BBC HomeExplore the BBC
This page has been archived and is no longer updated. Find out more about page archiving.

16 October 2014

BBC Homepage
BBC NI

 


Contact Us

Breathing Places

Mark Patterson meets the whooper swans of Lough Swilly.

BBC Radio Foyle - Breathing Places Gallery

Whooper swan at Lough Swilly. Photo: WWT

Click to enlarge Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge Click to enlarge

 

WHOOPER SWANS Report #2

Seamus Burns talks to Mark as the Whooper Swans are on the move. They leave Toome and come up to Lough Foyle before flying to Iceland. Listen to the report.

Find out more by going to the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust website: Super Whoopers

The Tracking Project
Anyone traveling along the A6 Belfast to Derry road near Toomebridge, or along the M1 near Craigavon recently can not have failed to have noticed some large swan paintings. The paintings of the large white bird on a blue background had many people talking and speculation mounted as to what was going on. The explanation is simply that these are art installations put in place to help celebrate the link between the Lough Neagh Wetlands and Iceland. The large white birds featured are, of course, Whooper Swans, birds that breed in Iceland and spend the winter with us here in the Lough Neagh Wetlands. The birds have just begun their epic journey back to Iceland and their migration is being tracked via satellite on the internet.

Following several weeks of hard work spent assessing then baiting potential catching areas in the Lough Neagh Wetlands this winter, 25 Whooper swans were caught by cannon-net at 6:30am on 11th March 2008. A team of some 15 people, including members of the Irish Whooper Swan Study Group, staff from WWT Castle Espie and the Lough Neagh Wetlands Biodiversity Officer, helped in ringing, weighing, measuring then releasing the birds. Six Whooper Swans were fitted with GPS satellite-transmitters to monitor their migration from the Lough Neagh Wetlands to their breeding grounds within Iceland. The location of each of the Lough Neagh Wetlands Whooper Swans will be recorded 5-times per day, with the data downloaded every 10 days until the batteries in the transmitters run out - which may take up to one year.

Each of the six birds were named after the major rivers flowing into Lough Neagh and each has a large yellow leg ring with black numbers. They are Bann (ring number N4B), Moyola (N4K), Ballinderry (N3D), Blackwater (N3V), Sixmilewater (N3T) and Maine (N3S).

Find out more by going to the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust website: Super Whoopers



WHOOPER SWANS Report #1

Mark Patterson meets the whooper swans of Lough Swilly. With him are Graham McElwaine from Whooper Swan study group, Aevar Peterson an Icelandic ornithologist and Seamus Burns Lough Neagh wetlands biodiversity officer.


Find out more about whoopers: Super Whoopers

Listen button LISTEN

Listen to Mark Pattersons report on the Whooper Swan migration. Report #2.

Listen button LISTEN Listen to Mark Pattersons report from Lough Swilly. Whooper Report #1.

 

More Breathing Places...»


Springwatch

Autumnwatch

Do One Thing

Springwatch Poetry Competition 2007

Do One Thing - Your Pledges

Prehen Wood Red Squirrels

Breathing Places - Bird Boxes

The Radio Foyle Garden

S.E.E.D.S

Planting Wildflowers

Declan Duffy - Wildlife Diary

 

(The BBC is not responsible for the content on external websites)

 

  on next : Gerry Anderson

»

Autumnwatch 2007

»

Big Lottery Fund

»

Ulster Wildlife Trust

»

Gardeners Corner

»

BBC Nature

»

Conservation Volunteers

»

RSPB

»

Woodland Trust

»

BBC Community Bus
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external websites
Listen Live Email Breathing Places
Listen Live

028 7126 6522

Mark Patterson Facebook page - for anyone who wants to find out more about Mark's show.

 

Have your say on the BBC NI messageboard »

 
 

 



About the BBC | Help | Terms of Use | Privacy & Cookies Policy