See Hear Talk  permalink

I think everybody

This discussion has been closed.

Messages: 1 - 17 of 17
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by ilovepink (U14315242) on Friday, 3rd June 2011

    with severe to stone deaf have speech problems. anybody says no not me you have you just dont know it .

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by M M (U14200747) on Sunday, 5th June 2011

    I'm deaf my speech is fine thanks, the only issue occasionally is volume, because I cannot hear background noises of any kind, so don't know when to raise or lower the level, but no problem with the clarity of it. I get caught out on shops or other public areas because I gather there is horrendous background noises from music being played, pubs, clubs, restaurants, where noise is classed as ambience ! and lots of people talking etc.

    The thing against electric cars is they DON'T make a noise so you get no warning they are coming, Japanese have invented an 'noise' so that we are aware an electric car is coming.

    Taxi drivers are my annoyance, I'd ban them using these blue tooth things in their ears, what ARE they supposed to be doing !!! having mobiles, or having radios on, because 70% of the time I cannot make myself heard above the noise in the cab. I'm told that mostly I pitch my voice at pretty much the same level as any hearing person.

    I was very aware that many deaf shout at people (!) and amongst themselves, what I did was very early on when I went deaf took considerable interest in people's reaction to my speech, most deaf with speech can do this, you watch to see if body language changes when you are loud, or basically if they ask you to speak up, trial and error means then I can pitch my voice at the levels required, it DOES mean you have to make an daily concious effort to 'remember' the level of volume mentally. It can be done. There is no need for any deaf who have viable speech to shout, with proper tuition.

    Background noise is the issue not our speech, we have no way of knowing what noise level that is.

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by ilovepink (U14315242) on Sunday, 5th June 2011

    you only think your speech is fine MM you cant hear it so you only think its ok . people are not going to tell you its not.

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by Daredevil (U14587881) on Sunday, 5th June 2011

    Must remember MM that you're not a person who was born entirely deaf and was lucky enough to acquire speech in a fairly normal manner, thus lending you a natural abilty to judge your speech level in most situations.

    I acquired my speech only when it was acknowledged I had a serious hearing loss and was fitted in the first instance a single hearing aid that was soon to become 2 and a series of six speech therapy sessions. I was five years of age at this point in time and my speech really took off from then onwards!

    It is thanks to my parents that I have near perfect speech despite the small fact that my hearing loss is over half what it was when I first wore aids! Lost all useful hearing in my right ear when I was 13 years old, what remains in my left ear is nowhere what it was back 45 years ago, if truth be told it might be even near half that.

    I do say that it is both a curse as well as a blessing that I can talk as an equal in any situation and no one is any the wiser just how 'deaf' I really am, but I can't in many of those situations keep up with free flowing conversation especially when in environments that are noisy, dark and poor lighting and with groups that number more than 1!

    Regarding your comments on knowing if you've pitched your voice at a level that isn't either too high or even too low, is a difficult one for born deaf, many can never relate to what you think they should be able to judge as what they can't hear they'll never know if it is at the right pitch. I know from many years with many people that are either deaf from birth or acquired and so on, it just doesn't happen. having said that there are plenty of 'normal' hearing people who speak loud too, or too quietly or even worse mumble ( mumbling is a real problem for us deaf I'll think you'll agree).

    Your comment, 'There is no need for any deaf who have viable speech to shout, with proper tuition' easier said than done as I stated above, I had just six sessions of speech therapy aged 5, so just who is going to spend hours with those who can't judge their speech levels till they get it right? Unlike me many people may not get the support from parents or family in assisting them in learning how to gauge their speech when out and about! Also speech therapist serve not only deaf but a whole spectrum of those requiring the need to get their speech corrected from the result of accidents, facial surgery, memory loss and so on.

    Interestingly there is another factor that can crop up with speech in a very different way, that is the offspring of 2 deaf/hoh parents requiring assistance to learn to speak properly, I have a mate where this happened the kids when they were growing up were found to be mimicking their fathers speech (he of the couple was the only one who spoke), and to prevent the kids from not speaking normally they had speech therapy to correct them, funny thing is the kids esp. the oldest lad corrects his father's speech now! And the father said to me that's my speech therapist! I asked the lad how did I fare and got the thumbs up and stated perfect and that was good enough for me!

