haredi, the inclreasingly influential ultra-orthodox, who seem set to play a critical role in the country's future. Emma Jane Kirby is in St Tropez as the new French leader prepares to address his people on TV. She wonders if there might be lessons he can learn from the glitzy Cote d'Azure. Justin Rowlatt, in China, knows Tiananmen, Taiwan and Tibet are subjects the authorities might prefer him to avoid. But now he's learned there's a fourth T - toilets. The Chinese, he's been finding out, do not like people poking fun at their loos.

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  • 01 Sep 12. The eye of the storm

    Sat, 1 Sep 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kate Adie hosts correspondents' stories from the United States, Russia, France, Italy and the Czech Republic. The United States breathes a sigh of relief that Hurricane Isaac didn't turn into another Katrina. Alastair Leithead has been in the eye of the storm. The new 'skinheads'. Tom Esslemont tries to unpick what motivates Russia's ultra-nationalists. Just where did Julius Caesar REALLY defeat the Gaulls? Hugh Schofield investigates a case of alleged archaeological skulduggery in Burgundy. Alan Johnston meets the new Mayor of Palma, a member of the 'Five Star Movement' currently gaining political influence in Italy. And Rob Cameron makes a sentimental journey ... to a campsite in South Bohemia.

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  • 25 Aug 2012 Meeting the last Emperor of China

    Sat, 25 Aug 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kate Adie hosts reports from correspondents around the world. Mark Lobel attends a memorial service for the South African miners killed by police while striking for better pay and working conditions. Mike Thompson is 'embedded' with the army in the West African Republic of Mali. Can it win back the north of the country from Islamist militants? What do people in Ecuador make of the diplomatic stand-off between their government and the UK over the Julian Assange affair? Will Grant finds out. David Willey recalls his first visit to Beijing nearly fifty years ago - an extraordinary trip where he saw Chairman Mao and briefly met the last Emperor of China. As Italians enjoy the last few days of their annual August break at the seaside Dany Mitzman reflects on the contradictory charms of the Riviera Romagnola.

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  • 18 Aug 12. A Yankee Learns Farsi

    Sat, 18 Aug 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    French police have been placed on higher alert after rioting in the northern city of Amiens. Christian Fraser says the unrest poses a growing challenge to the new president, Francois Hollande. Government forces have been re-deployed from north-east Syria. Orla Guerin believes the Kurds, who've long wanted to establish their own homeland, see this as a window of opportunity. There've been more protests in Delhi against corruption in public life. But Mark Tully wonders if support for the anti-corruption movement is ebbing away. How will life change in Egypt now there's a president from the Muslim Brotherhood? It's a question exercising many including foreign visitors to Cairo like Edwin Lane. He speculates whether time might soon be called on the capital's thriving bar scene. And Daniel Nasaw tells of the difficulties and the embarrassments an American can face when he tries to get to grips with Farsi, the language of the Iranians.

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  • 11 Aug 12. A Return to the Countryside

    Sat, 11 Aug 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Chris Stewart is in Spain where some young people, unable to find employment in the cities in these austere times, are returning to work in the countryside. The agricultural sector's been holding up reasonably well as parts of the US economy take a hammering. But Paul Adams has been finding out that in the corn fields of Nebraska, drought is the main threat. Kate McGeown in the Philippines has been learning that the government in Manila is trying to bring home Filipina domestic workers caught up in the civil war in Syria. Peter Biles has been to the First World War battlefields of Gallipoli. His grandfather was killed there as Allied forces engaged in deadly trench warfare against Turkish troops. And Joanna Robertson explains why they say August in Paris is like a month of Sundays!

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  • 04 Aug 12. Life After Lonesome George

    Sat, 4 Aug 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Could Mogadishu be about to lose its title as the world's most dangerous city? Mary Harper says soon there'll be a new parliament and a new president in the Somali capital and there's hope the days of war, drought and famine could come to an end. The authorities in Yemen helped by the US have been taking the battle to al-Qaeda but Natalia Antelava says some believe hearts and minds are being lost in the process. Three years ago the north-eastern tip of Sri Lanka was the scene of the Tamil Tigers' last big battle against the Sri Lankan army. Charles Haviland's been allowed to visit the area. Henry Nicholls, who's been in the Galapagos Islands out in the Pacific Ocean, says people there are finding it hard to pick themselves up after the death of their most famous resident, the giant tortoise, Lonesome George. The annual Bayreuth Festival has been taking place in the south of Germany and Stephen Evans says that once again it's being stalked by controversy.

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  • FOOC 28 JUL 12: Battle for Aleppo

    Sat, 28 Jul 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Ian Pannell visits a school which has become a morgue for children in the Syrian city of Aleppo. James Harkin meets a Syrian whose chosen weapon, in his battle against the Assad regime, is a mobile phone rather than a gun John Sweeney's in Belarus. It's ruled, he says, by a regime so cocky it can't even be bothered to rebrand its secret police. They're still known as the KGB. Senegal's become the latest African country to grow melons for Europe. Susie Emmett joins workers who find time to take a break for a game of football. And is it more Lord of the Flies or Swallows and Amazons? Laura Trevelyan travels to the state of Maine to investigate the phenomenon that is the US summer camp.

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  • 21 JULY 12. Austerity or not?

    Sat, 21 Jul 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Pascale Harter's testing the mood in Spain in the week hundreds of thousands made clear their disapproval of the Madrid government's austerity measures. In France the new administration of President Francois Hollande wants to restore prosperity without applying too much austerity. But David Chazan says the difficulties are piling up for the new man in the Elysee Palace. The Nigerian economy is leaking millions. Will Ross has been to the Niger Delta to find out how people are helping themselves to the country's most valuable resource, oil. Linda Pressley tells the extraordinary tale of the travels of the corpse of Argentina's most famous First Lady, Eva Peron. While eight thousand miles from Buenos Aires, Mark Bosworth finds a hundred thousand Finns dancing the tango under the midnight sun.

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  • 14 JULY 12: An Unfinished Revolution

    Sat, 14 Jul 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    As speculation continues about who's won the election in Libya, Rana Jawad in Tripoli hears how "Libyan women face five problems: the father, the son, the husband, the brother and the working man!" Deep in the hills of Honduras Stephen Sackur's been talking to a man who's trying to escape the country's drugs and gang culture but fears he won't be allowed to succeed. In the week China released figures showing how its economy has slowed down, Michael Bristow leaves the country in, as he puts it, the midst of an unfinished revolution. Alan Johnston descends below ground level in Rome to learn a little more about the fears which beset Benito Mussolini in the final years of his dictatorship. And did you know bird spit can be big business? It is in Malaysia. Jenifer Pak's been finding out how the market's now being flooded by counterfeiters.

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  • 07 JULY 2012: Ghosts of Bush House

    Sat, 7 Jul 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Natasha Breed on how the population of Kenya's expanding fast, urban areas are eating up the countryside. And it's proving disastrous and sometimes fatal for the country's wildlife. A weird fungus which grows out of the heads of caterpillars is being harvested in parts of the Himalayas. Craig Jeffrey, who's been investigating, says it's proving a valuable cash crop for some of the mountain villagers. Latvia has the fastest-growing economy in Europe. Damien McGuinness has been to the capital Riga to see how they've made austerity cool. The Nigerian president's been speaking of the importance of family planning. The BBC's Jane Dreaper's been to a part of his country where having seven children is far from unusual. And Anna Horsbrugh Porter is one of the BBC World Service staff who're leaving their headquarters in London, Bush House in the Strand. She's been talking to colleagues about a much-loved broadcasting institution.

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  • 05 JULY 12: Shifting Sands

    Thu, 5 Jul 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Pauline Davies in the desert where nothing lives: the Atacama in Chile. But once thousands of miners lived here. Today ghost towns are all that remain. Andrew Harding on how the fears of those living in the Malian city of Timbuktu came to be realised when Islamist militants came to town and started to destroy their historic monuments. Could France be about to issue an apology to Algeria for the brutal events which led up to Algerian independence fifty years ago? Philip Sweeney wonders who exactly owes whom the apology? Of all the postings a correspondent might expect, one in the capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo Kinshasa was never going to be dull! Thomas Hubert looks back on his three and a half years there. And the dangers from Chernobyl have not come to an end yet. Patrick Evans says there's a real fear the summer heat could trigger radioactive wildfires with consequences which could be felt all over Europe.

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  • 30 June 12: Roman Austerity

    Sat, 30 Jun 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Churches and mosques are being targetted by the Boko Haram militant group in Nigeria. Will Ross has been to the northern city of Jos, a city he says feels like it's under seige. The Europe-wide debt crisis is increasingly being felt in Italy, where both prices and unemployment are soaring. Alan Johnston's in a suburb of Rome, hearing that people have begun to feel the pinch. It's fifty years now since Algerians won their battle for independence from France. Chloe Arnold in Algiers has been meeting a woman who feels she did her bit to liberate the country. Jim Carey's in Jordan, a kingdom which prefers hospitality to headlines and has a policy of being nice to everybody. And is conformism really a feature of the French psyche? It's a question which has been troubling Hugh Schofield on his morning runs around the Luxembourg Gardens in Paris.

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  • 28 June 2012: Bombs + Kebabs

    Thu, 28 Jun 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Ian Pannell tells us how the story of Robin Hood is proving popular with one of the Syrian rebel groups fighting to overthrow President Bashar al-Assad. Will Grant, on the campaign trail ahead of Sunday's election in Mexico, finds himself in what he describes as 'the most dangerous place I've ever been.' Hampi in India may once have been the heart of one of the biggest empires in Asia, but Anthony Denselow says it's increasingly drained of daily life. Damien McGuinness has been learning that pagan traditions emerge from the past - and the forest - when Latvians go out to celebrate midsummer. And Dany Mitzman reveals that at an Italian wedding food is more important than speeches - and confetti isn't something you throw, it's something you eat!

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  • 23 JUN 12: Folly of Empire

    Sat, 23 Jun 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Rumours and conspiracy theories swirl around Egypt; the Greeks fed up with being criticised for attitudes towards Europe; businessmen and environmentalists squabble over the River Danube in Croatia; how love, trolls and goblins help the Swedish government balance its books and musings on the folly of empire from half way up a volcano in Indonesia.

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  • 21 June 2012: Life Support

    Thu, 21 Jun 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Kevin Connolly has the latest from Cairo, awash with conspiracy theories after the authorities delayed the results of Egypt's presidential election. Jill McGivering's travelling across northern India investigating a growing water crisis. Major rivers are contaminated by pollution and wells are running dry. As delegates at the Rio conference study papers on future energy sources, Jonny Dymond's been to Kentucky where livelihoods built around coal mining are now in doubt. There's a building boom going on in the central African state of Chad but Celeste Hicks tells us it's still blighted by violence, poverty and disease. South Koreans are being urged to dress down now that high summer's arrived. But Lucy Williamson's been finding out they won't listen to entreaties that they should slip into something something cooler.

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  • 16 June 12: The Stone Breakers

    Sat, 16 Jun 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    All of Europe is watching the Greek elections. Chris Morris says they could have a profound effect on the Euro and on the future of the European Union. The child stone breakers of Madagascar. They toil all day every day. It earns them just a few coins. And, as Luke Freeman finds out, there's no question of them ever going to school. He was one of Cuba's revolutionary heroes. The funeral of boxer Teofilo Stevenson has just taken place in Havana. Sarah Rainsford was there and later talked to some of the Cuban athletes trying to emulate his Olympic success at this year's Games in London. Jackie Bird has been to Korea with some of the Britons who fought in the war there sixty years ago. It's a conflict which few in Britain commemmorate. But there, the soldiers were applauded and thanked. Fuchsia Dunlop dons her dancing shoes and heads out into Shanghai to get a glimpse of what this Chinese city must have been like during the glittering, decadent pre-war years.

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  • 14 June 2012: Burmese Bling

    Thu, 14 Jun 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Paul Mason meets protesters in Spain finding new ways to signal their worries and anger about how their government's tackling the financial crisis. Lucy Hooker declines to join the stampede of foreign customers in the gem markets of Rangoon in Burma. Rana Jawad contends that while Libya's in a state of 'civilised anarchy', its people believe near-anarchy now might be the price to pay for the tyranny of the Gaddafi years. As some European footballers have been taken to visit the site of Auschwitz in Poland, David Shukman has retraced his own family history in a nearby vilage. And Anu Anand went a good deal further than the Internet to delve into the roots of her family tree. Finding out about ten generations of Anands involved a trip to the River Ganges, special priests and a search for an ancient banyan tree.

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  • 09 JUN 12:Catholic Olympics

    Sat, 9 Jun 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    From Mogadishu -- Gabriel Gatehouse on how the al-Shabab militants have managed to lose friends and influence among the population of Somalia and given a boost to the African peacekeepers there Andy Martin's talking of a rift in the Irish church as Dublin prepares to welcome tens of thousands of Catholic visitors to the capital for an event some have called the 'Catholic Olympics.' A shaded graveyard in Kabul: Andrew North says the memorials there tell a story about Afghanistan's strategic value and the many times foreign soldiers have marched onto its soil Chancellor Merkel of Germany likes straight talking, Steve Evans in Berlin believes. During the visit to Berlin of prime minister Cameron, she used vocabulary British politicians would hesitate to voice in public. And the repressive policies of the apartheid era may be long gone but colour remains a preoccupation in South Africa as new mother, Tara Neill, has been finding out

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  • 07 JUN 2012: Destruction + Regeneration

    Thu, 7 Jun 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Alan Johnston's been to the Italian towns shaken by a series of earthquakes and aftershocks. In Pakistan, monsoon season is approaching again: Aleem Maqbool meets victims of last year's disastrous flooding amid concerns it could happen again. Hamilton Wende, a longterm resident of Johannesburg, believes it's shaking off a reputation for violence and urban decay. James McConnachie is in Nepal, where Chinese influence is bringing new road-building projects to the world's most dramatic mountain landscapes. And Roland Buerk is in Tokyo, where pets are pampered like nowhere else on earth.

