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20 August 2014
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Come to the Ceilidh

To celebrate 60 years of Scottish Country Dancing in N. Ireland the RSCDS Belfast Branch are holding a Friday night Ceilidh and Saturday of Scottish Country Dancing workshops.

ML 1030

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Come to the Ceilidh

 

To celebrate 60 years of Scottish Country Dancing in N. Ireland the RSCDS Belfast Branch are holding a Friday night Ceilidh and Saturday of Scottish Country Dancing workshops. Saturday will end with a Dance to the music of one of the finest bands from Scotland. At a ceilidh you need no experience of Scottish Country Dancing - all the dances are easy to do. Come as a group and this will be an evening out you will all remember with pleasure. Come on your own and make new friends.
I have been dancing for about 10 years and like many other people it keeps me fit and spares me the appartus and "unique perfume" of many gyms! I have made many friends and actually met my husband at one of the bigger dances a few years ago!
SCD is weight bearing therefore it builds bone density helping prevent osteoporosis. It also reduces cellulite.
It is mildly aerobic therefore helps improve circulation, strengthens heart muscles, and raises fitness levels. 30 mins of fairly easy dancing burns approx.160 calories: the equivalent of 20 minutes of vigorous swimming, a half hour of moderate housework, sponge washing the car or 13 hours of kissing !
Release of endorphins provides improved sleep patterns and reduced levels of stress and tension.
Building new friendships is a very common feature of SCD. Participation in a group activity builds self confidence through hands – on learning (or is it feet first learning?).

SCD is a structured form of dance which men enjoy. It also appeals to those who regard themselves as “scientific” rather than “arty”.
Scottish Country Dancing became popular in Northern Ireland in the 1940’s. Ceilidh Dancing was part of many communities with Scottish ancestry.
Social conditions and the popularity of free form music and dance in the 1970’s led to a dramatic decline in the numbers of people participating in SCD between 1976 and 1990.
SCD is a non denominational activity enjoyed all over the world. It uses both Scottish and Irish folk music. New dances are published each year so it is a living heritage.

There are currently over 400 Scottish Country Dancers in Ulster. Many of them have other hobbies in summer such as walking groups, waterskiing, travelling; SCD is a good way to keep fit over the winter (our season usually runs end of September - April).
If you would like ot find out more about this activity there is a wenbsite for N. Ireland Dancers www.scottishdancing.org.

See you at the Ceilidh! You don't have to be Scots to do it!


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