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Big D Little d? Grow up,its 2011!

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Messages: 1 - 21 of 21
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by nativeson (U14540277) on Thursday, 26th May 2011

    How childish is the Big D/Little d debate? Maybe 25 years ago there was something in it, but now it is ridiculous. Technology has changed things.A lot of born deaf have cochlear implants now.Big D means deaf school....WHAT deaf schools now?! Nearly all have closed;its all mainstream now.Deaf clubs are dying because young prefer mainstream activity now-pubs clubs etc.
    I just watch the see hear programme on this issue.I couldn't believe this rubbish is still an issue. I was always against bigD because the people who support it are exactly like racists and have the same prejudices and small minds of people who look down on deaf. As I dont like racists or prejudice against me being deaf I could never side with them. To hear them still going on about it in 2011 is an absolute joke. Grow up!

    Report message1

  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by AndyfromCornwall (U14342750) on Thursday, 26th May 2011

    Who has been going on about it?
    I have always deplored the way in which some people try to draw a line through the deaf community. Some people can live their lives as full-time signers because they live in the right environment. Everyone else has to compromise, if they want to get on, that is.
    The Big D /Little d argument has always been about a small number of Deaf people making a lot of fuss. Lately they have gone a bit quiet so I thought maybe that was an end to it.
    It's silly. It belongs with "My football team is better than yours" and that's not how the real world works.
    More sinister is the way in which some people have tried to influence deaf forums by bullying them into silence. And they talk about "oppression". Ha!

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by M M (U14200747) on Thursday, 26th May 2011

    It's a dead issue except for the politically correct charitable blurbs who seem to be the last on the planet to understand nobody accepts either term, apart from a few die-hard deaf activists who see it as a way to promote culture as they see it. Why it is still debated is because 'deaf awareness' surely the biggest non-event in the UK insists on continuing to use these terms. We don't care about the definition, we don't want divisionist terminology, in short we don't WANT a Big D acceptance (They are only bragging anyway)....

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by Tim (U14258428) on Thursday, 26th May 2011

    Here's a great film by Charlie, which could almost be my autobiography! :

    www.youtube.com/watc...

    Maybe some healing is finally taking place.

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by AndyfromCornwall (U14342750) on Thursday, 26th May 2011

    That's very nice. It looks as if that particular group of deaf people are getting better and better at making films, they are improving with every film.
    I must say, there was never any chance of my parents ever using sign language. They regarded my deafness as something a bit curious and overprotected me like mad. I really had the worst parents, trust me. I could go on for hours.

    So my life really consisted of me trying to be me and not the person my parents were trying to make me! I was fortunate to go to Mary Hare because for all their faults I did learn a lot about morality and that sort of thing which saw me through some very difficult times. Even today I have such painful memories of those times that I don't like to dwell on them.
    My beef with Mary Hare is not that they were Oral but because they recognised the fact that I am well above average intelligence but they didn't realise that I am dyslexic! So I had a very tough time academically but I enjoyed being part of a deaf community at school.
    Going home for the holidays, I had to transform into a hearing person to keep my parents happy. If you made a film about my early life everyone would be in floods of tears...

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by gammati (U14550922) on Thursday, 26th May 2011

    I would be very surprised if Mary Hare staff could have identified that you were dyslexic in the 1960's. Despite being first identified in 1896, it was not until 1970 that it was officially recognised in the UK by Parliament. You could say you were born too soon!

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 6.

    Posted by AndyfromCornwall (U14342750) on Thursday, 26th May 2011

    Well you see, I couldn't do what they were asking me to do. They looked at the IQ tests and figured out that I ought to have a PhD at about 15 and they pushed me accordingly.
    Unfortunately when I didn't do as they wanted they chose to see it as non-cooperation and treated me accordingly. That's what it was all about.

    Report message7

  • Message 8

    , in reply to message 7.

