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Terry Riley receives honorary degree

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Messages: 1 - 7 of 7
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Charlie Swinbourne (U14039771) on Thursday, 9th September 2010

    Just to let everyone know Terry Riley, former editor of See Hear, has just received an honorary degree - info below -

    Pioneering BBC See Hear Editor receives honour

    The University of Wolverhampton has presented an honorary degree to Terry Riley, the first Deaf Editor of the BBC’s See Hear programme.

    Terry, who is now the Chief Executive of the British Sign Language Broadcasting Trust (BSLBT), received the honour at a graduation ceremony yesterday (Tues 7 Sept 2010).

    The award was presented to Terry in recognition of his outstanding contribution to broadcasting for Deaf and hard of hearing viewers and for promoting British Sign Language (BSL), through the medium of television, to a wider audience.

    At the ceremony at Wolverhampton Grand Theatre, Terry said: “It’s a great honour to receive such a distinguished award, and it’s very humbling to follow in the footsteps of one of my heroes, Arthur Dimmock MBE who himself was awarded an Honorary degree by the University of Wolverhampton. To be honest I am gobsmacked and chuffed to bits.”

    Terry spoke about the importance of British Sign Language and the power and influence television has on our lives.

    The Honorary Degree of Doctor of Arts was presented by the School of Law, Social Sciences and Communications, and Terry was nominated by Senior Lecturers, Joan Fleming and John Hay MBE, on behalf of their Deaf Studies and BSL/English Interpreting team.

    John Hay said: “We are delighted to recognise Terry’s contribution to British Sign Language in this way. He has been active in promoting British Sign Language (BSL) to a wider audience through the medium of TV. His association with the University of Wolverhampton has been intertwined with his unstinting support of the popular Deaf TV and Film Festivals and more recently Deaffest, both annual events of national importance held at the Light House Media Centre in Wolverhampton.”

    Terry has been an advocate for British Sign Language for over 40 years. Born into a Deaf family, both his parents were Deaf and sign language users. He has a wealth of experience in Deaf Television, having started in 1987 as a researcher on the BBC’s See Hear, a community programme for deaf and hard-of-hearing viewers, and working his way up to become Editor in 2002. He was instrumental in setting up the European Deaf TV and Video network, which now broadcasts in 20 countries including the USA, Japan, Greece and Australia.

    He has been associated with the British Deaf Association (BDA) for many years and received its highest honour, the BDA Medal of Honour, for his work in promoting and empowering Deaf people. He was elected as the Chair of the British Deaf Association for 2009-2011.

    Following his retirement from his role at See Hear two years ago, Terry was appointed Chief Executive of the newly established British Sign Language Broadcasting Trust (BSLBT).

    Other notable successes include a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Remark! TV Awards in 2003 and the Royal National Institute for Deaf People (RNID) Award for outstanding services to television in 1997.

    In addition, Gallaudet University WORLDEAF Cinema Festival selected Terry to receive the first WORLDEAF Cinema Festival Motion Media Producer Award for 2009.

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by AndyfromCornwall (U14342750) on Tuesday, 11th January 2011

    I wonder if ANYONE has been honoured for services to lipreading?

    Report message2

  • Message 3

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by stueyyy (U8300187) on Tuesday, 11th January 2011

    I think I should be honoured for Lip reading..lol

    Report message3

  • Message 4

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by stueyyy (U8300187) on Tuesday, 11th January 2011

    Andy had complete Clean out on pc lost your web site lol..Please give it back..Had it written in book, cant find book lol typical.lol

    Report message4

  • Message 5

    , in reply to message 4.

    Posted by AndyfromCornwall (U14342750) on Tuesday, 11th January 2011

    The easiest way to find it is to Google for Out of Hours. The BBC doesn't like me posting the link here. They can't stand the rivalry smiley - smiley

    Report message5

  • Message 6

    , in reply to message 2.

    Posted by M M (U14200747) on Wednesday, 12th January 2011

    Didn't Jack Ashley AND The loverly Evelyn Glennie get them ? The problem is they can't find anyone to talk tidy lol............

    Report message6

  • Message 7

    , in reply to message 5.

    Posted by stueyyy (U8300187) on Sunday, 16th January 2011

    Its ok got sorted, found my lickle book with addys in smiley - smiley

    How you doing Andy, and how C.Implant doing?

    Report message7

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