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  • 02 JUN 12: Love Commandos

    Sat, 2 Jun 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Fergal Keane meets exiled Syrians in Istanbul and finds little agreement among them about the way forward for their troubled country. Gabriel Gatehouse is in eastern Congo where politics, history and nature have conspired to create instability and danger. David Willey talks of unrest and dismay at the Vatican as Cardinals plot and the Pope speaks of betrayal. Anu Anand's been meeting The Love Commandos in Delhi -- they help young couples who dare to get together without parental approval. And just ten miles from Wall Street and you're bathing in the Atlantic Ocean! Reggie Nadelson's in Brighton Beach, New York's most interesting ethnic enclave.

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  • 31 May 2012: Socket to me!

    Thu, 31 May 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Now Mitt Romney's secured the Republican nomination, will there be new scrutiny of his faith, Mormonism? Paul Adams is in the church's home state of Utah. They used to be labelled 'untouchables.' As Natalia Antelava's been hearing, India's Dalits say they are still being discriminated against even though the prejudice was officially outlawed. Peter Day returns from China with news that the days when every country had its own idea of what an electric plug should look like are numbered. What's in a name? In Cuba, the names get more eccentric by the day and Sarah Rainsford's been finding out why. And Jake Wallis Simons recently saw in Sweden how a single error can have far-reaching consequences, both in political life and on the football field.

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  • 26 May 12: Seaside Disappointment

    Sat, 26 May 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Jeremy Bowen in Beirut says the Middle East is certainly changing. But the dominoes aren't tumbling as quickly as some thought last year. Instead, the way ahead will be long and hard. Will Ross in Lagos on the fuel subsidy scandal and why for Nigerians the price of petrol is a constant preoccupation. Jonny Dymond takes to the skies over Arizona with a man determined to do his bit to reduce the flow of illegal immigrants into the US. The campest show of them all, Eurovision, has come to Baku in Azerbaijan. And Steve Rosenberg, who's there, says it's attended by awkward questions about human rights. And she was invited to a seaside tasting of some of Italy's finest fare. So what could possibly go wrong for Dany Mitzman?

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  • 21 May 12: Heroes and Villains

    Thu, 24 May 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Portia Walker: optimism in Yemen has been punctured by a devastating bomb blast in the capital. Alan Johnston: a state funeral has taken place in Sicily to honour a man who dared to take on the Mafia - and paid the ultimate price. Laura Trevelyan: the town in Mexico which has grown rich on the profits of sex trafficking. Matthew Teller: how the authorities in the Saudi capital Riyadh have transformed a public rubbish tip into lush parkland complete with lakes and walkways. and Bethany Bell: why the people of Vienna, who live in one of the world's most desirable capital cities, still seem to have plenty to moan about.

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  • 19 MAY 12: Nile Mystery

    Sat, 19 May 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kevin Connolly's in Luxor wondering if the military, which has controlled proceedings in Egypt since 1952, really will hand over power to civilians once the elections, starting next week, are over. Jonathan Head in Turkey notes that talks about joining the European Union have started up again. But does Turkey really need to join an EU worrying about economic catastrophe? David Belton's been to a remote part of New York state where the Amish religious sect has taken the question: can God really be wrong, to a court for judgement. Fuchsia Dunlop's been to one part of China where they don't find cheese alien and revolting And Mary Harper's been mingling with the Somali population in Dubai. And taking a drive, in some style, around the gleaming emirate.

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  • 12 May 12: Syrian Ghosts

    Sat, 12 May 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Many Syrian doctors and medical staff have fled the country as the violence there continues. Portia Walker's been talking to one of them in Turkey. The Arab Spring has failed to take root in Algeria. This week there were elections there and Chloe Arnold's been reflecting on the public reluctance to take part in a vote about the country's future. Hugh Sykes has been listening to opposing views about the state Pakistan's in. Some talk of its political stability; others of how it's ripe for revolution. Everyone, though, has a view about corruption there. A UN envoy, in Cambodia this week, spoke of how firearms were increasingly being used there against human rights activists. Guy Delauney considers this in the light of growing public controversy over land issues and illegal logging. And as the nude bathing season gets underway in Germany Stephen Evans tells a story of how cultural confusion over nakedness caused embarrassment in a Berlin gym.

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  • 05 May 12: Sunlounger economics

    Sat, 5 May 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    In a week full of elections near and far, Mark Lowen says Sunday's vote in Greece could be the most critical of them all. Justin Rowlatt is in Kenya noting a huge turnaound in the global economy -- while Europe and the USA are feeling the pain, the rest of the world is steadily getting richer. Petroc Trelawney's been to find out why a new town in Ireland has houses and a new railway station, but very few people. Lucy Ash is camping out in the Russian Arctic and seeing how Vladimir Putin's push for further energy supplies is affecting reindeer and their herders And Alan Johnston, touring the celebrated sights of Rome, tells us there's one particular statue which casts a chill shadow -- even on the sunniest of Spring days.

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  • 28 Apr 12: Congo warlord

    Sat, 28 Apr 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The British soldiers in Afghanistan have lost faith in their mission, there are fields full of opium poppies and the Taliban are everywhere. Quentin Sommerville talks of the mood among the troops as they prepare at last to return home. After Charles Taylor, who'll next be taken to court to face charges relating to war crimes? Fiona Lloyd Davies has been in the Democratic Republic of Congo meeting one former rebel commander who is wanted for trial. Ian Pannell has been talking to an English scholar in Syria whose library was destroyed as the struggle continues between protestors and the security forces. What makes Kenyan athletes such fine distance runners? Claudia Hammond's been jogging through the Great Rift Valley learning some of the answers. and Stephen Sackur went to Cairo to report on how the people's uprising there was faring but instead found himself captivated by a revolutionary TV chef whose recipes are being lapped up throughout the Middle East!

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  • 21 Apr 12: Asparagus fever!

    Sat, 21 Apr 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Bahrain: Rupert Wingfield Hayes examines why all sides in the bitter conflict there feel the controversy surrounding this weekend's Grand Prix can work in their favour. France: It's an election which lacks a feel-good factor. Perhaps, Chris Morris feels, that's why all the campaigners are looking back, at a vision of a romantic, glorious French past. Kenya: Mary Harper's in a huge refugee camp, run on international money, and contrasts life there with that in an impoverished village not far away. India: His mother warned him against walking on ice, but Paul Howard finds it's the only way to visit a remote community high in the Himalayas. Germany: Great excitement at the start of the white asparagus season. Steve Evans finds the vegetable dominating menus and conversation. But surely it's not an aphrodisiac?

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  • 14 April 2012

    Sat, 14 Apr 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Fergal Keane is on Turkey's border with Syria listening to the experiences of those seeking refuge from the violence. The rise - and fall - of Italy's House of Bossi. David Willey reports. Natalia Antelava uncovers what appears to be a secret programme to sterilize women in Uzbekistan. Justin Marozzi finds street life returning to the Somali capital Mogadishu, once the most dangerous city on earth. And Jon Donnison hears the Olympic dreams of one Libyan athlete.

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  • 07 Apr 12 Sarajevo

    Sat, 7 Apr 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Presenter Kate Adie's in Sarajevo along with Allan Little and Jeremy Bowen. All three of them correspondents who reported from the Bosnian war 20 years ago. Also today Owen Bennett Jones on a controversial group of Iranian exiles whose camp in Iraq is about to be closed down. Pascale Harter's in Iceland talking of life in a town which remains in the shade from October to February. While Simon Worrall goes to northern France with questions about what exactly happened in a battle more than seventy years ago.

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  • Libyan pets 31 Mar 12

    Sat, 31 Mar 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    What does a chaotic pet market have to tell us about Libya's transition from dictatorship to democracy? Kevin Connolly's been finding out. Refineries. Miles and miles of pipeline. Hundreds of workers from overseas. Antonia Quirke's learned they are all coming to a remote corner of Mozambique now there's been a huge gas find there. Drug-related violence is a major issue in the Mexican presidential election campaign, which has just got underway. Will Grant's in the capital city where even news of the most gruesome happenings now seems to cause little surprise or horror. Jonathan Fryer's been meeting a family hugely respected in Togo. Over the generations they've become known for producing twins -- regarded as particularly special in this part of west Africa. And how on earth did a man from the high Himalayas come to be serving Jewish culinary specialities in a store in Manhattan? The answer to that one comes from Reggie Nadelson.

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  • 24 Mar 12 Afghan New Year

    Sat, 24 Mar 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Afghans enjoy New Year celebrations but Lyse Doucet finds they are concerned about what the months ahead may bring John James travels to the west African state of Guinea-Bissau and finds unexpected charms amidst its shadows The Burmese are finding out that recent reforms in their country have encouraged tourists to return. Caroline Hawley has been seeing what it has to offer the international visitor The Egyptians are preparing to vote for a new president and Jon Leyne has been finding out there are hundreds of people who feel they should have the job Gavin Esler meets Chancellor Merkel in Berlin and considers to what extent Germans feel obliged to help the poorer nations of southern Europe

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  • Boybandmania 22 Mar 12

    Thu, 22 Mar 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    One Direction: behind the scenes with the boy band in the US. Arrest warrant issued for a former premier of the troubled Turks and Caicos Islands. Cambodian Americans deported from the US. Why the Eurovision Song Contest reminds one woman in Azerbaijan of losing her home. And the Brazilian port--- 900 miles from the sea.

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  • the Kony film. 17 March, 2012

    Sat, 17 Mar 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    A hundred million plus hits on the internet. Our Africa correspondent Andrew Harding on the film about warlord Joseph Kony and why it's received the thumbs down from an audience in Uganda. A group of former paramilitaries and police officers from Northern Ireland have been to South Africa to see how combatants in the apartheid era there are now trying to come to terms with their troubled past -- Fergal Keane joined them. 'A steady pulse of pleasure' as Simon Worrall sails to the fabled Spice Islands in the wake of the great nineteenth century naturalist Alfred Russell Wallace. Joanna Robertson's been to the cinema in Paris seeing how French children are being educated to become the film experts of the future. And Peter Day describes the extraordinary Chinese ghost town -- empty streets, half-finished buildings -- which suggests to some that the great real estate bubble there has finally burst.

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  • Benin Voodoo 15 Mar 2012

    Thu, 15 Mar 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    A voodoo priest visits in Benin; disappearances in Sri Lanka; a truce in Gaza and calls from Israeli intelligence; contemporary art arrives in the Kremlin; and specialist shops in Mexico's old city centre.

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  • March 10, 2012

    Sat, 10 Mar 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The fisherman who decided to sail TOWARDS the tsunami - Julian May hears his story as he drives around Japan a year after the tidal wave and nuclear emergency. Owen Bennett Jones has been meeting Syrians forced into making painful decisions by the ongoing fighting in their country. The BBC's moving out of Bush House in London and, for our man in Rome Alan Johnston, that's a cause of some sadness. Russia's often associated with having autocratic leaders and Tim Whewell's in the city of Krasnodar where many still revere the memory of the empress, Catherine the Great. And Will Ross receives an unexpected invitation to fly into troubled Somalia with the Ethiopian army.

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  • March 08, 2012

    Thu, 8 Mar 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The extraordinarily spry 80-year-olds of Shikoku: Peter Day's met them and tells us about the problems countries such as Japan and Britain face with their ageing populations. 'A match made in heaven.' Daniel Schweimler's impressed with the wines made in the Argentine region of Mendoza. Matthew Price finds Greeks deeply concerned about the further demands they're facing for austerity as efforts continue to secure another cash bailout from the EU and IMF What happens when Chinese villagers, incensed about land grabs, stand up against the authorities. Martin Patience, in Guangdong province, says they may have won the battle but they shouldn't feel too confident about winning the war. And Martin Plaut meets an extraordinary man close to the troubled border between Sudan and South Sudan: a doctor, determined to dodge danger and bring help to all who need it.

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  • March 3, 2012

    Sat, 3 Mar 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    'A revolution with almost no co-ordination or planning.' That was Ian Pannell's assessment as he toured northern Syria trying to work out the extent of the rebellion against President Assad. Meanwhile, James Harkin's in the capital Damascus where international sanctions are starting to leave their mark on everyday life. Rachel Harvey's been meeting a group of Burmese opposition figures recently released from long jail sentences. Do they believe the new government is genuinely committed to a process of reform? There's a story of connectivity, turtles and love from Huw Cordey in the central American state of Costa Rica. And how would you like to get the tea for 49 young children? Catherine Fellowes has been talking to a mum in Kenya who does it every day!

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  • FOOC 1 Mar 2012: Abbottabad, and Greeks in Germany

    Thu, 1 Mar 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Did you ever see bin Laden? Aleem Maqbool is in Abbottabad, Pakistan, where they've been bulldozing the compound where the al-Qaeda leader was killed by US special forces. The German public appears to be tiring of rescue packages for Greece and Steve Evans in Berlin has been hearing it's not easy being a Greek in today's Germany. David Loyn is in the Indian state of Bihar hearing the arguments for and against Britain's aid for India. Hugely increased fees at UK universities mean that more British students than ever before are enrolling in foreign places of learning. Sanchia Berg's to Harvard in the US. And Tom Burridge is in Barcelona where the regional politicians feel they're getting a raw deal from Madrid.