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by ilovepink (U14315242) on Sunday, 5th June 2011

    i had to take my kids to speech therapy Daredevil

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by M M (U14200747) on Sunday, 5th June 2011

    So you have heard me speaking then ? I'm aware some people patronise and don't want to cause offence, but I am well aware when my voice is not up to it. My family e.g. would soon tell me if I was acting the deafie I can assure you ! From day one they ensured I didn't drift off to mumbling and and opting out, they saved me from deafness really to an large extent by NOT accepting that was the end to hearing communication. I am not allowed to use any sign language with my family at all, and haven't for 30 years, I have to speak or they don't communicate back, it's an great impetus to keep up speech. I am confident they would not say my speech was OK if it wasn't. They will say speak up or tone it down whatever... I don't see how the fact I had hearing at one point at all relevant, I still can't hear it.

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by M M (U14200747) on Sunday, 5th June 2011

    Speech therapists are rubbish they are anti-deaf mostly anyway... and I KNOW they are anti-sign. They were the primary opposition stating sign delays and hinders speech acquisition, they opposes BSL classes for deaf at adult level on that basis, and I agree to an large extent..... There should be speech therapy applied more to ALL deaf people who can speak, you CAN be trained to pitch it at right volumes, and it should be integrated with communication support too, I couldn't care less about the oralist jibes, as this only applies to deaf with some viable speech anyway, I doubt you can effectively teach born deaf, even if the possibility is there the political will is against. Acquired deaf are NOT at any advantage, it's a myth promoted by jealous born deaf but has no basis in fact, indeed signers have a lot more advantages in many respects... they do not have to deal with loss...

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by Daredevil (U14587881) on Sunday, 5th June 2011

    Speech therapists don't just serve deaf/hoh as you well know MM, as I stated there are many areas where they do much good, and no I haven't heard you speak MM but I based my comments upon the following that you wrote in the 2nd post to this thread -

    'I was very aware that many deaf shout at people (!) and amongst themselves, what I did was very early on when I went deaf took considerable interest in people's reaction to my speech, most deaf with speech can do this, you watch to see if body language changes when you are loud, or basically if they ask you to speak up, trial and error means then I can pitch my voice at the levels required, it DOES mean you have to make an daily conscious effort to 'remember' the level of volume mentally. It can be done. There is no need for any deaf who have viable speech to shout, with proper tuition.'

    Thus you had a time when you acquired speech in the normal way! But do feel free to correct me if I've interpreted it wrongly.

    But you are wrong regarding whether you can teach a born deaf to speak, I know many who at first glance you would assume by the very fact that they have excellent speech must have a lot of useful hearing, but when you learn that they are deaf as a post, pardon the pun, then you'd acknowledge it can be done, but it does require a very dedicated and persistent input to overcome the virtual inability to actually hear what one says themselves to achieve a very high standard of speech that doesn't suggest the person speaking has a profound degree of deafness!

    I know from the time I was issued with a very powerful aid for the ear in which I lost pretty much all my hearing, I just couldn't make out any thing said, let alone follow speech if it was all I had to rely on. I am in no a deafie as you term one with profound hearing loss nor am I a signer, but I do know some after being involved with deaf in way or another. But crucically as you say it is the nurturing you received within a family enviroment that has ensured you didnt fall into the trap of not keeping your speech pitchd at a level acceptable in polite society!

    Yes we are in a society that places a premium in communicating by speech and I guess in a way a speech therapist has been tought to encourage those with deafness to utilise any useful hearing to learn to speak.

