Dancing On Wheels  permalink

So What's Wrong with Dancing on Wheels?

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Messages: 41 - 51 of 51
  • Message 41

    , in reply to message 3.

    Posted by charlie248888 (U14350131) on Monday, 22nd February 2010

    Hi Pennydropper, I understand where ya coming from in regards to dancing on wheels being in competition with able-bodied dancers. The problem here is it would not be fair competition, with those in wheelchairs not dancing in quite the same way as the able-bodied. I think dancing competitions, or any competition has to be "fair" and unbiased, this would be impossible all mixed together. However, I am annoyed that dancing on Wheels is on BBC 3 what's wrong with BBC 1 or 2 on a Sat night ???

    Report message1

  • Message 42

    , in reply to message 41.

    Posted by DavidG (U2600889) on Monday, 22nd February 2010

    >> The problem here is it would not be fair competition, with those in wheelchairs not dancing in quite the same way as the able-bodied. I think dancing competitions, or any competition has to be "fair" and unbiased, this would be impossible all mixed together <<

    Rubbish!

    How do 'artistic interpretation' or 'technical excellence' change depending on whether you are able-bodied, a wheelchair user, or disabled in any other way? These are just excuses made by people without the imagination or will to allow true equality.

    Report message2

  • Message 43

    , in reply to message 38.

    Posted by Ailgeog (U14347658) on Monday, 22nd February 2010

    Hossylass

    Thank you so much, its great to get as many people involved with my project. Although at the end of the day it is a university dissertation I hope it will actually be of some use - relating to the other debates about dancing on wheels I think there is too much emphasis in society on the difference between ability and disability, normal and 'different; which I feel is a result of society misunderstanding disability.

    Anyway, thanks again

    Report message3

  • Message 44

    , in reply to message 43.

    Posted by Glistener (U5249510) on Wednesday, 24th February 2010

    Brian Fortuna's mum who is recognised in the US as somethig of an expert on wheel chair dancing has made a point which several of us on here agree with. She says they should have "ditched the celebrities" and paired professional or experienced dancers ( I personally think it could have been either experienced AB or wheel chair dancers) with the "new to dance" partner. That way, the level of the dancing would improve.

    I think she is right but it wasn't going to happen. I think they needed Celebs to hook people into the programme but it should be considered for a future show.

    Thoughts anyone?

    Report message4

  • Message 45

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by myrtlemaid (U7171398) on Wednesday, 24th February 2010

    Id agree it would have been better if theyd had both pro, ( or excellent amateur) non disabled dancers, and also as hossy said Id like there to have been established and experienced wheelchair dancers too so that the base they started from was higher.. especially as this competition is suposed to be to get the competitors to enter for a big event later.

    I do agree tho that maybe the celebs were put there to hook in an audience . Now tbh I didint actually know who a lot of them were (but then I *am * out of touch with who's the "in thing" and why), so the hook didnt work for me so Id have been more likely to have watched had maybe some of the pro dancers from its more popular older brother programme danced with the wheelchair users..

    I guess im a tad cynical but I do wonder if the show is , as well as getting the team together, aimed at show casing certain not terribly well known celebs in the hope their careers prospects are improved.

    Report message5

  • Message 46

    , in reply to message 20.

    Posted by Mary (U14355725) on Thursday, 25th February 2010

    Dancing on wheels is simply good entertainment. Why shouldn't we be able to see this sport. If a by-product is that it inspires a disabled or able-bodied person to take up dancing so much the better but it doesn't have to do that it justify itself.

    I understand why celebs were brought in but couldn't they have used the Strictly professionals who are celebs in their own right and amazing dancers.

    Report message6

  • Message 47

    , in reply to message 46.

    Posted by DavidG (U2600889) on Friday, 26th February 2010

    >> Dancing on wheels is simply good entertainment. ... it doesn't have to do that it justify itself.<<

    Unfortunately it's not 'simply' anything and in the opinion of many of us it does have to justify itself. DOW promotes a damaging model of disability as personal tragedy that sets back our hopes of true equality. If it can't even get simple disability etiquette right, then how accurate a picture of disability do you think it's portraying?