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  • 25 Feb, 2012

    Sat, 25 Feb 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Andrew Harding's in Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia -- how impressed have they been there with the international gathering in London aimed at restoring stability to their country? Gerry Northam's in Japan where, a year after the devastating earthquake and tsunami, they're wondering whether to dump nuclear power altogether. David Willis is looking at a ninety-year-old murder mystery in the Hollywood hills. An extraordinary tableau's revealed in a Cairo bar: Sara Hashash meets a soldier who, on his days off, joins demonstrators throwing stones at the military! And Aleem Maqbool is finding out why a town in Pakistan's north-west is known as Little Britain.

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  • 23 Feb 12

    Thu, 23 Feb 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Is al-Qaeda giving the people of Yemen something their government is not? It's a question explored by Rupert Wingfield-Hayes who's there in the wake of this week's election. Who wants to venture seven miles to the bottom of the Pacific Ocean? Rebecca Morelle tells us four competing teams are developing submarines to do just that. Christchurch in New Zealand is still far from rebuilt a year after the devastating earthquake there. Joanna Lester talks of a city centre in ruins and communities torn apart. The French province of Brittany has a great deal going for it but not, as Robert Colls has been telling us, much in the way of job opportunities. And Frank Gardner's taken to the skies off the coast of Somalia to see how an international force is dealing with the threat posed by pirates.

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  • 18 Feb 2012

    Sat, 18 Feb 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Guns remain the ultimate arbiter of disputes in post-Gaddafi Libya. And in Benghazi Gabriel Gatehouse says disarming the militias is a priority for the country's new leaders. Bill Law's been in Bahrain as violence between protestors and security forces has left many casualties in recent days. Justin Rowlatt meets a Brazilian who admits to cutting down swathes of Amazonian rainforest. But maintains he was doing what his government considered appropriate. There's growing resentment between the people of Hong Kong and Chinese mainlanders - Juliana Liu's been exploring the tensions... while in New York City Reggie Nadelson looks around a vast wedding emporium where you can spend thousands on a wedding dress - and many do!

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  • 16 Feb 2012

    Thu, 16 Feb 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    No need for expensive cab fares this time! The regime change in The Maldives proves a story Andrew North was able to cover entirely on foot. Can Greece ever come back from this crisis? Paul Mason's on the road to Patras encountering a deep sense of gloom. As relations between Russia and the West nosedive amid arguments over Syria, a tale from Steve Rosenberg about the time when two Englishmen used football to boost productivity in Russian textile factories. For Africa's big football match, the Cup of Nations final, Tamasin Ford was at a sweltering screening in a refugee camp in Liberia. And very different weather in County Mayo: the winds howl and the hail lashes down as Kieran Cooke inspects a structure causing controversy in the far west of Ireland.

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  • Feb 11, 2012

    Sat, 11 Feb 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    That windswept outpost of Britishness in the South Atlantic again causes tension between Britain and Argentina as the anniversary of the Falklands War approaches. Fergal Keane is in Buenos Aires where a longing to redeem the islands is deeply felt; Allan Little's in the capital of the Falklands, Port Stanley, finding out they are more concerned there about shortages of fruit, veg and eggs. Mark Lowen's our man in Athens where Greeks are becoming increasingly angry with the way their government's handling their debt crisis. Did you know the Republican presidential hopeful Rick Santorum's family comes from Lake Garda in northern Italy. No? Well nor did most of the people living there until Christine Finn told them! And Alastair Leithead's been to a village in southern Mexico to see how the government is trying to impress descendants of the great Mayan civilisation.

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  • 9 Feb, 2012

    Thu, 9 Feb 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    From Ambridge to Tunisia: Owen Bennett Jones meets a man at the heart of government power in Tunis who talks of The Archers and how Britain's the most Islamic country he's ever lived in. Michael Bristow finds the Chinese secret police not so secret as he tries to report on Tibetan protests in western China. The National Front in France hopes to be a significant force in the upcoming French elections -- Christian Fraser on how the party's changing under the leadership of Marine Le Pen. Rubbish is a hot political potato in Mexico City -- Will Grant's had a pungent day out with its binmen. And behind closed doors in Libya: it's a bride's day ... and as Saleya Ahsan tells us, it's not an occasion for the men!

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  • Feb 4, 2012

    Sat, 4 Feb 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    After a journey from the calm of a hotel lobby to a city centre ladies' outfitters and on to the drum-beating heart of Syrian protest, Tim Whewell confronts the question: how much longer will the regime of Bashar al-Assad survive? Alan Johnston tells us Italy's young are worried about the economy and the future -- and many are deciding to emigrate. As protestors in Russia prepare again to take to the streets in anti-Putin demonstrations, James Coomarasamy's testing the public mood outside the capital. Will Ross is in Addis Ababa where the latest Chinese contribution to Ethiopian life is dominating the landscape. And how do you deal with evil spirits, ghosts and fallen angels? Kate McGeown is in a consulting room behind a karaoke bar in the Philippines finding out!

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  • 2 Feb, 2012

    Thu, 2 Feb 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    A rich seam of frustration - over poverty, bad leadership and corruption -- is being mined by the Nigerian militants Boko Haram, according to Andrew Harding.The fall of Colonel Gaddafi, says David Willey in Rome, has given Italy an opportunity to breathe new life into its long relationship with Libya. Chris Bockman meets some of those who worked for the French in what was then Indochina who are now living quietly by the River Lot in south west France. Hamilton Wende took a luxury train through six southern African countries - the passengers soon noted life outside their gilded carriages was a lot less comfortable. And UNESCO reckons the Viennese cafe's worth adding to its list of intangible items of cultural heritage. Bethany Bell explains why there's a lot more than just apple strudel behind the counter.

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  • 28 Jan, 2012

    Sat, 28 Jan 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    From our own curmudgeon. Hugh Schofield finds reasons to be dyspeptic in Paris. Jeremy Paxman on why he says: let's hear it for the Chinese Communist party. Mary Harper visits the Ethiopian town at the centre of the world qat trade. Mark Doyle investigates the link between corruption and crisis in Nigeria while Gabriel Gatehouse explains how the job of uniting the divided factions in the new Libya becomes harder by the day.

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  • 26 Jan 2012

    Thu, 26 Jan 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Twenty-six planeloads of Libyans arriving in Amman: Matthew Teller on how the downfall of Colonel Gaddafi's providing an economic windfall for Jordan. Pauline Davies learns what's meant by marriage Papua New Guinea-style at the nuptials of her niece there - she was, it seems, a four-pig bride. Aidan Lewis finds himself the subject of police scrutiny as he explores the troubled relationship between Morocco and Western Sahara. Mark Tully's finding out if the residents of Delhi really do resent the fact that their city was created as the capital of the British Raj ... and Allan Little's been meeting some of those behind the creation of the European single currency - he asks them: what on earth's gone wrong?

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  • Jan 21, 2012

    Sat, 21 Jan 12

    Duration:
    29 mins

    BBC correspondents don't often go out gardening -- perhaps that's because it gives them a guilty conscience! At least it does Kevin Connolly in Jerusalem. He's been losing sleep over his lemon tree. Humphrey Hawksley's been meeting children in India who work, sometimes in poor conditions, to produce goods sold in shops on Western high streets. Owen Bennett Jones is in Pakistan where the agenda of the news anchors ranges from assassination and polical venality to gossip and who's had a hair transplant. Jeremy Bowen, heavily shadowed by government minders, tries to find out the degree of support for the campaign to oust the president Bashar al-Assad and Stephen Sackur has been to report in Yemen where a political vacuum seems to suit an al-Qaeda-backed insurgency.

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  • Jan 19, 2012

    Thu, 19 Jan 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The women are in charge - and the men don't seem to be doing much about it. Timothy Allen tells us that's how things are in one northeastern Indian state, where a nascent men's liberation movement is having little impact. Mark Lowen is in Libya, where one of the biggest problems facing the country's new rulers is disarming the many fighters who helped overthrow the dictator Colonel Gaddafi. One consequence of China's great migration, from country to town, is rising tension in some of the city areas where the migrants have set up home - Mukul Devichand's been investigating in the southern city of Guangzhou. Nick Haslam has been to Ecuador, finding out who must pick up the bill when the developed world asks a developing country to forgo economic growth in favour of the world's environment.

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  • Jan 14, 2012

    Sat, 14 Jan 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The Afghan women still suffering in silence - ten years after the fall of the Taliban. Caroline Wyatt, who's just back from Kabul, examines how their lives might change once the international community withdraws its troops from their country. Nick Thorpe's been to meet the president of Hungary - a man at the centre of a political and constitutional storm. Laura Trevelyan's in Haiti where, two years ago, a 35-second earthquake killed more than three hundred thousand people. She finds the process of reconstruction is still going on -- some say it's taking too long. Sara Hashash is in Cairo where they're trying to salvage what they can from thirty truckloads of ancient books, manuscripts and other documents damaged and destroyed during fighting in the capital last year and our Europe correspondent Chris Morris takes a break from talking about bail-outs and over-the-counter derivatives and heads off to Copenhagen for a heart-to-heart with the Queen of Denmark.

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  • Jan 07, 2012

    Sat, 7 Jan 12

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Can international pressure on the military-backed government in Burma be relaxed now a series of reforms is underway? Fergal Keane has been accompanying the British foreign secretary on his visit there and offers an assessment of latest developments there. A year after the assassination of the Governor of Punjab Owen Bennett-Jones has been to Pakistan to examine the impact that killing's had there. John Sweeney talks of how it may be eighty years since millions of Ukrainians died in a famine but the tragedy remains deeply controversial today. Libby Spurrier's just been for a cruise down the River Nile and says it's clear that ten months of instability in Egypt has proved devastating for that country's tourist industry. Stephen Sackur's been getting tips on gastronomy from the man behind what some say is the world's best restaurant and he's emerged with controversial suggestions about what you might want on your Christmas table next December!

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  • Dec 31, 2011

    Sat, 31 Dec 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Kate Adie on the months of the Libyan revolution which led up to the death of Colonel Gaddafi in October. A chance to hear again some of the BBC's senior correspondents filing on the long road to Tripoli and charting a revolution which stunned the world.

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  • BBC World Service Dec 30, 2011

    Fri, 30 Dec 11

    Duration:
    9 mins

    An American Dream: New Hampshire, 1996 Owen Bennett Jones introduces an archive despatch by Gavin Esler. In the runup to a Presidential election, he explored small-town America's values and aspirations in Manchester, NH. And as things are today, he found that corporate raiders, rising unemployment and out-of-touch Washington politicians were much on the electorate's mind.

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  • BBC World Service Dec 29, 2011

    Thu, 29 Dec 11

    Duration:
    10 mins

    Prisoners of Norilsk - a city frozen in time "A history of Soviet failure written in crumbling cement; a monument to a system which simply ran out of steam". Norilsk, 1994 Owen Bennett Jones introduces a despatch from Kevin Connolly in the city of Norilsk in the Arctic Circle. He met people who had suffered and survived there for decades under the USSR - and seemed likely to spend the rest of their lives in this remote outpost.

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  • BBC World Service Dec 28, 2011

    Wed, 28 Dec 11

    Duration:
    10 mins

    The Truth is Our Currency Owen Bennett Jones introduces an archive despatch from 1997 by Martin Bell. At a time when television news in particular had been focusing on the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia, journalism was wrestling with issues like the real meaning of 'objectivity' when reporting on wars, and the limits of neutrality.

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  • BBC World Service Dec 27, 2011

    Tue, 27 Dec 11

    Duration:
    10 mins

    The Road to Mandalay Owen Bennett Jones introduces an archive despatch from 1984. Veteran correspondent Bob Jobbins describes a journey through Burma's history and culture as he travels from Rangoon to Mandalay.

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  • BBC World Service Dec 26, 2011

    Mon, 26 Dec 11

    Duration:
    10 mins

    "The army was rotten to the core and could not put up a fight" - Kinshasa, May 1997 Owen Bennett Jones introduces an archive despatch from the country then still known as Zaire. Allan Little describes the last days of the Mobutu regime and the advance of Laurent Kabila's forces.

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  • Dec 24, 2011

    Sat, 24 Dec 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    A dead man's suitcase in Cape Town transports Tim Butcher from today's Africa via World War Two Italy to Renaissance Tuscany. The most cosseted pets in the world: it's no dog's life, says Joanna Robertson, for the pampered pooches of Paris. High in the Himalayas Joanna Jolly goes searching for a little yellow idol which once wreaked terrible vengeance. Allan Little shares some of the jokes which have fuelled the big news stories in years gone by and Petroc Trelawny on the extraordinary history of Odessa and its enduring passion for music.

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  • Dec 17, 2011

    Sat, 17 Dec 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The polar bear's back in the news - this time it's at the centre of controversy in Canada where some believe it's a far better animal to be the country's national symbol than the one which currently holds the honour, the beaver -- Lorraine Mallinder has been finding out that some Canadians reckon the beaver's just too boring for the job. At the end of another stressful week in the eurozone Chris Morris tells us that the Germans don't seem too concerned -- the Christmas party season's on their minds! The revolution's brought a new look to Libya but Tarik Kafala, who's been back to Tripoli after many years away, says not everything's changed. Jill McGivering's in Indian Kashmir where questions are being asked about thousands of unmarked graves. And a celebrated bookshop owner passed away this week in Paris and Christine Finn, who worked in his shop recently, tells us what made this store, over the bridge from Notre Dame, so special.