    Posted by sweetpetal (U14379749) on Thursday, 26th May 2011

    I wasn't dyslexic, but, no one knew I was deaf until I was eleven years old. I went to an ordinary school, and, as I taught myself to lip read, and, was always near the top of the class it wasn't picked up. In fact my best subject was English. When they realised I was deaf they wanted to send me to a residential deaf school, but, I didn't want to go. So, I went through school as the odd one out, with no extra help what so ever. I wore a box hearing aid with two strings which did wonders for my confidence. I eventually went to University and gained a 2:1 in History. I hated school, and, the treatment that I had there, but, I didn't allow it to hold me back. However, I have never felt that I fitted in anywhere. To the Deaf I am hard of hearing/hearing, and the to hearing I am deaf. I am actually very profoundly deaf I have the hearing tests to prove it!! Not that I am bothered, but, it makes life very difficult for those like me with the Big D and little d. However, at the end of the day we are all deaf, and, we get by the best way we can through life regardless.

    Report message8

  • Message 9

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by tishcat (U14708219) on Thursday, 26th May 2011

    no one can deny that deaf clubs are dying. The old structure of deaf school onto deaf club has gone.
    I was mainstreamed and despite coming from a large family of deaf people, never felt comfortable at the deaf club anyway. I understood as little of what was going on as i did in the hearing world. This had nothing to do with big D or whatever, just a struggle to communicate.
    Since then, i have made an effort to learn a little sign and thankfully can communicate a little better with my deaf peers.
    I think that its an unspoken problem among the mainstream generation that we would love to mix with others who share and understand our disability, and not be isolated in a sea of hearing people. I know that there are many more people out there who feel lost but lack the tools to change their situation.
    Personally, i am trying to volunteer with my local deaf society to at least make sure that there is a supply of leaflets/ info etc at the hearing aid clinic. Just so anyone going there is aware that there is more on offer than just" heres your aid, Good luck"
    It is so easy to snipe at the often hilarious viewpoints and attitudes, but much harder to come up with at least partial solutions
    The new blood which is needed at deaf clubs is sat out there isolated and uninformed i think. It is a tragedy that this has been allowed to happen, but it isn't the fault of any one section of (deaf) society just natural stagnation from lack of material initiatives. Please let the next time i read about "good news for the deaf community" let it not be another video in BSL telling me how to fill in my council tax. Rant over

    Report message9

  • Message 10

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by stueyyy (U8300187) on Thursday, 26th May 2011

    Guess you are Hard of Hearing then ?

    Go blow fuse elsewhere you ignoramus idiot, you need to grow up, with outburst for unknown reason......Some Cochlear Implants dont work.

    Only reason it really blows up, is because HARD OF HEARING or severe Hearing if you like, DONT LIKE IT.

    So get back in your pram wind up merchant....It 100% people like you are the ones that we dont want.....

    Report message10

  • Message 11

    , in reply to message 10.

    Posted by stueyyy (U8300187) on Thursday, 26th May 2011

    last message was for nativeson (U14540277)

    Report message11

  • Message 12

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by PrtbDeaf (U14881934) on Thursday, 26th May 2011

    last message was for nativeson (U14540277)  I totally agree with the message 10 about the message one...I am profoundly Deaf, thats it.....its my choice choosing big "D"... the message one needs grow up too....

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to message 11.

    Posted by PrtbDeaf (U14881934) on Thursday, 26th May 2011

    last message was for nativeson (U14540277)  last message was for nativeson

    Report message13

  • Message 14

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by gammati (U14550922) on Thursday, 26th May 2011

    Who has been going on about it?
    I have always deplored the way in which some people try to draw a line through the deaf community. Some people can live their lives as full-time signers because they live in the right environment. Everyone else has to compromise, if they want to get on, that is.
    The Big D /Little d argument has always been about a small number of Deaf people making a lot of fuss. Lately they have gone a bit quiet so I thought maybe that was an end to it.
    It's silly. It belongs with "My football team is better than yours" and that's not how the real world works.
    More sinister is the way in which some people have tried to influence deaf forums by bullying them into silence. And they talk about "oppression". Ha! 
    you spoke too soon!! see messages 10 and 12

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to message 14.

    Posted by AndyfromCornwall (U14342750) on Friday, 27th May 2011

    It doesn't do a bit of good. People just ignore it because the truth is that English is NOW a better way. There are so many options such as text and email and that is what deaf people choose to use.

