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January 2004
Review: One Third of a Picture
One Third of a Picture
One Third of a Picture


One Third of a Picture

Biserk Dance Company

The Pegasus Theatre

Fri 23 - Sat 24, January 2004

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By Jenny Enarsson

One third of a picture, Oxford based modern dance company Biserk's latest production incorporates dance, music and film to create an extraordinary performance in three parts.

In Odd positions, the group of dancers move as if they were different parts of the same organism, breathing and shifting as one, before breaking free from one another and heading away from the group.

In L'empreinte dans le Jardin, Biserk founders Sarah Bishop and Nickely Burke perform a tender and powerful pas de deux that showcases physical strength and audience contact as well as technical mastery.

The third offering, the title piece, is accompanied by footage projected on the background, music composed especially by Christian Alexander, and playground rhymes. Dressed in brightly coloured costumes reminiscent of 1950s swimsuits, the dancers efficiently set off their different characteristics.

One third of a picture is beautiful and moving with an ever-present edge. Under the immediately aesthetic surface there is a gnawing sense of unrest which makes the work all the more interesting.

The dancers glide in and out of sync with each other, bouncing energy off one another and irresistibly drawing the audience in. A lot of work is done with glances and eye contact between the dancers, adding an extra dimension to the space between them. These force fields hold an intensity that enhances the choreography every step of the way.

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