BBC HomeExplore the BBC
This page has been archived and is no longer updated. Find out more about page archiving.

16 October 2014

BBC Homepage
BBC NI Homepage

BBC NI Schools

BBC NI Learning

Landscapes
Unlocked

Explore

Focus On...

Clips & Scripts

Explore

Focus On...


Contact Us

Antrim Armagh Down Fermanagh Londonderry Tyrone
Benone Strand Toome to Mount Sandel Toome to Mount Sandel Banagher Dam
Banagher Dam clipWatch Video Banagher Dam map

Script

Key Points

With Lough Foyle in the distance, Loughermore Forest provides us with an arresting view from the air.

This is a commercial plantation, the main species here are varieties of spruce, pine and larch. But there are also mixed broadleaf trees to break up the blocks of conifers and provide a hardwood habitat for flora and fauna.

Like much of the rest of this area, the forest was once an expanse of peatland.

Northern Ireland has a high proportion of the remaining peat bog in both Ireland and the UK. This unique ecosystem exists only in the north west fringes of Europe, and conservation of it is now seen as vital.

Three miles west of Dungiven, we come to the Banagher Lake and Forest. The area includes the Altnaheglish reservoir, which supplies water to Londonderry and Limavady.

It's said that when St Patrick was ridding Ireland of its snakes, he first drove them into the rivers. One was too large to move from its pool in the Glenedra Water, so Patrick imprisoned it there. Legend claims that it's there to this day.

Banagher Glen contains one of the largest intact examples of old sessile oak woods in Northern Ireland.

And so to a wider view of the Sperrins. Many of the geographical features in this part of Northern Ireland came about because of the effects of the last ice age. The ice sheet was probably at its thickest here. It was also the slowest to melt. But it left us with some of the finest scenery on the island.

Loughermore Forest was once an expanse of peatland.

According to legend, St Patrick imprisoned a large snake in the Glenedra Water.

Many of the geographical features in this part of Northern Ireland came about because of the effects of the last ice age.



About the BBC | Help | Terms of Use | Privacy & Cookies Policy