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Children in Need

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Messages: 1 - 20 of 211
  • Message 1. 

    Posted by Swift_ (U1723094) on Saturday, 12th November 2005

    Ok, this may just be me, but I'm getting sick of opening my email box to see ever more emails about CiN.

    My basic beef with them is that they only give to organisations, not individuals...but then use individuals' cases for the sob story aspect.

    I'm not denying the support's needed, due to lack of government funding etc...just wish it didn't feel so false.

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  • Message 2

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Chris_Page (U557481) on Saturday, 12th November 2005

    Trouble is, while the public are still willing to buy into it, the political climate will not change - government will still continue to abdicate their responsibility for providing the services that the voluntary sector provide, and the public will not see the effect of their (albeit generous) giving does nothing to change the way Disabled people and other disadvantaged groups are seen as "them", allowing the givers a comforting buffer zone which wrongly assures them that their contribution is enough.

    The only people it appears to help in the long-term are those celebs who dine out on all the good PR that appearing on it gives them.

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  • Message 3

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Loopy_S (U1819434) on Saturday, 12th November 2005

    My basic beef with them is that they only give to organisations, not individuals...but then use individuals' cases for the sob story aspect.
     


    The thing is that organisations are a bit unpersonal. For example, if I go up to someone and say "hey, Whizz-kidz is a great charity and gets wheelchair for kids when the NHS lets them down". They'll go "oh yeah, that sounds quite good..."

    If I go up to them and say "Gosh, I know this lovely kid who can't walk and who is stuck indoors all the time. He can't get from one room to another. His parents have to drag or carry him everywhere, which is difficult because he's getting older and heavier. He'll want to go to school soon, but might not be able to...He is on a waiting list for an electric wheelchair from the NHS but still has years to wait...Isn't it awful?! By the way, I know this charity Whizz-kidz who might be able to give him an electric wheelchair and give him freedom and independence... It is so sad that they're a little short on funds right now..."

    Which approach is going to get the most money?! The sad thing is that you have to pull at people's heartstrings for them to fork out some money.

    The bigger problem is that this sort of charity shouldn't be needed. It might be better to raise awareness of the gaps in the system and the problems disabled people encounter through lack of government funding and help. If they lobbied the government instead, we might get better long term results.

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  • Message 4

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by weeherdy (U1879668) on Saturday, 12th November 2005

    Don't get me started on CiN! Elsewhere on this board I recently had a wee rant about it but my main objections are much as Chris has outlined. In addtion I personally find it quite emarrassing going out with my disabled son on that day because somehow everyone is focussed on children (in need) and even though we can never just be anonymous people in the street at the best of times (apart form anything my son has a very unusual shade of red hair!!) that day is the worst.

    What about older people in need? Not nearly so "appealling" though is it, even though the country's population is ageing and the needs of older people are just as important.

    The other thing is that the prog itself is more and more full of groups of poeple and orgs like shops, banks etc trying to outdo each other on how much money they have raised. If instead they made sure they had accessible premises and well trained staff, plus suitable shopping trolleys etc that would for people be much more long term use. Similarly everyone who gives money and then thinks "I've done my good deed now" would actually do more long term good by paying a wee bit more tax - yet everyone seems to abhor that idea. But how else can good services be paid for and people be released form the burden of being charity cases?

    Oh and one final thing! At my son's (mainstream) school last year one of the teachers was standing at the gate as they left, with the pudsey tin asking the kids to give "to the children who haven't got what we've got" !!!
    Somehow she saw it as a completely "other" sort of thing "we're alright jack" or something despite the fact that in her school there was my physically disabled son (with Whizz Kids chair and just about to go off on a family networking weekend part funded by CiN) a child with NF1, a number of looked after children, some on the autistic spectrum, some who are young carers etc etc.

    That's what charity bashes like CiN perpetuate - the idea that charity is needed by "poor unfortunate others" - yet ironically until decent provision is made we do have to rely on this sort of feel-good-factor benevolence!

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  • Message 5

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by ajl338 (U1934444) on Saturday, 12th November 2005

    I am a bit fed up with getting CiN emails aswell.
    There are hundreds of deserving charities. I am a trustee for a small national charity which does fantastic support work but then so do hundreds of simular charities. Most are providing support which is sadly lacking from the NHS. The NHS tell you whats wrong and charities pick up the pieces.

