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Donegall Square South

Would any member have information or knowledge of photographs of the former terrace of ten Georgian houses numbered 1-10 Donegall Square South, Belfast.

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Would any member have information or knowledge of photographs of the former terrace of ten Georgian houses numbered 1-10 Donegall Square South, Belfast. They were built circa 1808 by Adam McClean and were situated between Linen Hall and Adelaide Sts.
No 4 (McCleans own dwelling) and No 5 were I believe the last survivors of the terrace, being demolished around the early seventies.

Your answers

Brian Willis: Is that the row which used to have a tea-room/cafe at one end, on the corner of Adelaide Street? It was in the basement. I think a Mrs. Donaldson was the manageress.

Prodigal: Yes I believe your right. No 1 was on the Adelaide St corner, while the houses near Linen Hall St were replaced I think in the 19th century with the building where the 10 Square Hotel is situated.

Raymond O`Regan and Claire Doyle - July '05
No. 1 was the residence of the famous Dr. William Drennan. He was the man who thought up the idea of uniting Catholic, Protestant and Dissenter under the banner of the United Irishmen. His sister Martha McTier helped set up the first Maternity Hospital at No.25 Donegall St. in the 1790,s a building that still exists today.

This was the forerunner of the present day Royal Maternity Hospital. Dr. Drennan writing to his sister when the Lying in Hospital (maternity hospital) was being set up to make sure that all the staff were to follow strict hygiene requirements. He also asked her to put up a sign in the ward "WASH YOUR HANDS". Dr. Drennan was one of the founders of the Acad. Institution in 1810.

Two of the houses near the corner of Linenhall St. became the International Hotel which was taken over by the City Council. To finish off, Adelaide St. was formerly known as Stephen St.

 

 

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