    It's extremely likely the Beeb will point to DOW as an example of the corporation meeting it's Disability Equality Duty'. To quote from 'Doing the Duty' "this duty is not necessarily about changes
    to buildings or adjustments for individuals, it’s all about including equality for disabled people into the culture of public authorities in practical and demonstrated ways. This means including disabled people and disability equality into everything from
    the outset". For the Beeb that covers not only its behind the scenes practices but its programming output. This means it has to show its audience coverage of disabled people that actively promotes their integration in society in a positive manner while not reinforcing damaging and inaccurate historical stereotypes. A segregated post watershed show on a Thursday night on Beeb 3 versus an able-bodied equivalent at prime time on Saturday night on Beeb 1 is clearly problematical.

    Report message7

  • Message 48

    , in reply to message 1.

    Posted by tinyrosemarie (U4270953) on Friday, 26th February 2010

    I think like a lot of shows that start on BBC3 or 4 or even BBC2 the producers are unsure how the public will react so put it on a slightly less watched channel. I am sure they will consider transferring to BBC 1 if the ratings are good. All the forum discussion about it being an insult I think is wrong. I know I am going to upset a few people, but we hold the para-olympics for the reason we do. I am disabled although not in a wheelchair all the time and I don't feel sidelined. I just thoroughly enjoyed the show, love Brian Fortuna for his enthusiasm and often no-nonsense approach and all the competitors. There are such a wide variety of differences between the wheelchair dancers in respect of health and mobility, that if they had been on a level playing field, I feel someone like Harry would have been out the first week and look how he has blossomed.

    Can't we just enjoy a programme and give encouragement for it to be given new air time and another series and then perhaps some alterations could be made.

    Report message8

  • Message 49

    , in reply to message 44.

    Posted by tinyrosemarie (U4270953) on Friday, 26th February 2010

    I think you are right. Heather Small and Mark Foster are not great dancers although they are lovely people. It would have been better to have paired the wheelchair users with really good amateur or professional dancers. Maybe this might happen if it gets another series.

    Still don't think they can compete on a level playing field on SCD, it might end up with a sympathy vote, and we get enough dodgy voting as it is. Also needs to be a celeb in a wheelchair anyway.

    Report message9

  • Message 50

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by Friend of Moose (U14307683) on Friday, 26th February 2010

    I'm watching it as someone who used to like Strictly but got bored by its formulaic nature. For some years I had a disabling illness which affected my mobility - so I have some understanding of stereotyping etc. But I'm now fully mobile, and perhaps less conscious of these issues now.

    I like the fact that the show is smaller, so that there is more chance to get to know the contestants. While I agree that some of the details fit into models (Triumph over Tragedy? Over-medicalisations) that must be offensive to some, and annoying to many, I do find that the dancers come over pretty strongly as individuals. Whereas on Strictly, there are just vacuous celebs going 'Strictly means everythign to me.' And the arguments between the judges, the disputes the dancers have with each other and Bryan are fascinating..

    I also found the dance between Harry and Michelle very moving. So although the programme is awkward and clunky in some ways, it does manage to be magical too...

    Report message10

  • Message 51

    , in reply to message 48.

    Posted by DavidG (U2600889) on Friday, 26th February 2010

    >> All the forum discussion about it being an insult I think is wrong. <<

    Wrong, or just not something you agree with? There's a difference.

    >> we hold the para-olympics for the reason we do <<

    I'm not sure what your point is here, but I'm a huge fan of disability sport, whether that be the paralympics or anything else. My issue isn't with the sport, but with the structure of the programme and its wider relationship to the Beeb's DED.

    >> Can't we just enjoy a programme and give encouragement for it to be given new air time and another series and then perhaps some alterations could be made. <<

    I don't think we can really regard DOW solely as a new show. It's clearly the latest in the line that started with Beyond Boundaries and then moved through Missing Top Model and ultimately DOW. There's no evidence that this disability slot will migrate to any higher audience channel, in fact the evidence rather suggests that we've been given a specific ghetto slot so that the Beeb can claim to be doing something about its DED without causing any substantive change to its output. DOW is just a rather creaky facade to allow them to get away with doing essentially nothing and, after five years of this, people have had enough and are starting to make their obujections clear.

    Report message11

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