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  • Dec 10, 2011

    Sat, 10 Dec 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    'A political system which had considered itself as solid as rock has started to show cracks.' Steve Rosenberg's in Moscow on a weekend of more demonstrations. The Americans are preparing for their withdrawal from Iraq and Gabriel Gatehouse has been considering what exactly's been achieved during their nine years there. There's a view from Hungary where Nick Thorpe's been looking at how the country's affected by the crisis in the Eurozone. It's forty years since Bangladesh came into being and Mark Tully, who remembers the long struggle which preceded its birth, wonders if too much celebration of that anniversary will lead to further bitterness. And Linda Pressley's in eastern Cuba climbing mountains and asking awkward questions about the love life of Fidel Castro.

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  • Dec 3, 2011

    Sat, 3 Dec 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Being Italian is bad for your health! That's the contention from Bologna where winter is descending and a range of ailments, unknown to British correspondent Danny Mitzman, are making their presence felt! It's election time in the Democratic Republic of Congo and while you might expect the sounds of tear gas canisters being fired and angry argument about electoral fraud, Will Ross has encountered an orchestra playing Handel's Water Music! A bag of snakes tipped out in a government office in India - Craig Jeffrey says the incident's once again got the country talking about corruption. A book fair --and a beating up: Sara Sheridan in the United Arab Emirates on the issues surrounding the release from prison of a group of people accused of being disrespectful to a ruling family. And the American state of Iowa's preparing for its moment in the political sunlight. It's time for the caucuses, critical for Republicans hoping to become their party's candidate for the White House.

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  • Nov 26, 2011

    Sat, 26 Nov 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    'But of course there will be violence,' says one seasoned observer to Andrew Harding as he travels in the Democratic Republic of Congo wondering if Monday's election is a chance for Africa's wounded giant to get back on its feet. And there's another election, in Egypt, starting on Monday: Lyse Doucet joins a family whose window, overlooking Tahrir Square, offers a unique view of world history unfolding. Fergal Keane, who's been watching the opening of the Khmer Rouge trial in Cambodia, finds young people there more interested in the future than in their country's bloody past. Mark Lowen's in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia which lost the major part of its Jewish population to the holocaust and recalls the life of his own grandmother who once came face to face with the commandant of a Nazi death camp. And why James Harkin, chasing revolutionaries in Syria, found himself drawn, repeatedly, to what he claims is the best ice cream shop in the world!

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  • Nov 19, 2011

    Sat, 19 Nov 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Are the generals in Egypt really about to relinquish power? Stephen Sackur in Cairo takes a closer look at the Tahrir Square revolution as Egyptians prepare to cast their votes. David Loyn's in Burma where vested interests, the cronies they're sometimes called, look on to see what will happen with the leaders' programme of reforms; Lucy Ash is in the Republic of Dagestan, on the shores of the Caspian Sea, where bomb attacks and shootouts on an almost daily basis make this the most volatile corner of the Russian Federation; Mike Thomson explains why Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan, has become a 'closed city' but says it pays to get to know it better and Alastair Leithead's on a whirlwind tour of Colombia - he gets an apology from the president and tells us how gold has become the country's new cocaine.

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  • Nov 12, 2011

    Sat, 12 Nov 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    "That's nobody's business but the Turks'." A quote from one of several songs which feature Turkey which are in turn quoted by Kevin Connolly as he talks about why the country remains keen to join the EU despite the Union's problems with debt and insecurity. Hugh Sykes is in Rome as prime minister Silvio Berlusconi's reported to be on the verge of resignation - he wonders why a country which does so many things so well, and manufactures so many goods coveted worldwide, can find itself in such trouble. A new property law's been introduced in Havana - Peter Day tries to answer the question: does this mean the grip of Castro-style Communism is being relaxed? Justin Rowlatt sends a despatch from Varanasi in India where the traditional practice of cremating bodies continues by the River Ganges. And you have to be fit to trek across the Pyrenees. We find out how Edward Stourton got on as he retraced the wartime route of the hundreds who used that route to escape from Nazi-occupied Europe.

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  • Nov 10, 2011

    Thu, 10 Nov 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    'Prosperity for all!' That was the Ugandan president's promise as he stood for re-election but today, as Rob Young's been finding out, there's growing discontent at steeply rising food and fuel prices. There are accusations in Kyrgyzstan of persecution of the Uzbek minority in the south of the country -- Natalia Antelava, who's been investigating, says the official line is that reconciliation's well underway after vicious ethnic clashes there last year. Huw Cordey records that the image of Colombia is slowly changing now that government forces appear to have the upper hand in the long battle against the FARC rebels. Not all the British servicemen stationed in Germany will be coming home -- Chris Bowlby's been meeting some who plan to stay on there. And Vincent Dowd's been visiting a Philadelphia museum which offers a window onto recent American history ... and some rather fine singing too!

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  • Nov 05, 2011

    Sat, 5 Nov 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    America has the Wild West, Russia has its Wild East. And Reggie Nadelson's there, in the port of Vladiovostok. The city, once closed to foreigners, is getting a big makeover. It'll be the new San Francisco, some claim. Paul Moss is in Athens where it's been a week of uncertainty and high political drama. Herman Cain is the choice of many Republicans to be the man to contest next year's presidential election. But his campaign's been sidelined by allegations of sexual harrassment. Mark Mardell's joined him on the campaign trail. There's a new rail line in Jerusalem. Matthew Teller says it provides interesting travel possibilities but it's also proving controversial. And Hugh Schofield's been to the south of France to talk to the iconic fashion designer Pierre Cardin and hear how he saw off all his rivals.

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  • Nov 03, 2011

    Thu, 3 Nov 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Silvio Berlusconi attends the G20 meeting in Cannes amid mounting alarm in Italy about the country's debt crisis -- Manuela Saragosa's been meeting some Italians who feel Mr.Berlusconi's become a liability and should resign. The G20 meeting is reported to be considering taking Chinese money to help bail out the beleaguered Eurozone. Much of the new Chinese wealth is in the hands of the private sector; Michael Bristow's been having lunch with an industrialist who's one of the country's new super-rich. Tamasin Ford's in Liberia ahead of next week's election runoff and hears concerns about intimidation of the media there. Damien McGuinness, our man in Tbilisi, has been examining the difficulties women in Georgia face in the workplace and in the home while Trish Flanagan has been sampling the wares at the celebrated English Market in the Irish city of Cork.

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  • Oct 29, 2011

    Sat, 29 Oct 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The appointment of a white vice president in Zambia indicates, according to Fergal Keane, that for Africa's whites, the long journey towards feeling they have a future as of right on the continent is finally underway. David Willey in Rome tells of Italian scepticism about their prime minister's ability to deliver on the promises he's made to EU-leaders about the implementation of austerity measures in Italy. Horatio Clare's aboard a vast container ship in the South China Sea finding out how economic hard times have been affecting life on the ocean wave. There's an incident in the High Pamir as John Pilkingon's dragged, feet first, into an icy river and much talk about the sort of food you can find in German canteens, and what it tells you about its eaters, from our own correspondent in the German capital, Steve Evans.

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  • Oct 27, 2011

    Thu, 27 Oct 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    A dystopian vision of Venice - Rachel Harvey's words as she watches the flood waters approaching Bangkok's city centre. Allan Little, covering the historic first Arab Spring election in Tunisia, says there aren't many days in a life spent chasing news that are as unremittingly positive as this! Jennifer Pak's in Kuala Lumpur reporting on a controversy in Malaysia over a proposal to extend Islamic law. Garreth Armstrong visits the South African town of Mafeking -- once the scene of a British military triumph, today a peaceful place with more interest in the arts than in history. And Alex Kirby takes a boat trip in Ukraine and finds that when something as finite and crucial as water has to be shared between competing needs, there are inevitably losers. The programme's introduced by Kate Adie.

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  • 22 Oct 2011

    Sat, 22 Oct 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Gabriel Gatehouse describes the scenes at that infamous sewer pipe, where Colonel Gaddafi was found. Kevin Connolly wonders if Gaddafi will be the last of the "grotesque, blood-stained buffoon dictators." Peter Day is in Argentina, which famously defaulted on its massive foreign debts but now appears to be flourishing - could this be a lesson for Greece? Jamie Coomarasamy visits the campaign headquarters of Marine Le Pen, the head of France's far-right Front National; and Jon Silverman is with Africa's real Number One detectives, in Botswana.

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  • 20 Oct 2011

    Thu, 20 Oct 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kate Adie introduces reports from around the world. Today Jonathan Head ask what keeps the fighters in Libya going, risking their lives, when perhaps they don't really have to? Sue Lloyd Roberts experiences life trapped in your own flat, with young children, in the middle of the Syrian revolution. The Arab Spring began with Tunisia's Jasmine Revolution, in January. Now they are preparing to vote and Celeste Hicks hears of the disappointments and hopes of young people, and the confusion as people grapple with the trappings of democracy. And Jonathan Barker tells us how the Asian Tsunami has had benefits for the Orang-utans of Sumatra - but watch out for your fingers!

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  • 15 Oct 2011

    Sat, 15 Oct 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Is the name of Bahrain being dragged into the mire by a string of alleged human rights abuses? Frank Gardner gives his assessment after meeting the King and the Prime Minister - and joining the riot police on patrol. Yolande Knell in Cairo says that with every month that has passed since President Mubarak was overthrown, public frustration has mounted. Katya Adler's investigating the scandal in Spain of the so-called 'ninos robados' or stolen children - sold off to 'more deserving' parents. A long way from Abidjan and a long way from Monrovia: John James is in that part of Ivory Coast close to Liberia and sometimes referred to as the 'Wild West.' It's a part of the country which was hard hit during the struggle, earlier this year, for the country's presidency. And Andrew Harding talks to Zargana, his friend the Burmese comedian, who's just been released from a 59-year prison sentence. Jeeves and Wooster, Andrew hears, were a great comfort in his cell.

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  • 13 Oct, 2011

    Thu, 13 Oct 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    'I'll Not Do It Again!' That's the verdict of some foreign businessmen, out of pocket after getting involved in the Indian market. Mark Dummett in Delhi examines whether this is really a difficult country in which to do business. Embarrassment for the French state: Chris Bockman on how it's having to pick up the hotel bills of radicals who were once convicted of trying to blow up the Eiffel Tower. Tamasin Ford visits the centre of the diamond trade in Sierra Leone while Michael Bristow meets the members of one of Shanghai's neighbourhood committees - the front line of Chinese government. And with two weeks to go until the Irish go to the polls, Kieran Cooke recalls early encounters with Martin McGuinness, the former IRA man who now wants to be Ireland's next president.

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  • 08 Oct 2011

    Sat, 8 Oct 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Why two crumpled pieces of paper are among the most precious reminders Lyse Doucet has of her reporting trip to beleaguered Syria; Nick Danziger's been back to Kabul and wondered why the voices of Afghan women are too often ignored; Steve Evans in Berlin reflects on the row surrounding the return of twenty skulls to Namibia; building a new nation is never easy, but now Rosie Goldsmith tells us that South Sudan faces an additional challenge as it tries to introduce English as the official language; and Hugh Schofield in Paris on how new technology has breathed fresh life into the ghosts of Montparnasse cemetery.

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  • Oct 6, 2011

    Thu, 6 Oct 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    A time of shifting and unexpected new relationships in Libya is explored by Allan Little. He's been meeting the Islamists, determined not only to be a part of the post-Gaddafi government but also to forge a new working relationship with the West; Chris Morris talks of the crisis in the Eurozone after visiting Greece, the Netherlands and five other European countries; it's fifty years since the people of Tristan da Cunha were evacuated as a volcano erupted on their island in the South Atlantic -- today, Chris Carneghy says their lifestyle's being challenged by developments in the modern technological world; Dany Mitzman talks of an anti-Mafia television station in Sicily which is under threat from new Italian legislation while Rajesh Mirchandani chews over the complications of South Africa's diverse history.

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  • Oct 1, 2011

    Sat, 1 Oct 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    An 18-hour train ride to the end of the line brings you to the very edge of Norway. Inside the Arctic Circle. But why is it that this place has such firm connections with Italy. Christine Finn has the answer. Justin Webb examines a Japanese conundrum: the country benefits from its cultural insularity and yet, if it doesn't open up to outsiders, it faces economic decline. Mark Lowen, charting the mood in Athens as international investigators assess the creditworthiness of Greece, talks of clouds of tear gas and despair closing over a troubled country. In the Pakistani city of Karachi, the American consulate moved to a new location. Mohammed Hanif says it has meant the reopening of an historic park and armed guards being replaced by youngsters playing cricket. And you used to have to go America's Great Plains for a glimpse of the mighty bison. Not any more. Rob Cameron tells us why it can now be seen wandering around a place that used to be a training ground for the Russian Red Army.

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  • 29 Sept, 2011

    Thu, 29 Sep 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    They came from all over: serious men from Seville and Madrid with their fine suits and Havana cigars to see the last bullfight in the historic stadium in Barcelona. Robert Elms was also there to witness the final show. Attempts to clamp down on the highly lucrative trade in mineral smuggling in eastern Congo have not proved successful, as Conor Woodman has been finding out. North Korea might not seem to be a country with the latest in communications technology but, as Lucy Williamson tells us, the leadership there are finding ways of making it work for them. Paul Adams goes to a country music show in the US and hears how the genre has embraced the anger of a generation poleaxed by economic hardship. And Trish Flanagan joins tens of thousands who arrived in a remote corner of the Republic of Ireland to watch a game of golf.

