Radio 3 Essay

Radio 3 Essay

Authored essays from leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond, themed across a week. Each episode is full of insight, opinion and intellectual surprise from one expert voice. The Essay is broadcast on BBC Radio 3 Monday to Friday 10.45pm. We aim to include as many episodes of The Essay in the podcast as we can but you'll find that some aren't included for rights reasons.

  • Updated:
  • Episodes available:
    Indefinitely help

Subscribe for free

Subscribe to this podcast and automatically receive the latest episodes.

More help with subscribing

Recent episodes (10)

  • Unsung Heroines of Classical Music - Mary Gladstone 5 March 15

    Thu, 5 Mar 15

    Duration:
    14 mins

    Dr Phyllis Weliver on Mary Gladstone, daughter of Prime Minister William Gladstone, who was a master of 'soft diplomacy' and brought music making to the heart of Downing Street

    Download 7MB (right click & "save target as / link as")

  • Unsung Heroines of Classical Music - Leopoldine Wittgenstein 4 March 15

    Wed, 4 Mar 15

    Duration:
    14 mins

    Vienna Correspondent Bethany Bell's reassessment of the life of salonniere Leopoldine Wittgenstein, wife and mother who put music at the heart of her illustrious but febrile family

    Download 7MB (right click & "save target as / link as")

  • Unsung Heroines of Classical Music - Lady Maud Warrender 3 March 15

    Tue, 3 Mar 15

    Duration:
    14 mins

    Kate Kennedy tells the story of Lady Maud Warrender. Aristocrat, lesbian, singer and influential patron of music, all her life she trod the line between respectability and scandal.

    Download 7MB (right click & "save target as / link as")

  • Unsung Heroines of Classical Music - Nadezhda von Meck 2 March 15

    Mon, 2 Mar 15

    Duration:
    14 mins

    Vanora Bennett tells the story of Tchaikovsky's reclusive benefactor, Nadezhda von Meck, who paid his bills for thirteen years on the condition that they never meet.

    Download 7MB (right click & "save target as / link as")

  • The Fear Itself - Raymond Tallis 27 Feb 15

    Fri, 27 Feb 15

    Duration:
    14 mins

    Raymond Tallis on how human fear is rooted in the distinctive nature of human rather than animal consciousness, and how it is often led by thought and imagination.

    Download 7MB (right click & "save target as / link as")

  • The Fear Itself - Temple Grandin 26 Feb 15

    Thu, 26 Feb 15

    Duration:
    14 mins

    Temple Grandin, diagnosed with autism in 1949 when aged two, has become a leading advocate for autistic people, and considers the role fear and anxiety plays in their condition.

    Download 7MB (right click & "save target as / link as")

  • The Fear Itself - Quentin Skinner 25 Feb 15

    Wed, 25 Feb 15

    Duration:
    14 mins

    Quentin Skinner on how 17th century British philosopher Thomas Hobbes came to believe that "fear and I were twin born", writing fear into the heart of his political philosophy.

    Download 7MB (right click & "save target as / link as")

  • The Fear Itself - Kier-La Janisse 24 Feb 15

    Tue, 24 Feb 15

    Duration:
    14 mins

    Kier-La Janisse reflects on how educational films like Dark and Lonely Water, The Finishing Line and Signal 30 have scared more children more deeply than any horror feature film.

    Download 7MB (right click & "save target as / link as")

  • The Fear Itself - Matthew Sweet 23 Feb 15

    Mon, 23 Feb 15

    Duration:
    14 mins

    Matthew Sweet reflects on The Little Albert Experiment, conducted by John B Watson, who conditioned a toddler to recoil from a white rat and, eventually, any white fluffy object.

    Download 7MB (right click & "save target as / link as")

  • The Five Photographs that Changed Everything 20 Feb 15

    Fri, 20 Feb 15

    Duration:
    14 mins

    You won't find this photograph in a glossy coffee table book. It's not art and the person who took it doesn't feature in the Photographers Hall of Fame. But this picture has had an enormous impact on our legal system. In 1866 a butcher sat for his photograph in the remote town of Wagga Wagga, Australia. Three years later this likeness had Britain transfixed. Jennifer Tucker tells the story of how it was central to the longest legal battle in 19th century England, and sparked a debate about evidence, the law, ethics and facial recognition that has continued ever since. Jennifer Tucker is Associate Professor of History and Science in Society at Wesleyan University, USA.

    Download 7MB (right click & "save target as / link as")

Terms of Use

The BBC Podcasts are for your personal non-commercial use only.

All title, ownership rights and intellectual property rights in and to the BBC Podcasts shall remain the property of the BBC or third parties. You may not edit, alter, adapt or add to the BBC Podcast in any way. The BBC Podcasts are made available by the BBC on an "as is" and "as available" basis and the BBC gives no warranty of any kind in relation to the BBC Podcast. To the maximum extent permitted by law the BBC will not be liable for any loss or damage which you may suffer as a result of, or connected to, the download or use of the BBC Podcasts.

 

See the full Standard Licence Terms here.

Play recent episodes

You may also like

Radio 3 Story of Music in Fifty Pieces

  • Entertainment
  • Music > Classical
  • Factual > Arts, Culture & the Media

Radio 3 Story of Music in 50 Pieces. Howard Goodall in conversation with Suzy Klein. 50 pieces of music that changed the course of music history. Duration likely to be around 6 minutes.

Fri, 1 Mar 13

4 minutes

UK only

Secret History of Social Networking

  • Factual
  • Factual > Arts, Culture & the Media

It's a phenomenon which seems to have come from nowhere, but in fact computer-based social networks have been around for decades. In this three-part series the BBC's technology correspondent Rory

Wed, 9 Feb 11

28 minutes