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16 October 2014
BBC Northern Ireland Voices

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O

 

Odd-as-get-out. Weird strange person From: J. Ed's note: I have also heard people described as 'as odd as tea in a po'.

 

Odds: A number of small coins or loose change

 

Ojus: phonetic of Odious, that favourite of the english public schoolboy. Terrible, great or very, as in 'Thon boy's an ojus nuisance.' or 'that was an ojus feed, so it was.' From Leda, Fermanagh

 

Orspal - hospital
'Pat's coming out of the orspal the mara'. From: JP Devlin.

 

On the drip: To be acquired through a hire purchase agreement ie 'He bought the lorry on the drip!'. From: Sally Kelly

 

On the rip: To embark on a [prolonged] drunken spree. From: Sally Kelly


On the sauce bottle: To be acquired through a hire purchase (HP) agreement ie 'He bought the lorry on the sauce bottle!'. From: Sally Kelly


Only landed: Replaces 'just arrived' ie "Sure he's only landed there now"
From: Sally Kelly

 

Ossified. Drunk. He's ossified. From: Linda

 

Other side: the side themens are on (Catholics/Protestants). Not to where they are passing to. From anon.

 

Oul: More than a Belfast pronunciation of old, it can add meaning according to the context. It can add affection, 'Ah don't where ah'd be without m'oul dog', or the opposite, 'let me wipe thon oul glar from the chile's eye.'' Edmund Porte adds: "oul" is also a term of extreme disparagement. e.g during the War, one would speak of "oul Hitler"

 

Oul' doll means "old woman" From Claire

 

Out of it - beyond tolerable limits. (Had enough of something) Used by converting the noun (subject of the excess) into a verb, eg: "I'm tea'd out of it." I'm baked-beanzed out of it. From Dominic Campbell.

 

Oxter: Armpit. 'Busy? I've bin up to m'oxters since I came in.'

 

Oxtercock: Carry someone by the armpits. 'We had to oxtercock him out of there brave 'n' quick, before the oul' targe twigged he was stocious.'

 

 

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