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  • 24 September 2011

    Sat, 24 Sep 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kate Adie shares stories behind the headlines with correspondents around the world. David Loyn is at the funeral of Burhanuddin Rabbani reflecting on the return to prominence of Afghanistan's warlords. Tim Mansel looks at the intimate relationship between football and politics in Turkey. Roland Buerk explains why the residents of Tokyo are cancelling the leases on their high rise apartments. Damien McGuiness is in the disputed territory of Abkhazia and Andrew Harding has the opportunity to check out a Libyan hospital .... as a patient.

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  • 22 Sept 11

    Thu, 22 Sep 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Katie Adie presents more despatches from foreign correspondents. As forces try to oust Gaddafi loyalists holding out in his home town of Sirte, our correspondent Alastair Leithead ponders the dilemmas of keeping the story in the news. In Pakistan, the monsoon season has left thousands homeless once again; Aleem Maqbool travels through Sindh, one of the worst-affected provinces, and find people feeling abandoned by their government and the world. We get up close and personal as Robin Irvine takes part in a wrestling match on the grasslands of Eastern Mongolia. In Beirut, appearances are everything, even when giving birth, as Georgia Paterson Dargham finds out. And in New England, Julian May discovers why lobster fishing is apparently helping to increase the crustacean's numbers.

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  • Sept 17, 2011

    Sat, 17 Sep 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Reprisals and revenge in a desert oasis as the battles continue against the final Gaddafi loyalists -- Justin Marozzi's been learning of the tensions in a small community in the far south of Libya. Katy Watson in Doha on how the Gulf state of Qatar was one of the first countries to declare its support for the Libyan rebels and how it is now reaping the benefits. Jonathan Head, who accompanied Turkish premier Erdogan on part of his North African tour, contends that a Turkish leader, elevated to the status of an Arab champion, is extraordinary. Claudia Hammond is in Costa Rica: tle elderly there reach a greater age than in any other nation in the Americas but the burden, she tells us, hangs heavily on the country's healthcare system. And Daniel Schweimler took some long bus trips and walked a great distance to visit a remote part of Argentina which is almost untouched by the modern world.

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  • Sept 15, 2011

    Thu, 15 Sep 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    How did the lifeboat of the North Atlantic, as it's called, manage to cope with thousands of unexpected air passengers? Jo Fidgen is in Gander, Newfoundland, with a story of 9.11 kindness. In Sudan, there are fears of a new offensive by government troops once the rains have stopped -- Julie Flint's in the Nuba mountains in the south. Nick Thorpe's at a monastery overlooking the River Danube in Romania. There they've been celebrating a holy day when people come to have their ailments washed away by holy water. Thomas Dinham tells of a febrile atmosphere in the Egyptian capital, Cairo, in the days after a mob laid seige to the Israeli embassy there. And in the week when the president of the European Commission spoke of a fight for our political and economic future, Paul Henley argues that increasingly Europe is becoming a continent of extremes.

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  • Sept 10, 2011

    Sat, 10 Sep 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Whatever happened to his notebooks? Jeremy Bowen, charting the demise of the Gaddafi regime in Libya, wonders why his precious notebooks keep going missing. Mishal Husain travels though five countries finding out about the role Twitter and Facebook have played in the Arab Spring. Thousands of Zimbabwean children have been making a long, risky and illegal journey south in search of a place in a South African schoolroom; Mukul Devichand's been metting some of them. Lesley Curwen's been to the US to find out how families are getting by during the economic downturn. And in Ireland, Fergal Keane sees signs of hope and optimism after the worst banking crisis and recession in the country's history.

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  • Sept 3, 2011

    Sat, 3 Sep 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The day after history was made in Libya Kevin Connolly was out shopping -- and tells a story of a capital city trying to return to normal. Few parts of the United States have escaped the economic downturn -- as Jonny Dymond's been finding out on a Main Street in North Carolina; Fiona Lloyd-Davies has been meeting a woman in the Democratic Republic of Congo who's been helping thousands of victims of rape. Summer may have been something of a damp squib in the UK but Huw Cordey's been to Death Valley in California where it's been scorchingly hot. And back to Tripoli in Libya where Andrew Hosken's been learning about the dangers of what they're calling 'celebratory gunfire.' What goes up, he's told, must always come down!

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  • July 27, 2011

    Sat, 27 Aug 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The Arab-Israeli conflict seems to have been sidelined in this year of revolutions. But our Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen tells us that it hasn't gone away, and the signs are not good. It was 37-degrees at the Italian air base where Jonathan Marcus has been to meet some of the pilots flying NATO missions over Libya -- but not too hot for them all to tuck into a full English breakfast while Jonathan inquired: how much have the pilots contributed to the rebels' success in and around Tripoli? They've been celebrating twenty years of independence in Estonia and, not surprisingly, we find they've been doing it in song. Kieran Cooke's been to Shangri-La. This town in western China is supposed to be as close as you can get to an earthly paradise, but Kieran's not entirely convinced. And call him a hypochondriac but our man in the Hollywood hills, David Willis, is more than a little scared when he opens up an email telling him if he's likely to get Parkinson's or Alzheimer's.

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  • BBC Radio 4, 20 Aug 2011

    Sat, 20 Aug 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    'Politics at its most brutal, its most basic, democracy as a demolition derby.' That's Mark Mardell's view as he contemplates months of Republican infighting ahead of next year's US presidential election. The Moscow coup of twenty years ago: Bridget Kendall, who was there during that eventful August back in 1991, says it could so easily have succeeded. The smiles seem to have faded somewhat in newly-independent South Sudan but Robin Denselow, just back from the capital Juba, says they still revere their cattle. David Hargreaves has been attending a spectacular riverside religious festival in central India and Karishma Vaswani's had to call in the Indonesian witch doctor after strange goings-on at her house in Djakarta.

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  • BBC Radio 4, 13th August 2011

    Sat, 13 Aug 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Aleem Maqbool reports on Karachi, where inter-ethnic violence between Urdu speakers and Pashtuns has killed hundreds in the last few months; as Sonia Gandhi receives medical treatment in the US, Mark Tully explores her enduring political power in India, despite the fact that she holds no government office; Orla Guerin is in Misrata, in Libya, where rockets still threaten civilians and little appears to have changed for the better; Sudan is now officially divided into two and Sudanese pride, especially in the north, has taken a battering - James Copnall describes how national hopes lay with a horse called Diktator at the Sudanese Derby; and despite their economic woes, Jake Wallis Simons sees how the Portuguese still found a way to celebrate, with trays full of bread.

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  • BBC Radio 4 August 6th 2011

    Sat, 6 Aug 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Mexico's drug wars are notoriously violent and the killings have spread to neighbouring Guatemala. Linda Pressly has been to the scene of a gruesome massacre in northern Guatemala. The "indignados" in Spain began their protests in May, angry at the banks and at the way the government has responded to the economic crisis with spending cutbacks, privatisations and redundancies. Sarah Rainsford recently joined some of the young indignants on the road. Colombia's "Red Zone" is traditionally a no-go area for medics and journalists. But Imogen Foulkes has travelled upriver in this area - long fought over by drug cartels, FARC rebels and the Colombian military. Government cutbacks across Europe, particularly spending cuts for social programmes, are sometimes hitting the most vulnerable hardest. Emma Jane Kirby has been spending time with those who have fallen onto hard times in Paris. Why is it that Poles love to dress up as knights at the weekend? Adam Easton has been finding out.

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  • July 30th 2011

    Sat, 30 Jul 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Today: Peter Svaar finds out that the man behind the killings in Norway was his class mate and friend. Charles Haviland visits northern Sri Lanka to see if life is returning to normal there. Justin Rowlatt examines if Iceland, which refused to pay off its debts, offers a solution to Europe's economic woes? Christine Finn gets a peek into the secretive world of bobbins, skeins and "metiers" with the lace makers of France. And we hear from Oliver Bullough why Russian officials, not known for their smiles, are now beaming at babies.

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  • July 23, 2011

    Sat, 23 Jul 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Will Thursday's eurozone agreement be enough to save the European single currency and the union of European nations? Chris Morris in Brussels considers the deal designed to prevent the debt crisis from spreading. Michael Buchanan was in Helmand province Afghanistan as the city of Lashkar Gah was returned to Afghan control. For the westerners leaving, he says, their job was far from done. Some Ethiopian girls are getting married at the age of five and Claudia Hammond has been finding out about the efforts being made to stamp out the practice of child marriage. Ever wondered what sound a post-coital baboon makes? Wonder no longer. Jake Wallis Simons imitates it as part his extraordinary story about the Australian much more at home in the real jungle than its urban equivalent. And Berlin's a city noted for its counterculture, its anti-establishment stance. Steve Evans is there exploring its more gentle side.

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  • July 16, 2011

    Sat, 16 Jul 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Could the Libyan rebels be poised to march on the capital Tripoli? Gabriel Gatehouse, who's been spending time with them near the coastal city of Misrata, doubts they have the capability for military victory; Andrew Hosken's just returned from Somalia where the rains have failed again, drought has taken hold and many people are in danger of starving to death; a battle between modernity and an older way of doing things is underway in the Indian state of Orissa and Justin Rowlatt's been finding out that in this case, the modern world might be about to lose out; Chris Simpson's in the Gambia where the president has made it clear that he has a low opinion of journalists -- the media people, on the other hand, complain of harrassment and worse. And from the Seychelles out in the Indian Ocean, a tale from Tim Ecott about the extraordinary coco de mer; a coconut tree with erotic connotations.

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  • July 9, 2011

    Sat, 9 Jul 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    They are celebrating in Juba, the capital of South Sudan, the world's newest country. But Fergus Nicoll, who's there, says its leaders must address some of the lessons they've been handed down by history. Who's visiting the great archaeological sites in Libya as the conflict in that country continues? Justin Marozzi's just been to one of them and had little company there other than cows and goats. David Willey in Rome talks about the country's much respected President Giorgio Napoletano and explains how he's trying to rein in some of the activities of the controversial prime minister Silvio Berlusconi. India's caste system was supposed to have been done away with decades ago but Craig Jeffrey, in Uttar Pradesh, has found that in many areas of life, it simply has not gone away. And it's proving a sweltering summer in the city of Algiers and Chloe Arnold, who lives there, has been finding out how a Scottish firm is keen on securing a slice of the market in long, cool, fizzy drinks!

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  • July 7, 2011

    Thu, 7 Jul 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The end of the world is nigh! Well, it is according to one estimate. But Chris Bockman who's in the French Pyrenees says there's a village there where you might just be safe. Much joy's being reported in South Sudan. Peter Martell's in this region which has experienced generations of civil war but is now getting ready to usher in independence. Could the mighty US be about to default on its debts? Lesley Curwen says the government in Washington's been given a deadline by which time it must pay up. But before that can be achieved, Republicans and Democrats must sort out their differences. Alex Renton's been learning that these are tough times in Armenia but still there's pride in the country's fine brandy which was, so they say, a favourite of Winston Churchill's. And Emily Lethbridge has been finding out that a good place to research the mediaeval sagas of Iceland is a petrol station, not far from the capital Reykjavik.

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  • July 2, 2011

    Sat, 2 Jul 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The Greek austerity bill may have been passed by the Athens parliament, but Justin Rowlatt's wondering if anyone expects it to be fully implemented. It may be one of the most polluted cities in the world but Delhi, as Anu Anand has been finding out, is home to an astonishing collection of bird life. The Libyan Mediterranean city of Misrata is still coming under rocket fire from troops loyal to Colonel Gaddafi, but Andrew Harding's been seeing that families still enjoy an afternoon at the beach there. Thaksin Shinawatra may be living in self-imposed exile in Dubai but Rachel Harvey, who's been there to meet the former Thai prime minister, says he's still dominating discussion about the upcoming Thai election. And is the Amazon a resource to be exploited or one simply to be protected - questions Robin Lustig's had in mind during his travels in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso.

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  • June 30, 2011

    Thu, 30 Jun 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Now the Greek parliament's voted for austerity, large numbers of people working in the country's huge public sector are waiting to see where first the axe will fall -- Manuela Saragosa's in Athens. Saving cash is a theme throughout Europe and Mark Lobel's been to Strasbourg where some say the city should no longer be a base for the European Parliament, it's just too expensive. Venezuelan security forces are said to have been tunnelling INTO a jail to try to resolve a riot inside. Sarah Grainger in Caracas on the state of Venezuela's chaotic prison system. Chris Hogg's in Shanghai where, ninety years ago, the Chinese Communist Party was formed. He examines some of its founding principles and assesses how relevant they are today. And it's been a sad week for supporters of the Argentine football club River Plate. Their team has been relegated to a lower division. But isn't football just a game? Daniel Schweimler, who's in Buenos Aires, says that in Argentina, it's much more than that!

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  • June 25, 2011

    Sat, 25 Jun 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The lights go out in the United States. It's only a simulation at present but Mark Mardell in Washington says it's evidence the US military is taking seriously the threat of war in cyberspace. Inside the walls of a prison in the Horn of Africa our correspondent Mary Harper is surprised by a demand for an interview ... from a Somali pirate! Misha Glenny reflects on the EU's decision to admit Croatia to full membership:proof, he believes, that a powder keg has finally been defused. Rupert Wingfield Hayes has an account from inside the Bahrain courtroom where a number of people were sentenced to life imprisonment after being found guilty of trying to overthrow the country's royal family. And Andrew Martlew's been walking in the mountains of northern Italy tracking down some rarely visited British war graves.

