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Ten things you never knew about Sherwood Forest
The Major Oak - Sherwood Forest
The Major Oak - Sherwood Forest
Here's some stunning facts about the new National Nature Reserve at Sherwood Forest.
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From BBC News >>
Robin Hood's forest protected
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1
In mediaeval times when times were hard - bark and acorns from the trees in Sherwood Forest would substitute for flour in bread and dough cakes.
2
The term "Forest" was by and large a legal one. In fact, by medieval times Sherwood Forest consisted of not only woodland but also open areas of sandy heath, 'wood pasture' and settlements. The term 'forest' was an area where the king's Forest Laws held sway - the stealing of a deer could result in the offender being blinded, having a hand chopped off or being hanged. Felling a tree could lead to imprisonment.

3
At the time the Major Oak began it's life, there were only a few thousand people living in Nottinghamshire in roughly 300 villages.
4
Pollen records show that there has been an unbroken cover of woodland here since the end of the last Ice Age, some 10,000 years ago.
5
Over 900 trees in Sherwood Forest are 600 years old or more.
6
There are 1500 species of beetle and 200 types of spiders found in Sherwood Forest.
7
The Major Oak may in fact be three or four trees which fused together centuries ago and not a single tree.
8
The King allowed only a few privileged people the right to hunt in Sherwood Forest (apart from himself of course!). The Archbishop of York could hunt 9 days in the year - 3 at Christmas, 3 at Easter, 3 after Whit Sunday.
9
Sherwood means shire wood and the forest sometimes used to be referred to as Nottingham Forest.
10
Sherwood Forest was once one of the largest of about 90 Royal forests, which at their greatest extent in the 13th Century covered around a third of England - it extended right to the walls of medieval Nottingham.

We all know Sherwood Forest is famed as the home of Robin Hood. But now it's being recognised as one of England's most important homes for wildlife too. Read more >>
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