    Sadly also it is becomming extreamly hard for charities to fundraise. Grants are becomming much tighter and only aimed at specific projects. So as a charity you can do fantastic projects but you cant get core funds just to function. Everyone is finding getting funds hard, particually this year as a lot of money went towards the tsarnami and various high profile poviety campaigns. So basically any small charities they put most their funds to the people they are helping and not to advertising for funds are struggling.

    annie

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  • Message 6

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by RoseRodent (U1896879) on Saturday, 12th November 2005

    What I hate is the high-profile giving of something lavish (and often unnecessary) item to a single person or group of people:

    Here is the multisensory room we provided for this youth project which has 8 children. Great, but why isn't it in an NHS or open access position where it can benefit more than just 8 children? How about a local library

    Or this is the custom-built super-comfort 'delite' hand trike with glitzy wheels and built-in MP3 that we have provided for little Jack (who certainly did require a hand trike, but one of a standard specification to bring him into equality with other children his age, not something extra special to "make up for" his disability).

    I'd rather provide for the basic requirements of 1,000,000 children than the luxury requirements of 10,000, especially as the focus of the charity is to provide for those in desperate need.

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  • Message 7

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Chris_Page (U557481) on Saturday, 12th November 2005

    Although the appeal itself has been going on since the 1920's or 30's, it's only been this high profile since about 1980 (?). That, of course, is a double-edged sword. They have to invent more elaborate ways of publicising and staging the event now it's firmly in the public domain - and it would be seen as taking a sacred cow to the abattoir if we criticised it in an equally high profile way.

    Any protests are never shown, and the participants are made to feel as though they are committing an act of treachery against their fellow Disabled people by those who get off on such "charity porn", or have a professional vested interest in it.

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  • Message 8

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Chris_Page (U557481) on Friday, 18th November 2005

    OK Peeps - it's The Big Non-Day!

    Tell us what you're NOT going to be doing for Uncle Terry's Pitython - and be creative! smiley - devil

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  • Message 9

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by widget (U2260877) on Friday, 18th November 2005

    I'm NOT going to be sponsored to see how many exploding balloons fill a Robin Reliant and then show what a brave little disabled girly i am by sitting in it while they push the detonator button.

    Although then again, it could be fun..........

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  • Message 10

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Chris_Page (U557481) on Friday, 18th November 2005

    As for myself, I'm NOT going to be enjoying a full body wax whilst singing all 158 verses of the Greek National Anthem.....smiley - yikes

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  • Message 11

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by widget (U2260877) on Friday, 18th November 2005

    But that could be fun too........wink wink
    (haven't got any emoticons boo hoo)

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  • Message 12

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by lolajayne (U2450208) on Friday, 18th November 2005

    I don't get why you're all so anti??? OK Peeps - it's The Big Non-Day!

    Tell us what you're NOT going to be doing for Uncle Terry's Pitython - and be creative! smiley - devil 

    Report message12

  • Message 13

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Chris_Page (U557481) on Friday, 18th November 2005

    Read the whole thread, Lola.....smiley - winkeye

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  • Message 14

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by widget (U2260877) on Friday, 18th November 2005

    Chris, where do i get Emoticons?

    Report message14

  • Message 15

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Chris_Page (U557481) on Friday, 18th November 2005

    There is a small box on the right hand side when you press "Reply".

    Report message15

  • Message 16

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by lolajayne (U2450208) on Friday, 18th November 2005

    Ahhh, thanks Chris. I hadn't thought of that! Still think some of you are being a bit harsh! Read the whole thread, Lola.....smiley - winkeye 

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  • Message 17

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Chris_Page (U557481) on Friday, 18th November 2005

    I am sure there are many well-meaning people out there, but I think it could be channelled into a more socially-conscious effort to highlight Disability and other issues.

    I'd rather the International Day of Disabled People was publicised. And it needn't be in a po-faced manner, either.

    Report message17

  • Message 18

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by widget (U2260877) on Friday, 18th November 2005

    smiley - doh Got em!
    You're a smiley - star

    I'd much rather put my money into a charity close to my heart like REACH

    Report message18

  • Message 19

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by lolajayne (U2450208) on Friday, 18th November 2005

    I agree with you about the International Day of Disabled People, Children in need has a different set of objectives and raised 30mill last year for orgs supporting children and young people. I am sure there are many well-meaning people out there, but I think it could be channelled into a more socially-conscious effort to highlight Disability and other issues.

    I'd rather the International Day of Disabled People was publicised. And it needn't be in a po-faced manner, either. 

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  • Message 20

    , in reply to this message.

    Posted by Chris_Page (U557481) on Friday, 18th November 2005

    The thing is, it could be done by more government funding, but the odd thing is that people begrudge playing more taxes, but they happily give to charity.

    Rather strange logic, no?

    Report message20

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