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  • June 23, 2011

    Thu, 23 Jun 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    A voice from Croatia's war-torn past is recalled by Allan Little in Zagreb as the EU prepares to admit this country to full membership of the Union. Chris Morris is in Athens as Greece faces fresh hurdles in its attempts to avoid defaulting on its debt repayments. Lobsters are big business but in Nicaragua, as Conor Woodman's been hearing, catching them can be dangerous. Reggie Nadelson tells us how the price of property's soaring in Harlem, a part of New York once associated with poverty and crime. But, she wonders, is the price of development the loss of the district's soul? It's all change on the buses in Malta. Jake Wallis Simons has been finding out that the island's getting rid of its fleet of characterful and individualistic buses and replacing them with something altogether more modern and efficient. But, it seems, not all the islanders welcome the change.

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  • June 18, 2011

    Sat, 18 Jun 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The ultimate failed state. That's what some call Somalia in the Horn of Africa. Peter Greste is in the capital Mogadishu, perhaps the most dangerous city in the world. He's finding out why thousands of Somalis are leaving homes in the countryside and flooding in to the city? Another mass migration's going on in China. But, as Juliana Liu tells us, difficulties can lie ahead for the country people heading for town in search of a better life. Paul Henley's been looking at an economic boom that's lifting parts of Poland; one port city's described as the future Sydney and Dubai of the Baltic. The worst drought in fifty years has hit Texas. Jonny Dymond finds one rancher whose fortunes are suffering -- but he says he's battling on: it's the American way. And she's called the Miss Marple of the Himalayas; Joanna Jolly meets the woman who keeps climbers in Nepal roped to the truth.

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  • June 16, 2011

    Thu, 16 Jun 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Tunisia's fragile revolution is under threat from the violent uprising in Libya. Pascale Harter, investigating in these borderlands, also reveals what a football commentary sounds like in Libya where the only name permissible is that of Gaddafi. The blockade on Gaza means that many people living in that territory never get to leave. Jon Donnison's been meeting two men, at the Erez crossing into Israel, who get nearer than most. Cheung Chau island, not far from Hong Kong, has become notorious as a place where people go to kill themselves. Claudia Hammond's been there finding out how the local community is trying to change all that. Need to cure a headache? Or impotence? A remedy can be found at a traditional medicine market in Johannesburg. Stewart Maclean's been there to see what's on offer. And Rajesh Mirchandani enjoyed what some would consider the perfect posting - as our man in California. And yet, he has some rather controversial views to share with us about the sunshine state.

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  • June 11, 2011

    Sat, 11 Jun 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The bloody events in Syria are making the government in neighbouring Turkey uneasy, as Hugh Sykes has been finding out on the eve of the Turkish general election there; Chris Hogg's in Taiwan where, amid a thawing in relations with mainland China, there are businessmen who are prospering in the new climate of detente; corruption in India is now so pervasive, it reaches even the smallest country village but, as Craig Jeffrey's been hearing, it can still be a joking matter; there's a ban on divorce in the Philippines, but Kate McGeown tells us, there are ways around the ban, particularly if you have money; one of our most seasoned travellers, the reporter and presenter Robin Lustig's visited 75 countries without losing his luggage. Surely his luck can't last ...?

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  • June 9, 2011

    Thu, 9 Jun 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Amid uproar in and around Syria, Kevin Connolly considers suggestions that there have been attempts by the authorities in Damascus to manipulate the news agenda to distract the world from events going on in their country. A year after violent disturbances in the Kyrgyz town of Osh Rayhan Demytrie, who covered those events, considers the difficult legacy they've left in their wake; Tracey Logan is in the Republic of Ireland examining how an EU directive, aimed at protecting Ireland's peat bogs, is being widely flouted. Tom Blass takes a walk in a Belgian village which has been swallowed up by the inexorable growth of Antwerp's docklands. And South Korea's a country which takes recycling very seriously -- it's causing our correspondent there, Lucy Williamson, some difficulty.

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  • June 4, 2011

    Sat, 4 Jun 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    A mysterious encounter with the sinister Colonel Tariq, thought to be from Pakistani Intelligence, is described by Aamer Ahmed Khan. Tim Whewell's in the Sinai Desert finding a roaring trade in rifles. A guided tour of Benghazi with Andrew Hosken: he is told that Colonel Gaddafi couldn't make the railways run on time -- he couldn't make the railways either! An acute housing shortage in Beijing is described by Martin Patience - it's meant people living in air raid shelters, bunkers and tunnels. And there's joy and some plum brandy in the foothills of the Carpathians as Caroline Juler joins a cheerful crowd of farmers at their annual measuring of sheep's milk.

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  • June 2, 2011

    Thu, 2 Jun 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The E.coli outbreak in Germany is the subject of a despatch from Steve Evans in Berlin who's been finding out how it's sending ripples throughout Europe, affecting sales of fruit and vegetables and altering families' eating habits. As General Mladic prepares to face war crimes charges in The Hague, Nick Thorpe's been touring Bosnia meeting family and supporters of the man who was the military leader of the Bosnian Serbs. It's crisis time for the pornographers of Los Angeles: Ed Butler's been discovering that their customers are no longer keen to pay for the product. Picturesque Street in Moscow isn't as lovely as it sounds, according to our man there Steve Rosenberg; but it does have a tale to tell about Russia itself. And why does the sight of a foreigner riding a bike make Cambodians laugh? Guy Delauney, a keen cyclist and resident of the capital Phnom Penh, is well placed to provide an answer to that one!

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  • May 28, 2011

    Sat, 28 May 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Fin de Siecle Deauville hosts the G8 summit of world leaders where there have been clear signs of a different world order emerging -- Bridget Kendall's been taking note. Andrew Harding tells us what it's like in Misrata which endured a two month seige by Libyan forces loyal to Colonel Gaddafi; Conor Woodman is in a town in Laos which has been taken over by Chinese investment; there's a picnic under the palms in Algiers for Chloe Arnold as she charts the decline of the city's Russian community and Tim Ecott paints a portrait of the Faroe Islands out in the north Atlantic, a place where men are hardy, the sheep hardier and where there might just be puffin on the lunch menu!

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  • May 26, 2011

    Thu, 26 May 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The Roman Catholic Church is accused of running a dirty campaign as the people of Malta prepare to vote in a referendum on divorce. Jake Wallis Simons has been gauging the mood in and around the capital, Valletta; Anna Cavell, who's in Kampala, Uganda, tells us how the continuing series of protests is heaping pressure on the long-standing president Yoweri Museveni; Bhutan, the Himalayan mountain kingdom, is a place said to be more interested in Gross National Happiness than Gross Domestic Product! Mark Tully's been talking to the prime minister there about whether this is the most profitable way for the country to move forward; the war in Sri Lanka may now finally be at an end but Peter Meanwell, who's been there making a music programme for Radio 3, says its legacy can still be seen throughout the north ... and as Europe prepares for its biggest football match of the year, Pascale Harter tells us why the fans of FC Barcelona believe it's a club with a difference!

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  • May 21, 2010

    Sat, 21 May 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The carrots and sticks which the authorities in Saudi Arabia hope will persuade their people that protest is not a sensible option -- Michael Buchanan is gauging opinion in the desert kingdom. Who'll be the next president of Russia - Putin, Medvedev or someone else? It's a question preoccupying correspondents in Russia, among them the BBC's man Steve Rosenberg. As nuclear power plants around the world check their safety procedures after the apparent meltdown in Japan in March, Nick Thorpe visits a power station on the River Danube in Romania. The American president's on his way to Ireland but Kieran Cooke's been finding out that thousands of Irish, prompted by a tottering economy, are preparing to emigrate. And Kevin Connolly visits the casbah in Algers walking, he assures us, in the footsteps of Tarzan of the Apes.

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  • May 14, 2011

    Sat, 14 May 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Assisted suicide: as the people of Zurich in Switzerland prepare to vote on the issue, Imogen Foulkes tells a moving story about a couple who believed they had a right to decide on a date for death. Fergal Keane considers the historical significance of the forthcoming visit, by Queen Elizabeth 2, to the Republic of Ireland. Andrew Harding is in the Libyan rebel stronghold of Benghazi where, he says, people are determined to continue their fight against Colonel Gaddafi and to emerge with their country still united. Matthew Teller visits the city of Taif in Saudi Arabia, a place where many Saudi people spend their holidays while James Painter's in Peru asking questions about the freshwater Amazon dolphin including: why is it pink?

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  • May 7, 2011

    Sat, 7 May 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Weeks of violent confrontation in Uganda: Will Ross is in Kampala where lawyers are the latest group to protest against the regime of President Museveni. Mishal Husain is in the Pakistani town of Abottabad, where the life of Osama bin Laden, the world's most wanted man, was brought to an end last Sunday. Mishal talks of the new interest in this location which she remembers as a place her family went on holiday. President Obama was at Ground Zero this week and coincidentally, a little earlier, our correspondent Paul Adams was there with his two young sons who had awkward questions to ask about that day when the Twin Towers came crashing down. There's a new predator in the Caribbean -- the Lionfish. Tim Ecott's been to the Cayman Islands to get an idea of the scale of the problem it's brought with it. And Jonathan Fryer waits and waits for the night bus to Bolivia. But at least he has some company in the shape of a large, and affectionate, wild pig!

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  • April 30, 2011

    Sat, 30 Apr 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    A very French murder story: Hugh Schofield tells how France has been transfixed by an appalling human drama -- the killing of a mother, three sons and a daughter. Owen Bennett Jones questions whether depicting the news from Syria as 'brutal suppression of peaceful protestors' might be, to some extent, misleading. A climate of fear is stifling discussion about Pakistan's controversial blasphemy laws -- that's the contention of the BBC's Jill McGivering who's been touring the country investigating. Richard Wilson makes a return trip to Antarctica and is shocked at how the continent's changing. Gareth Armstrong visits an Indian classroom and hears the students voice outrage at how the British regard the work of the children's author Enid Blyton.

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  • April 23, 2011

    Sat, 23 Apr 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Students aren't revolting in Qatar and Oman -- Robin Lustig's been to the Gulf states to see what effect the uprisings in parts of the Arab world are having there. Justin Marozzi's in Libya as questions are being asked about who will run the country in the future. More journalists lost their lives this week in the fighting in Libya. Stuart Hughes reflects on the dangers a reporter can face covering conflict. Ethiopia is one of the least urbanised countries in the world; it's also a place which is losing its doctors - many of them are leave the country to work elsewhere. Claudia Hammond's been talking to some of the young people there who've now been charged with taking healthcare out into the wideopen spaces of the Ethiopian countryside. And why is it city dwellers in France are happy to live in apartments while their counterparts in the UK opt, where possible, for houses? Hugh Schofield in France wonders what this division tells us about the development of two neighbouring peoples.

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  • April 16, 2011

    Sat, 16 Apr 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    'The Bahrain I had known wasn't there' - Frank Gardner, who used to live on the Gulf island, reports on life there under a state of emergency. The 7/7 bombings in London claimed victims of many nationalities; Nick Beake has travelled to Poland to hear more about one of them: a young woman who was a keen student and a member of the local choir. India's huge population has come under scrutiny in the recent census and Mark Tully has been wondering if the country's relatively youthful population will ultimately prove a boon for the economy -- or a drain on it. A long running strike at the Detroit Symphony Orchestra has finally come to an end and Petroc Trelawny's been hearing that it could be a long time before the wounds are healed. And Kathy Flower finds that chemists' shops in the French Pyrenees offer much more than just aspirins - they're places you can visit for advice on wild mushrooms: will they kill you or prove a tasty topping on your omelette?

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  • April 09, 2011

    Sat, 9 Apr 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    'Even the winners are losers'-- Andrew Harding goes on a road journey through devastated, terrified Ivory Coast; Robert Hodierne on the homes being built for limbless former combat troops in the United States; Stephen Sackur's in the Australian outback hearing how the Chinese are getting iron ore there; the dangers of childbirth in Afghanistan and the efforts being made to improve the situation are explained by Nadene Ghouri in Kabul while Nick Thorpe hears tales about the ancient sturgeon and how it's facing extinction on the River Danube.

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  • April 2, 2011

    Sat, 2 Apr 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Visiting time at Yemen's jail for political prisoners: Genevieve Bicknell meets the families of some of those detained who tell her why they feel it's time for the country's president to step down. Mark Urban, just back from Afghanistan, talks of a new attempt to improve the tarnished image of Afghanistan's police force. How the Lost Boys, who fled the civil war in Sudan, are finding out details of their past thanks to an archive which had been gathering dust in Addis Ababa -- that's from Paul Adams. Linda Pressley travels deep into the forests of Ecuador to find out how oil exploration is threatening a way of life. Anu Anand is in Delhi where traditional story-tellers have been tempting people away from their flatscreen TVs. And Owen Bennett Jones is in Cairo wondering if he's just been ripped off by a canny taxi driver.

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  • March 26, 2011

    Sat, 26 Mar 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Crisis in the Eurozone -- Chris Morris in Brussels says we're ignoring it at our peril. Sue Lloyd Roberts hears two opinions about Saudi Arabia: do its women live pampered lives or are they kept prisoners? Nick Thorpe's in a village in eastern Hungary where vigilantes say Roma crime is raging out of control. Crazy names for serious people in the Philippines, Kate McGeown investigates. And Gabriel Gatehouse is in The Netherlands trying to ask the Royal Family if they still ride about on bicycles.