    This I quote doesn't make sense 'Acquired deaf are NOT at any advantage,' at what aren't they at any disadvantage? I kow those who have acquired a hearing loss comparable to mine but tend to either speak rather loudly or too quietly, one saying that he talked loud when he had full hearing? But I suspect time has dulled his memory of what his voice was like when he could hear himself speak without having to wear an aid.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by M M (U14200747) on Sunday, 5th June 2011

    If you read the comment I made the differences clear regarding born and acquired deaf. The disadvantages of acquiring deafness are considerable, loss of family/friends, mental illness issues, no communication support, blind ignorance portrayed at the hand of deaf awareness, speech therapists do not work with born deaf, the list is pretty endless where we are more disadvantaged than born deaf who get support from birth on, have special education and support aimed at them, are provided with trained help and aware people, and have some community of sorts they can still belong to, and not prevented from communication inclusion as much as we are. So yeah you don't know what difficult is really regarding LOSS, which is the primary separator, given a choice who needs the most support I'd put my sector first, yes. Just because I learnt speech early on is an disadvantage when I lose hearing, sorry do NOT agree it can work AGAINST you both either the deaf sector who heap oralist carp on all and sundry, and mistaken belief from those with hearing speech equals hearing. Perhaps I should play dumb... I can't see why you are not only knocking born deaf should speak a bit, but suggesting we as acquired deaf are just fooling ourselves, let's have a bit of support ! I said at the start those WITH speech capability not those without. I I wanted support I'd never ask the deaf community for it ! One ignorant sector is enough to contend with.

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by ilovepink (U14315242) on Sunday, 5th June 2011

    its just as hard for people born with hearing loss as people who go deaf later. the communication problems still the same the isolation still the same . mental health problems that go with hearing loss still the same . people who go deaf later are no worse of than people born with hearing loss.

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by ilovepink (U14315242) on Sunday, 5th June 2011

    Its not just the talking loud or quiet either people with hearing loss dont pronuce words properly either.

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by tishcat (U14708219) on Sunday, 5th June 2011

    it goes without saying that i mispronounce some words. Mostly these are words or names that i'm not familiar with. Such as i can read the name of a footballer but without hearing that name pronounced am at a loss how to say it. The same goes for "newish" words such as DELI as in delicatessan or BAGUETTE the kind of bread.
    With these unfamiliar words the only way to know how to correctly pronounce them is to hear how they are meant to be said or learn phonetically.
    Embarrassing at times, but not a major problem and not totally confined to deaf people

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by M M (U14200747) on Monday, 6th June 2011

    its just as hard for people born with hearing loss as people who go deaf later. the communication problems still the same the isolation still the same . mental health problems that go with hearing loss still the same . people who go deaf later are no worse of than people born with hearing loss. 
    Yes we are, and there are more of us, acquired deaf power ! 'Deaf' have never had it so good...

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 13.

    Posted by ilovepink (U14315242) on Monday, 6th June 2011

    How do you know if you are worse of MM when you havent had hearing loss from birth

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by M M (U14200747) on Monday, 6th June 2011

    We're the new militant late-deafened, we are pushing because we have to... we have got nothing so nothing to lose by going for it....

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 15.

    Posted by ilovepink (U14315242) on Monday, 6th June 2011

    what are you pushing for. why dont you see if you can get a CI

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 16.

    Posted by M M (U14200747) on Monday, 6th June 2011

    If I could have got an CI or could benefit from it, I would have years ago smiley - smiley I'm holding out for genetic engineering now, at least the next generation won't have to put up with it then.... meanwhile we need to hone our sympathy card, it works for the rest.....

    Report message17

Back to top

About this Board

The Ouch! messageboard has now closed. Messages you have posted will remain archived.

or register to take part in a discussion.


The message board is currently closed for posting.

To continue the conversation visit Ouch's blog (bbc.co.uk/ouch) - now part of BBC News. There you'll find our podcast, regular blog entries and articles, community events, and links to where you can find us on Facebook and Twitter.

This messageboard is reactively moderated.

Find out more about this board's House Rules

Search this Board

Live community panel

Our blog is the main place to go for all things Ouch! Find info, comment, articles and great disability content on the web via us.

Mat and Liz
Listen to our regular razor sharp talk show online, or subscribe to it as a podcast. Spread the word: it's where disability and reality almost collide.

More from the BBC

BBC Sport

Disability Sport

All the latest news from the paralympics.

Peter White

In Touch

News and views for people who are blind or partially sighted.

BBC Radio 4

You & Yours

Weekdays 12.40pm. Radio 4's consumer affairs programme.

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.