BBC HomeExplore the BBC
This page has been archived and is no longer updated. Find out more about page archiving.

16 October 2014
your place and mine
Your Place & Mine Radio Ulster Website

BBC Homepage
BBC Northern Ireland
home
antrim
Armagh
Down
Fermanagh
Londonderry
tyrone
greater Belfast
topics
coast
contact ypam
about ypam
help

print versionprint version










Contact Us

Irish Lace: Thelma Goldring

Thelma Goldring became obsessed with needlework after her husband bought her books on embroidery.

Personal Stories
 
Thelma Goldring with BBC reporter Helen Mark
Thelma Goldring (on right) with BBC reporter Helen Mark

"Needlework was my escape..."

Thelma Goldring became obsessed with needlework after her husband bought her books on embroidery. She was involved, with a few others, in the setting up of the Lacemakers Guild for Northern Ireland, of which she is now President. Thelma may never have had any formal training, but she still has created the most wonderful pieces of needlework - examples of which you can see below.

Through her love affair with lace, Thelma has made firm friends, travelled the length and breadth of Ireland and even spent time in Europe. In 1983 she was awarded a Churchill Fellowship, which enables people to pursue a dream spending up to 3 months anywhere in the world. Thelma's dream was to study lace in Italy - Venice to be exact. There are many connections between Irish and Venetian lace and she wanted to explore these. During her stay she was instructed in the local art of lacemaking. A shared interest in lace overcame any language problems, although Thelma found it hard to dispel their notion that she was a friend of Winston Churchill's!

Thelma Goldring NI 1983. Churchill Fellow
Thelma Goldring NI 1983. Churchill Fellow
With opportunities comes responsiblity
With opportunities comes responsibility

There are five main Irish laces - Irish Crochet Lace, Youghal Needlelace, Inishmacsaint Needlelace, Carrickmacross Lace and Limerick Lace. Thelma's favourite is Limerick, where the stitches are worked on to a net. You can view examples of Limerick, Carrickmacross and Crochet below, pieces beautifully produced by Thelma herself.


Limerick lace produced by Thelma Goldring
Irish whitework with drawn thread work edging, produced by Thelma Goldring
Irish tatting
Irish whitework with drawn thread work edging.
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
View close-up
View close-up


Irish crochet trimming produced by Thelma Goldring
Irish tatting produced by Thelma Goldring
Clones Lace
Irish tatting
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
View close-up
View close-up


Carrickmacross lace produced by Thelma Goldring
Clones lace produced by Thelma Goldring
Limerick lace
Carrick -ma-cross lace
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
View close-up
View close-up


Carrickmacross lace christening dress produced by Thelma Goldring
Wall hanging produced by Thelma Goldring
christening dress trimmed with tatting
and whitework embroidery
Wall hanging
Click to enlarge
View close-up of neckline
Click to enlarge



listen Listen
listen to Thelma Goldring talking to Your Place & Mine reporter Helen Mark about her interest in lace and her Churchill Fellowship visit to Italy.

(To access audio and video on your place and mine you need RealPlayer .)

Useful Web Links


Many thanks to the many people who pointed out our lace labeling errors, including Brenda Paternoster, Jean Nathan and Nicky H-Townsend. Hopefully we have got it right now ?

We have sent the perpetrator off to the corner of the office, armed with the various types of lace and tatting to show him the error of his ways! - Editor YP&M

 

Leslie Sercombe - April '06
I think the lace collar labeled irish tatting is in fact tape lace which could either be handmade or machine made tape with needlemade bars and fillings. This is similar to battenburg lace which is classed as a renaissance lace.

Sally Magill - June '05
The photo labelled "Limerick Lace" is in fact tatting. It is not worked "on to a net" but the whole fabric is worked freely with a shuttle. More examples of tatting can be seen on the Ring of Tatters website; www.ringoftatters.org.uk The collar labelled "Irish Tatting" is not tatting! It is tape lace. Commercially produced tape was shaped into patterns and tacked on to paper. Then fillings and connections between the shapes were worked in buttonhole and other stitches.

Reply from Mrs Narelle Butler - Victoria, Aus. December '04
I am very much sure that you have mixed up the labelling of the tatting piece and the limerick piece. I am Secretary of the Tatters' Guild of Australia , Victoria Branch and I know that the article labelled as limerick lace is in fact tatting. It still is an interesting article though!

 




About the BBC | Help | Terms of Use | Privacy & Cookies Policy