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  • March 19, 2011

    Sat, 19 Mar 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Explosions and gunfire in Benghazi -- Kevin Connolly on the struggle for power in eastern Libya; Rupert Wingfield Hayes is in Tokyo where there's growing fear at the prospect of nuclear meltdown. Hannah Barnes has been talking to lovers of Hebrew who are determined to ensure that the language remains as up to date as it can possibly be. Two months after a Congresswoman was shot in Tucson, Arizona, David Willis looks at the impact the incident had had on America's attitude towards guns. And Monhammed Hanif has been touched by the miseries of a splendid snow leopard which has been removed from its home among the craggy peaks of Pakistan.

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  • March 17, 2011

    Thu, 17 Mar 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Colossal forces of nature have devastated Japan and the country faces the possibility of a nuclear disaster; but in the teeth of catastrophe Rachel Harvey discovers an extraordinary resilience on the part of the Japanese people. Egypt is undergoing massive political upheaval; and while the country is struggling to shape its future, Christine Finn hears that looters are increasingly plundering its past. Southern Sudan is just a few months away from independence; Hugh Sykes gets a feel for life in what will be Africa's newest capital city. On the anniversary of Italy's unification, David Willey meets the Italians who would rather dismantle the state than celebrate its foundation. And, enjoying a rare glimpse of Russia's pioneering spacecraft, Richard Hollingham wonders whether Russia might prove to be the real winner of the space race.

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  • March 12, 2011

    Sat, 12 Mar 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Earthquake in Japan: Hugh Levinson on how fear of catastrophe has helped shape the country's psyche; menace and bloodshed in Ivory Coast's largest city - Andrew Harding on the violence triggered by a dispute over the presidency. What impact has the foreign media had on the course of the uprisings in north Africa and the Middle East? It's a question confronted here by the BBC's World Affairs Editor John Simpson. In north-east India, Rupa Jha meets some of the women who've lost their husbands in a series of under-reported insurgencies and Martin Patience spends a morning being amazed at Mr Wu's robot factory in China.

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  • Mar 10, 2011

    Thu, 10 Mar 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Michael Buchanan goes behind the front lines in the rebel city of Benghazi in Libya and finds many are still giddy with delight at their new found freedom. John James has been watching the West African State of Ivory Coast descend into chaos over the bitterly disputed election. In Cuba, Polly Hope finds people are plunging into the once forbidden world of commerce with huge enthusiasm. Daniel Sandford gets to the heart of the matter in Ukraine, listening to the tales of a former government driver battling against corruption. And Jonny Hogg spends time with a group of musicians who are attempting to play their way out of poverty in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

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  • March 5, 2011

    Sat, 5 Mar 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Dreams of a new Libya in the revolutionary city of Benghazi but, as Kevin Connolly's been discovering, there's fear too. Could Saudi Arabia be touched by this season of revolt in the Middle East? It's a question answered by a correspondent who knows the kingdom better than most, Frank Gardner. In a court in Belarus, David Stern looks on as KGB evidence condemns a pro-democracy activist. Judy Swallow chronicles the life of a hand-rickshaw puller in the Indian city of Kolkata and on a hunting trip in the Amazon, Justin Rowlatt finds himself wearing not much more than a string of feathers....and a smile.

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  • Mar 03, 2011

    Thu, 3 Mar 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    A restaurant date with Colonel Gaddafi: Jeremy Bowen talks revolution and politics with the Libyan leader. Chris Hogg in Shanghai -- is an Arab-style political spring likely to blossom in China? Steve Evans is in Berlin explaining the fall from grace of the government minister they're calling Dr Cut and Paste. Ethiopia's Christians celebrate their ancient sacred heritage, as Michael Kaye looks on. And flip flops - but not as we know them: Jane Beresford on another correspondent's dilemma.

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  • Feb 26, 2011

    Sat, 26 Feb 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Our correspondent - who can't be named - describes life in Tripoli with its empty streets, boarded up shops and burnt out buildings. Barbara Plett describes the strange goings on at the United Nations with Libya's diplomats divided over support for Colonel Gaddaffi's regime. Mark Mardell witnesses the conflicting emotions in Washington over the upheaval in the Middle East and asks why it seems that the United States so often backs the bad guys? Jonty Bloom explores the linguistic divide behind the political impass in Belgium. And Mark Lowen reports on the end of the BBC's Serbian Service after more than seventy years of broadcasting.

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  • Feb 24, 2011

    Thu, 24 Feb 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The Black Sea resort of Sochi is preparing to host the next Winter Olympics. But following an attack on tourists at a Russian ski resort, Stephen Rosenberg hears concerns that Sochi could become a target for terrorism. As the people of Dresden commemorate the anniversary of the city's bombing during World War Two, Stephen Evans meets the neo-Nazi's demonstrating there. Petroc Trelawney is treated to a day out in the Zimbabwean countryside and a history lesson from the daughter of the country's former Prime Minister. Jonathan Fryer meets the Mennonites of Paraguay, members of a Christian religious sect that set up home in the vast "green desert" of the Paraguayan Chaco. And Paul Miles takes part in the World Kick-sledge Championships where the sledges are propelled by people.

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  • Feb 19, 2011

    Sat, 19 Feb 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The unrest sweeping north Africa and the Middle East reaches Bahrain and Bill Law explains some of the tension in this island kingdom. Paul Adams travels through Egypt to see if calm is returning after the recent disturbances. As a momentous election approaches in Ireland, Fergal Keane says there's a sense of betrayal among the electorate. Robin Lustig travels through Italy in the week its prime minister is told he's facing serious criminal charges and Martin Plaut is in Sudan as the country prepares to split in two. There's a large unresolved question: what will happen to the cattle?

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  • Feb 17, 2011

    Thu, 17 Feb 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The wind of change sweeps across parts of the Middle East and North Africa -- an assessment from Jeremy Bowen. Basque separatist group ETA announced last year they would no longer use violence to campaign for the region's independence; Sarah Rainsford watches a new political party launch in Spain. Will Ross follows the first elections in Uganda since the end of war in the north of the country. Indonesia hopes to ride the wave of economic growth in the developing world and become the next big emerging market; Peter Day meets the Indonesians hoping for economic change; that their country might become the next Asian Tiger. And Trish Flanagan takes a trip along Ireland's rural roads to see the sport that stops the traffic.

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  • Feb 12, 2010

    Sat, 12 Feb 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Weeks of drama in Egypt reach a climax with the resignation of President Mubarak. Hugh Sykes tells of the joy in Cairo's Tahrir Square; Rupert Wingfield Hayes examines what will happen to the army of police, thugs and torturers who enforced Mubarak's police state; Jonathan Marcus explains how western diplomats were left floundering by this very Egyptian revolution; Sarah Monaghan's in Oman, a distant outpost of the Arab world waiting to see if the winds of change will blow through there as well and Justin Webb muses on the effect the changing shape of the Middle East might be having on American foreign policy.

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  • Feb 10 2011

    Thu, 10 Feb 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The generals in Cairo watch and wait as the demonstrations continue: Jon Leyne considers their possible role in the days and weeks ahead. Bethany Bell attends a spectacular Viennese ball and finds that the possible succession in Egypt is the talk of the town. Across Europe there is growing anxiety about the cultural impact of immigration, fuelling the growth of populist political parties who say Europe's Christian heritage is under threat. Chris Bowlby reflects on the religious symbolism of the immigration debate. A group of prominent Indians recently praised the country's media for exposing corruption. Mark Tully considers whether India's media is itself a part of the problem. And the Russian woman whose baby workout shocked the blogosphere has some advice for her critics.

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  • Feb 5, 2011

    Sat, 5 Feb 11

    Duration:
    28 mins

    With Egypt in turmoil Kevin Connolly discovers what Hosni Mubarak's sense of timing says about his character. Malcolm Brabant has been finding out how the dreams of migrants die on the streets of Athens. Why a Chinese chicken farmer is ruffling feathers in a Zambian market -- Justin Rowlatt's been investigating. In the southwest of France Chris Bockman's unearthed skullduggery among truffle hunters and their dogs. And Hamilton Wende's been to meet the bare-knuckle brawlers who fight for honour and glory in rural South Africa.

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  • 03 Feb 2011

    Thu, 3 Feb 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    President Mubarak of Egypt is desperate to leave office with a degree of dignity, but Lyse Doucet meets people in Cairo who think the time for change is now. US-led forces in Afghanistan feel they are making progress; Robert Fox considers whether this might be the beginning of the end for the Taliban or just another lull in the fighting. Few countries are as homophobic as Uganda; homosexual acts can be punished with years in prison. But following the death of gay rights activist David Kato, Anna Cavell finds Kampala's gay community in defiant mood. Pripyat in the Ukraine is a ghost town, abandoned within hours of the disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power-plant in 1986; Richard Hollingham explores the ruins of a model Soviet settlement frozen in time. Tea is a popular brew in both Britain and India but it's really not the same drink at all. Indian chai is something of a surprise to taste buds accustomed to the less spicy English preparation, but Judy Swallow soon fell in love with it.

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  • Jan 29, 2011

    Sat, 29 Jan 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Spectacular political developments across the Arab world as viewed from the Corniche in Beirut by Kevin Connolly; Quentin Somerville in Kabul views shocking evidence of what the Taleban call justice; Madeleine Morris is in the Indian state of Andrha Pradesh finding out why microcredit, once hailed as the answer to world poverty, has been getting a bad name; James Coomarasamy explores a town in Belarus where the spirit of Lenin still marches on and David Goldblatt is in Dakar getting a crash course in how to get streetwise in Senegal. And a correspondent goes in the footsteps of a master as he learns how to survive on the streets of Dakar....

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  • Jan 27, 2011

    Thu, 27 Jan 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The rampant corruption that blights India's dreams of a brighter future is chronicled by Chris Morris. Justin Marozzi is on the frontline of one of the most dangerous cities on earth. Sarah Monaghan is in once-thriving Dubai, the emirate learning to live with much harder economic times. David Willis has been hearing about the debt Las Vegas owes to the mafia.

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  • Jan 22, 2011

    Sat, 22 Jan 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Is China's economic muscle crushing the heart out of blue-collar America? Justin Rowlatt's been to Ohio to find out. But while America's industrial heartland's feeling the pinch, Mike Wendling finds that, in the social networking industry, Americans lead the field; Mary Harper tells us about the city in the Horn of Africa which has risen from the ruins of war; the story of an extraordinary Englishman who's immersed himself in Afghan tribal life is told by Nadene Ghouri; while Christian Parkinson makes a very important purchase in South Africa -- with a herd of cows!

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  • Jan 20, 2011

    Thu, 20 Jan 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    As the political crisis in Lebanon deepens, Jeremy Bowen explores the country's tangled politics and finds out why intrigue surrounding the assassination of former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri five years ago is driving events today. Adam Mynott was in Tunisia as President Ben Ali surrendered power. He assesses the mood on the streets and reflects on the difficulty of reporting a revolution. In Vietnam, Alastair Leithead finds a booming economy and an appetite for western goods challenging the country's communist traditions. Christian Fraser visits the school outside Paris that has opened in the former barracks of the Hussars; with fencing and horse-riding on the curriculum, can a traditional education offer something new to France's frustrated teens? And in Moscow, Steve Rosenberg hears a history of modern Russia from a cleaning lady who has lived through it all.

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  • Jan 15, 2011

    Sat, 15 Jan 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Violence on the streets of north Africa -- Chloe Arnold in Algeria says it's not only been a problem for the authorities in Tunisia. Southern Sudan's farmers have been talking to Will Ross about their dreams of peace in a new nation; the Communists of Laos begin a journey down the path to capitalism - Claudia Hammond had time to give an elephant a wash and brush up as she learned more; why some Americans are captivated by the British royal family -- Laura Trevelyan travelled to Grand Rapids, Michigan, in search of an answer; and Clive Lawton was soaking up the atmosphere on a holy day in an ancient centre of Jewish mysticism.

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  • Jan 8, 2011

    Sat, 8 Jan 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The assassin who was garlanded: Orla Guerin on murder on the streets of Islamabad and the extent of extremism in Pakistan. Mark Doyle returns to his old stamping ground in Ivory Coast and visits the hotel that once gave pony rides to his son and now is a sanctuary and a presidential office at the same. Jonathan Fryer is in Azerbaijan looking at the city of Baku: crossroads between east and west; Justin Rowlatt is investigating Chinese economic activity in Brazil while Tim Ecott’s at the remote Indian Ocean island that brings together some scientists, a hundred thousand turtles and the occasional stranded Somali pirate.

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  • Jan 1, 2011

    Sat, 1 Jan 11

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Nineteen correspondents from around the world join Kate Adie in this special New Year edition of the programme. They consider such matters as the 'park and pray' facilities on German's motorways, a reporter's dilemma on encountering a baby close to death in Pakistan; a cinema in Kabul where people gather to try to forget their troubles, a club in Baghdad where time seems to stand still, a school in Kenya where the alphabet is spelled out in goat droppings, several harrowing episodes at our correspondents' dining tables, an eventful rail journey in Zimbabwe and another on an Indian train with a strange choice of name, buying a drink in an iconic Irish pub and whether French can ever be the language of rock.

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  • Dec 18, 2010

    Sat, 18 Dec 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Three years in America: Kevin Connolly has time to reflect as he prepares to leave an eventful posting in the United States. A cocaine factory is blown to pieces in a Colombian jungle clearing -- Frank Gardner was there watching as the security forces took their battle against the cocaine barons into the jungle. Gideon Long, our man in Santiago, on Chile's extraordinary, rollercoaster year. The Roman Catholic Cathedral in Algiers has just re-opened -- Chloe Arnold was at the inauguration where she she saw Muslims and Christians praying alongside each other.

