From Our Own Correspondent

From Our Own Correspondent

Insight, wit and analysis as BBC correspondents, journalists and writers take a closer look at the stories behind the headlines. Presented by Kate Adie. Broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in the UK on Thursdays at 1100 (local time) and Saturdays at 1130 (local time) for about 25 weeks of the year. BBC World Service broadcasts every day from Monday to Friday plus a weekend edition all year round, presented by Pascale Harter. For more information, a full list of programme broadcast times and the podcast Terms of Use go to www.bbc.co.uk/fromourowncorrespondent

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  • Episodes available:
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Recent episodes (10)

  • FOOC April 12 2014: A Happy Ending

    Sat, 12 Apr 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    The stories behind the stories. In this edition: why Germany's ambivalence towards Russia may emerge as east meets west to discuss Ukraine next week; West Bengal plans to restore the lost glory of Kolkata - the idea is, we hear, to make it a bit more like London; life gets harder in the Gaza Strip as the interim government in neighbouring Egypt cranks up the pressure on Hamas; 'Isn't that you know who?' A chance meeting, in a Budapest hospital, with the man who is arguably Europe's most controversial leader. And what happened when our man in Marrakech asked the king to step in to save an ancient tradition from oblivion.

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  • FOOC 05 April 2014: Underneath the Mango Tree

    Sat, 5 Apr 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Despatches from foreign correspondents. Today: Tim Whewell on what's caused the savage breakdown in law and order in the Central African Republic. As Afghans go to the polls, Lynne O'Donnell reflects on the daily threats they face from the Taliban. Ritula Shah in Gujarat on how there's cake for SOME Indians as their mammoth election approaches. Will Grant meets migrants in Mexico preparing for a dangerous and illegal desert trek into the United States and it's a literary mystery that's baffled the brilliant for more than a century - Simon Worrall's been to study the controversial Voynich Manuscript.

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  • FOOC March 29 2014: Are the Russians coming?

    Sat, 29 Mar 14

    Duration:
    25 mins

    Correspondents' stories. In this edition, Humphrey Hawksley's in a part of Europe where an increase in Russian influence would not be unwelcome. Twenty-five years after the fall of Communism, Monica Whitlock is in Romania where they are still unlocking secrets from the past. As election time approaches in India, Kieran Cooke's visiting Assam and finding remnants of a bygone, colonial era. And not far from high-tech Silicon Valley, Andrew Whitehead finds there's still enthusiasm for the old-style, printed book.

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  • FOOC 22nd March 2014: Hirsute History + Desert Verse

    Sat, 22 Mar 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kate Adie introduces correspondents' stories from around the world. Today, Jamie Coomarasamy meets the man who once was Crimea's one and only President and dreams of a new landscape; James Menendez goes to the city where month-long demonstrations started in Venezuela; Shahida Bari find camels, dogs, four by fours, twitter and verse in the deserts of the UAE; Rajan Datar is in Goa, trying his best to help pick up the rubbish; and Stephen Mulvey's memories of Ukrainian independence don't match President Putin's.

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  • FOOC 20th March 2014: Forensics and Scrummaging

    Thu, 20 Mar 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Correspondents' stories from around the world, introduced by Kate Adie. Today: Will Grant meets El Salvador's only forensic archaeologist, with the unenviable task of unearthing and identifying murder victims; Emma Jane Kirby is in a French border town, discovering why the Front National is gaining support; Karen Allen visits the former Taleban capital of Kandahar where businessmen are in desperate need of more power; Alex Preston, in Sri Lanka, finds out why rugby is becoming so popular; and Susannah Knights is with the musicians and performers of Tunisia who are poor but flourishing in their new found freedom.

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  • FOOC 15th March 2014: History, Aliens and Chicken Wings

    Sat, 15 Mar 14

    Duration:
    28 mins

    Kate Adie introduces correspondents' stories. This week Mark Lowen is reminded of his days in the Balkans as he talks about history to people in Crimea; three years after the start of the uprising in Syria, Lina Sinjab catches up with those who once had so much hope; Sue Lloyd Roberts hears how a religious sect that believes in Aliens and the pursuit of pleasure is trying to help victims of female genital mutilation in Burkina Faso; In Serbia, Guy de Launey tells us how a political double-act could be replaced by Superman; and Tara Isabella Burton explains why chickens should avoid the Wing Bowl in Philadelphia.

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  • FOOC 13th March 2014: Troubles in Paradise

    Thu, 13 Mar 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kate Adie introduces Correspondents' stories from around the world. Today Ukrainian journalist Andriy Kulykov wonders why silence is the order of the day with the armed men of Crimea. Peter Day is in industrious South Korea where they are trying to make the place more relaxed. Damien McGuinness visits a mega-brothel in Germany, where prostitution has been legal for over a decade, but he questions if much has really changed. We take a remarkly tourist-free ride down the Nile with Robin Denselow; it's good for him but not so good for Egypt. And Charlotte Ashton discovers why Singapore is at the bottom of the happy pile.

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  • FOOC March 08 2014: Courthouses and Codpieces

    Sat, 8 Mar 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Kate Adie introduces correspondents' stories from around the world. This week, with American and British combat troops soon to leave, the author and historian William Dalrymple gives his assessment of where the latest military intervention into Afghanistan fits into the country's troubled history. Quentin Sommerville attends the court hearing of some Al-Jazeera journalists in Egypt and finds the prosecution less than convincing. Linda Pressly is in Uruguay to see if legalising marijuana will help tackle the problem of hard drugs. In India, Ed Butler spends time with sleuths of a special kind - the wedding detectives. And Stephen Smith re-visits Italy's Renaissance with its ruffs, doublets and, of course, cod-pieces.

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  • FOOC 06 March 2014: spaceships in the desert

    Thu, 6 Mar 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    Stories from correspondents around the world, introduced by Kate Adie. In this programme Mark Urban hears an Iraqi policeman let rip about his own government and there are predictions of mayhem. In Afghanistan Chris Terrill visits a school that's daring to teach boys and girls together. Niger has joined the club of oil producers and Celeste Hicks describes how the arrival of a spaceship of sorts in the desert is affecting people's lives - but they need to read the small print. James Rodgers visits a World War 1 cemetery near Jerusalem and ponders how events there 100 years ago influenced the region and still do. And Justin Marozzi has been given a nickname - in Somalia. It's not flattering but it's better than the last one.

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  • FOOC March 01 2014: Revolutions are Unpredictable

    Sat, 1 Mar 14

    Duration:
    29 mins

    'When change happens, it can happen very, very fast,' Steve Rosenberg in Ukraine. Revolutions: no-one can be quite sure how they'll turn out, Kevin Connolly in Egypt. Bush fires in Australia: Jim Carey on what can be learned from the Aborigines, who spent tens of thousands of years controlling the land. The modern world is closing in on the Amish communities of the US, but Beth McLeod says they're not dying out. They are, in fact, thriving. And a conflict zone is not a place where the mentally ill thrive, as Mary Harper's been learning at a hospital in the Somali capital, Mogadishu.

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