    Historically sign language was vitally important but modern times have brought so many more accessible communication channels and deaf people have shown a preference for them. There has been a major shift in the Deaf outlook but some people can't accept that and unfortunately they are being excluded. That is their choice. I find that BSL is too slow, too limited in scope and with almost no support. Why would people stick with it when there are easier ways?

    Come what may, people will do what is in their own best interests and no matter how much propaganda is put out by the virulently pro-BSL lobby they will not make any headway. That's not because anyone is plotting against them but because people are acting independently to improve their ways of communication. Mobile phones and the Internet have improved all that forever.

    I doubt that BSL will ever die out because there will always be deaf people. But despite the huge efforts over the last 15 years or so it hasn't "taken" as a universal way of communication for deaf people. Despite the boasting of its advocates none of their campaigning has worked. Instead deaf people have turned to other methods and it's pointless to oppose that.

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to message 9.

    Posted by M M (U14200747) on Friday, 27th May 2011

    I wish you luck in trying to widen the deaf club membership middle-aged deaf do not require the clubs, so the predominant membership these days is elderly. My local club has an 60-40 membership the dominant membership being HoH and it does work, albeit they have theirs 'corners' to sit in and deaf theirs... There is an dedicated 'BSL deaf' club another day and clearly they do not welcome mixes with HoH or hearing people at all.

    I don't think it is communication, people will always find some level. Its an mind-set, honed in these awful deaf schools and segregated social areas, segregated by consent, maintained because others think deaf can't hack it, and it's not design. I did buy the communication excuse at the start, I don't now. Deaf were I believe conned by technology they think as they can text or skype people they are now in it. But the essence of an deaf community even to my time-worn and weary eyes is face to face meet ups, more so with deaf than hearing.

    Nobody stands under the lamplight at all hours yakking away any more. I think they are losing the community big time. They will not listen it's there live with it, when they are older they might want clubs then, but it will be too late and as they sit alone in front of a computer elderly they will come to realise this isn't community or social at all. They aren't uniformed tishcat they are past caring, much much worse.... They will defend isolation to the end, say twitter is the new God. Text life.

    Report message16

  • Message 17

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by Lenci (U14059056) on Sunday, 29th May 2011

    That film was really interesting. I really want to learn BSL just as an interest really because I like languages. Would there really be anyone as nasty as that guy though if I got it wrong? That's what puts me off a little! Then again the other guy, he was nice smiley - smiley

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to message 17.

    Posted by tishcat (U14708219) on Sunday, 29th May 2011

    i think you'll find that that was a fictional "bad guy". In reality most deafies are open and friendly, just have off moments like everyone else.
    You mite sometimes not get that impression from reading our ramblings but mostly its in the spirit of good natured debate.
    Well done for taking an interest in our language and i hope you pick it up well

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to message 18.

    Posted by Lenci (U14059056) on Monday, 30th May 2011

    I've just found a course at my local(ish) college so I'll be doing BSL level 1 in September! YAAY!!!

    Report message19

  • Message 20

    , in reply to message 8.

    Posted by ZenPilgrim (U14885892) on Monday, 30th May 2011

    I totally empathise how you feel stranded between the two communities. I have been deaf only for 5 years, but have started to learn BSL so that I feel more connected to/can communicate with those for whom BSL is their preferred community. But also, because, whenever I went to any deaf meetings I was the only one who couldn't sign.

    With cochlears and BAHAs the lines are becoming so blurred I wish we could just be one group. That way we would have a much stronger voice.

    Report message20

  • Message 21

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by M M (U14200747) on Wednesday, 8th June 2011

    AH so, the impossible dream, just be true to yourself it's far too late to be a deafie and why bother ? if you are 'hearing stock' then it won't work anyway. You might just as well push for lessons in re-establishing hearing communications best you can, assuming of course you can find if such classes exist so far I've been deaf 30 odd years and haven't seen any. Do you assume BSL will equip you for re-establishing yourself in an hearing world ? or have you abandoned the thought of trying ? since BSL is an deaf communication NOT an hearing one. You have to soul-search really where do your feelings lie, with the deaf or with hearing ? If there is one thing I learnt from painful experience is going deaf doesn't make you a deafie.... it's a bit of an cultural-political punch up mostly...

    Report message21

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