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16 October 2014

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Coasts Mountains, Lakes & Rivers Settlement Land Use & Economic Activity Ecosystems
Headlands, Bays & Beaches Erosion, Caves, Stacks & Stumps Impact of Erosion Tourism & Human Interaction
Headlands, Bays and Beaches clipWatch Video Map

Script

Key Points

The Northern Ireland coastline is 650km long and varies dramatically in form.

From the large tidal inlet of Strangford Lough in County Down

...to the long sandy beaches of Benone Strand in Co. Londonderry

...to the high cliffs of the White rocks near Portrush in County Antrim

Coastlines are dynamic. The coast is constantly being created or destroyed by the movement of the sea.

Parts of the coast are eroded or worn away by the waves. The bigger and higher the waves the more erosion there will be. The resulting bits of rock and sand are transported and deposited in other areas.

The seven mile stretch of Benone Strand is an example of a Deposition landscape.

Beaches are formed from the transportation and depositition of sand and stone by the waves.

This is a part of the Donegal coastline near Malin Head. It is made up of a mixture of beaches headlands and bays.

Bays are sheltered openings that are found between the headlands that jut out into the sea. Bays contain beaches which can vary from a small beach with a few stones to large beaches made of sand.

Headlands and bays are normally found in areas that are made up of a mixture of rock types. The softer rocks are eroded more quickly and form bays. The harder rocks can withstand the waves for longer and are left behind, jutting out beyond the bays forming headlands. This process leaves the headlands exposed to the full force of the sea and the wind and increases the rate of erosion. Eventually the headlands will erode to form caves, arches, stacks and stumps. Any material that is eroded from the headlands is transported by the waves and deposited in the bays or on the long sandy beach.

The Northern Ireland coastline is 650km long and varies dramatically in form.

Beaches are formed from the transportation and depositition of sand and stone by the waves.

Headlands and bays are normally found in areas that are made up of a mixture of soft and hard rock that erode at different rates.

Bays are sheltered openings that are found between the headlands that jut out into the sea.



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