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  • Dec 11, 2010

    Sat, 11 Dec 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Can America's dollars buy hearts and minds in southern Afghanistan? It's a subject Michael Buchanan has been examining in Helmand province; Hugh Sykes has been finding out how some Palestinians and Israelis have been forging connections across their deep divide. In Chennai, formerly Madras, Peter Curran has been listening in to an argument about the use of the English language; the best and the worst of life in one of South Africa's toughest townships -- Karen Allen's been visiting Gugulethu and Hugh Schofield has been on the hunt for the wild raiders who've been tormenting farmers in France.

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  • Dec 4, 2010

    Sat, 4 Dec 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The great silence that is the legacy of genocide -- Neil Trevithick considers the legacy of brutality in Cambodia; Andrew Harding manages to relax on the beach in war-weary Mogadishu and finds some Somalians optimistic about the future; Paul Adams eats oysters for breakfast and talks to some of those living with the aftermath of the Gulf of Mexico's oil spill disaster. With much of the opposition boycotting the second round of general election voting, Jon Leyne considers the nature of politics Egyptian-style and Pascale Harter's learning how to endure endless thirst in one of the hottest places on the planet.

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  • Nov 27, 2010

    Sat, 27 Nov 10

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Why Pakistan's flood victims feel they've been let down by their rulers – Jill McGivering’s been investigating; Peter Day’s just back from China with the story of a victim of the Cultural Revolution who emerged from prison and made a fortune. Russia's policemen fail to see the funny side of a campaign of ridicule as we discover from a despatch by Lucy Ash. Justin Marozzi mingles with the crowds at a football tournament being held, controversially, in Yemen while Barbara Plett is in New York with a tale of shame and horror at a BBC office there.

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  • Nov 20 2010

    Sat, 20 Nov 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Ireland prepares to say goodbye to the best and brightest of its youth – Gavin Hewitt’s been finding out how the economic crisis there has forced thousands to consider emigration; Mark Urban’s at the NATO summit in Lisbon and points out that while some of the delegates question the continuing role of the alliance others believe fervently it has a role to play in the 21st century; in Rome David Willey says the rising tide of scandal may finally engulf Italy’s embattled prime minister; Paul Moss goes on patrol with the peacekeepers who have the challenging task of trying to maintain order in the Democratic Republic of Congo; while deep in the Amazon jungle, Justin Rowlatt finds himself confronting the jungle snack he’ll never forget …

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  • November 13, 2010

    Sat, 13 Nov 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    A dark portrait is painted by our correspondent Rupert Wingfield-Hayes of millions of Russian lives lost in alcohol and despair; there are reflections on the death of a deeply troubled German hero from Eleanor Oldroyd; Will Ross explores the divisions that may be just about to split Sudan in half; A Chinese gourmet is introduced to fine Italian food by Fuchsia Dunlop in Turin and we know that the super spy, James Bond didn't like the Cold War Russians....but what, Kevin Connolly wonders, did he make of the Americans?

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  • BBC Radio 4, 11 Nov 2010

    Thu, 11 Nov 10

    Duration:
    27 mins

    Christian families are leaving Iraq in large numbers amid continuing sectarian violence, Jim Muir has the latest developments. John Humphrys travels to China and finds political perils threaten the country's booming economy. In South Africa, Hamilton Wende hears tales of horror and victory from a veteran of the Battle of El Alamein. Lina Sinjab finds youngsters in Yemen disturbed by the way the world views their country. And in the Maldives, Tim Ecott witnesses the massing of the manta rays.

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  • Nov 4, 2010

    Thu, 4 Nov 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    An undercover exploration of the glittering new capital city built by Burma's generals is carried out by Sue Lloyd-Roberts; Damian Grammaticas looks at the population count in China that will shed light on more than a billion lives; Daniel Schweimler finds a vacuum in Argentina after the death of former president Nestor Kirchner; anger and fear in Indonesia's restless province of Papua is reported by Rachel Harvey; while in a forest in the Czech Republic, Mike Wendling taps into the local passion for sausages, cold beer and a game that you may well have never heard of.....

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  • 30 Oct 2010

    Sat, 30 Oct 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The ruined heart of an American city, laid waste by economic collapse, is explored by Paul Mason; Mary Harper visits a hotel in Nairobi that's become a little piece of Somalia; from a South African prison, Hamilton Wende tells an inspiring tale of guilt and redemption; there's an explosion in modern art in the Turkish city of Istanbul, but Rosie Goldsmith's been finding out that not everyone's happy with that. And our correspondent David Willis struggles to embrace America's passion for Halloween.

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  • Oct 28 2010

    Thu, 28 Oct 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Extra police have been drafted in to the Swedish city of Malmo -- Tim Mansel, who's there, says a gunman is on the loose who seems to have immigrants in his sights. The Chinese villages condemned to drown beneath the rising waters of the Yangtze - Peter Day's been to investigate. In the US, Andy Gallacher has a story of blood and guts at a rodeo in one of the country's toughest prisons. And Hugh Schfield tells us that while French may be the language of love and cuisine....it may not be right for rock and roll.

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  • BBC Radio 4, 23 Oct 2010

    Sat, 23 Oct 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Today: We hear French lessons for an American truck driver; the surprising story of why some schools in Japan are funded by the North Koreans; there are the explicit stories told to get the Aids message across to Ugandan children; and we learn how a 21st Century St. Patrick could help out with Ireland's economic woes.

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  • BBC Radio 4, 21 Oct 2010

    Thu, 21 Oct 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Today: we hear from Aleem Maqbool in Pakistan where it's easier to blame others for your troubles than to really face up to them; we're in Berber country, in Algeria, with Jonathan Fryer, where until recently kidnappings and killings were commonplace; we visit the Liberian countryside with Chris Simpson where they are dreaming of the good ol' days when some people had a monthly salary; in Okinawa Philippa Fogarty explains how some people are determined to preserve their culture, as distinct from the Japanese one; and our correspondent Jonah Fisher is in the burning Kalahari, with his charcoal pickles.

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  • 16 Oct 2010

    Sat, 16 Oct 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    A huge welcome -- from some at least --as the President of Iran comes to southern Lebanon, Jeremy Bowen was there watching. Humphrey Hawksley's in Kiev as Ukrainians look nostalgically back to the days when they were part of the Soviet empire; a mixed press for the Commonwealth Games but Sam Miller finds there are technological reasons to be cheerful; Joanna Jolly's in Nepal where the world's tiniest man reckons his height is a passport to financial security. And Nick Thorpe tells tales of tragedy and hope after a week spent on the road covering the story of toxic sludge leak in Hungary.

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  • BBC Radio 4, 14 Oct 2010

    Thu, 14 Oct 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    The Colombian fighters who've given up the struggle, opting for education instead -- Robin Lustig has been to meet them; Gideon Long in Chile on what the rescue at the Copiapo mine tells us about the Chilean character; a flowering of democracy in Kyrgyzstan, but Rayhan Demytrie finds it's all too complicated for some; Chris Hogg's in Pyongyang as President Kim Jong Il annoints his son as successor and Jennifer Pak discovers even the heat can't melt the enthusiasm for ice hockey in Malaysia.

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  • BBC Radio 4, 7 Oct 2010

    Tue, 12 Oct 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    A mesmerising speech from a great South African churchman: the retirement of Archbishop Tutu is marked by Allan Little; Ian Pannell on the increasingly unsafe roads of Afghanistan; Farhana Dawood is in Leipzig noting the continuing divisions between Germans from the east and west of the country; Martin Patience tells us how the Chinese government is having to consider the implications of an ever-older population while Christine Finn is in the Northern Irish fishing village of Ardglass tasting one of the "silver darlings" on which the port has built its reputation.

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  • BBC Radio 4, 9 Oct 2010

    Sat, 9 Oct 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Why some pro-democracy candidates in Burma won't be contesting the forthcoming elections; Pascale Harter's in Spain examining worries about the economy and the changes which a wave of immigration has brought to Spanish culture; In Srinagar, Kashmir, Chris Morris finds that local journalists, trying to report on a wave of unrest, have become targets themselves; Mark Mardell's in Nevada examining the reasons for the electorate's febrile mood ahead of November's midterm elections and a story about grandmother's chest of drawers and a mountain of red tape. That one's told by Chloe Arnold in Algiers.

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  • BBC Radio 4, 2 Oct 2010

    Sat, 2 Oct 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Who says the Germans don't have a sense of humour? Steve Evans is in the east of the country as the anniversary of reunification approaches. Baghdad once had dozens of cinemas playing to full houses and even hosting glittering premieres. Gabriel Gatehouse discovers why the cinema in Iraq is dying. Hamilton Wende in Johannesburg explores one consequence of the biggest influx of immigrants since the gold rush: a babble of new languages on the streets of this South African city. Kevin Connolly looks at the challenges facing President Obama in the run-up to the Midterm elections while Justin Rowlatt finds that a song from our own correspondent can break the ice in Angola.

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  • BBC Radio 4, 30 Sept 2010

    Thu, 30 Sep 10

    Duration:
    28 mins

    After years of conflict in Uganda, the people of Acholiland are returning home; but Richard Dowden finds memories of war are straining the Acholi tradition of forgiveness. Peter Marshall meets the British woman on death row in Texas, and considers whether she should be there. Martin Patience goes for a drive with the young people of China in search of new friends on the open road. Charles Haviland is in Sri Lanka, where people are sharing their memories of the long civil war. And a man with a shopping trolley attracts the attention of our man in Johannesburg, Andrew Harding.

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  • BBC Radio 4, 25 Sept 2010

    Sat, 25 Sep 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    A corner of old Germany is unearthed in Latin America as Will Grant follows Venezuelans preparing for a crucial vote. Jonathan Head travels to the east of Turkey where there’s been, according to the government, a gesture of reconciliation towards an Armenian minority, subjected to mass killing during the First World War. Fifty years on from independence in Nigeria, Anna Horsbrugh-Porter meets up with two men working there back in 1960. Paul Harper’s in a Yemeni town which comes to a standstill after lunch as its men grow euphoric, chewing the leaves of the qat plant. And why are numbers so sharply down at the Liberace Museum in Las Vegas? Kevin Connolly muses on the attractions of conspicuous consumption in a time of recession and the transience of fame.

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  • BBC Radio 4, 23 Sept 2010

    Thu, 23 Sep 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Why is China restoring a British railway in Angola? Justin Rowlatt boards the Benguela Railway. A new generation is shaping the future of Afghanistan: Lyse Doucet finds out how. Just back in Russia, Steve Rosenberg considers the country's future. Annie Caulfield visits a Kenyan reptile sanctuary and discovers the role snakes play in the environment. And Christopher Landau explains why he's giving up journalism to pursue a more spiritual vocation.

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  • BBC Radio 4, 18 Sept 2010

    Sat, 18 Sep 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Why are America's new breed of soldiers studying philosophy? David Edmonds is in New York state finding out. Jon Leyne has been monitoring speculation in Cairo about who will succeed President Mubarak. There's a significant diplomatic development, Mark Lowen tells us from Belgrade, in Serbia's stance towards its breakaway province of Kosovo. Which are the countries who'll be having their say on world affairs in ten years'time? It's a question Bridget Kendall poses ahead of the UN General Assembly in New York. And some say it was Africa's biggest market. But Louise Redvers says the site, in Angola's capital, Luanda has been closed down and its traders moved on.

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  • BBC Radio 4, 16 Sept 2010

    Thu, 16 Sep 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    A big week for the Turkish Prime Minister. Jonathan Head gauges reaction to his growing power. Jennifer Pak finds out what sex education is like for teenagers in Malaysia. Angus Crawford meets the children of Senegal made to beg for money by their teachers. Lorraine Mallinder is in Mauritius finding out what happened to the Chagos Islanders exiled there. And Zeb Soanes goes to Hollywood and gets a shave from the barber to the stars.

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  • BBC Radio 4, 11 September 2010

    Sat, 11 Sep 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Will economics force the French to rethink their lifestyles? It's a question Christian Fraser in Paris answers in the week a million French people took to the streets to protest at the government's plans to raise the retirement age. On the anniversary of 9/11 Laura Trevelyan in New York's been talking to the Manhattan Muslims about the furore surrounding plans to build an Islamic cultural centre and mosque close to Ground Zero. Mark Tully visits a hill station -- it's the sort of place the British, back in colonial days, would go to escape the heat of summer. Today, it seems, they have a rather different character. Jane Beresford's in the fields of Sierra Leone finding out why women there welcome the sight of new tractors at their farms and Ella Fitzgerald sang of eating baloney at Coney. Today, as Antonia Quirke has discovered, the city has plans for the amusement district of Coney Island ... and not everyone's happy.

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  • BBC Radio 4, 4 Sept 2010

    Sat, 4 Sep 10

    Duration:
    29 mins

    There's a dilemma for Jill McGivering, covering the floods in Pakistan; Gabriel Gatehouse in Baghdad on the changing lexicon as America redefines its mission in Iraq; Wyre Davies is in Jerusalem and detects little optimism for the Middle East peace talks which have restarted in Washington; James Reynolds is at the mine in the Atacama Desert where 33 miners are trapped far undergound and Andy Kershaw visits the arena in Kinshasa which was the site of the world's greatest boxing encounter.

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