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windmill.

Norfolk traditions
The battle is on to save Norfolk dialect but what old Norfolk-isms are in danger of disappearing? If it's Normal for Norfolk, we want to hear about it - and let the world know about it. How about it?

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I left Norfolk in 1952,and enjoy reading the letters from all the ex pats. The one thing I would like to know is, does anyone remember eating Savory Duck bought in Magdelen Street, Norwich, on Friday night. I still remember how everyone enjoyed it and have tried so many times to make it. Please can someone help? E-mail: gnbclem@tpg.com.au

BARBARA CLEMENT

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I am sure Hovells in Bridewell Avenue sell corn dollies, they used to. I have also seen them for sale at Wroxham Barns.
See Corn Dollies below

MAUREEN CLARKE

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Has anybody got any traditional Norfolk recipes? I enjoy collecting recipes, and am particularly interested in a recipe for Norfolk eggs - a potato and cheese version of a Scotch egg.

JACKIE BLOOMFIELD, ATTLEBOROUGH, NORFOLK

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I have carried on the "Jack Valentine" tradition with my 8-year-old daughter. We have been in the USA for 18 months but "Jack Valentine" will still be visiting, knocking at the door and leaving presents this Valentine's Day.

SHARON, USA (ex-Norfolk)

Corn dollies: In response to the person who wanted to know where to get corn dollies in the USA, I know just the spot. Plymouth Plantation, Plymouth, Mass, sells them in the gift shop. The Plantation is a reproduction Pilgrim village near Cape Cod. I was amazed when I saw the corn dollies, as I had been looking for them for years. The e-mailer can get in touch with me.

J LEAMY, WEYMOUTH, MA,USA

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Eel fishermen: During my last two visits to the Broads I was watching out for the eel fishermen. Alas I did not see one. Does nobody go eel fishing any more? These men were very friendly and always had time to talk to you and what interesting conversation it was. I for one certainly missed them.

JOHN KENDALL, LEICESTER

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Norfolk dialect: Dear Norfolk, how are you? I totally agree with your sentiments! It is about time the English stood up for themselves. Do you see yourselves as Englsi and East Anglian? I sure hope so. I am originally from Essex and am currently researching Saxon/Angle/jute early English history. The English have a long history and it is actually making me quite angry that I was not taught in school in England. Any comments on that please e-mail: katg19@hotmail.com Keep fighting for your rights and all the best to you.

MARK ANDERSON, WARSAW, INDIANA, USA

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Corn Dollies: I know it is not just a "Norfolk Thing", but I would love to get a couple of Norfolk corn dollies. My mum lives in King's Lynn and has looked around and can't seem to find any. If anyone knows where I could get them I would love to know. Also, how about "dockey"? I believe this is only said in certain counties of East Anglia. I used to have a Norfolk accent when I was younger, but I don't have one now. I love to hear it, 'bor!

PAM, LOUISIANA, USA (expat)

Anyone who does know where Pam can get corn dollies can e-mail us here at BBC Norfolk Online and we'll pass it on to her.
Jackie Meadows, Producer, BBC Norfolk

Hi there, The last time I was "home" in Wroxham I am sure I saw corn dollies at The Barns in Tunstead. They are trying to preserve all sorts of local crafts there. The Norfolk dialect needs a bit of explaining around the globe. Here in New Zealand they could not understand Bernard Mattews when he said lamb was "Bootiful" they can't understand many dialects unless they are expats like me. "mine how yu go Bor" and remember the Singing Postman

JAN BUTCHER, AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND

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How I laughed when I read Michael R. Wilde's message about St Valentine's Day. I also remember it well. When I first came to Bedford I tried to carry on this tradition, but people here thought me a bit strange. I also wondered if Michael Wilde ever lived at Frettenham. If anybody from home would like to make contact I would be very pleased and happy. My address is Isabelkeast@btinternet.com

ISABEL COLEGATE, BEDFORD

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Norfolk folk are well known for their hospitality and their assistance with travel directions. Whilst it seems that all roads in north Norfolk lead to 'By Road' (yet I have never been able to find it...), a favourite method of giving directions is to say '....you follow the road past the post office - only that ain't there no more...'

CLAIRE, KENT

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I wonder how many will understand this written by Bruther Will.

IN TER THU'CITY

We set orf wun mornin'abowt nine
My missus,meself,an' that dawter o'mine
They sed thet wood only taeke an hour or tew Jest got a few bits o'shoppin'tew dew.
In an' owt thuh shops we go
Sumthin'loike a bloomin' yoo yoo
Try anuther shop in thuh next street
Neither on'em care abowt my aching feet.
"I thowt we wus goin'home on thuh dinner-time bus"
"Oh cum along father,do'ant maeke such a fuss We'll git a bit o'dinna in a minit or tew
After thet I've only a few things tew dew"
We got thuh bus at a quarter-arter-four
Roight glad I was tew be outa that din,
They say they're cummin up wunce more
No bor,Oi sharn't be cummin agin

ISABEL COLEGATE, BEDFORD

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I may not be talking about the traditions which you intended but the one tradition I miss when visiting Norfolk is the old traditional butcher .I have been visiting the Broads now since the early 50s and one of the first things we used to do was to visit the local butcher and get some real Norfolk sausages. I remember walking up the hill from Ranworth into South Walsham just to get sausages. Bring back the traditional butcher.

JOHN KENDALL, LEICESTER

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With reference to typical Norfolk expressions, "fraun a cold" is a favourite of my mother. What about mauther, (I am not sure of the spelling morther or mauther) meaning woman? I believe the singing postman used that in one of his songs. In our house potatoes were always referred to as taters, also instead of a glass of beer, I remember hearing "a drop a beer".

HELEN, PUERTO DE LA CRUZ, TENERIFE

To Helen of Tenerife, taters may have been the word you used, but I remember potatoes being called spuds. Also a hole in your socks was also called a spud and your mother would darn it. Yes I also remember the singing postman and one of his songs Molly Lindley ( she smokes like a chimney). Sad to say I heard he died.

MICHAEL R WILDE, USA

Oh Michael, yes I do remember. A clip aroun your lug ole - And yes a hole in your sock was a spud. I still say that. I sometimes slip and ask someone if they are Luggy! [deaf]. How about "Shut your gob!"

SHEILA, PORTLAND, OREGON

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Example: A tradition on St Valentine's. As I only found out recently that on St Valentine's Day when your parents used to knock on the front door and run away leaving small gifts on the step for children of the house to find. I was under the impression that it was performed all over England, but as I found out after many years, it's performed only in Norfolk. Or last, but not least, how about the saying a clip around the lug hole.(ear)

MICHAEL R WILDE, STRATFORD,
CONNECTICUT, USA

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I love the expression that instead of getting in trouble, I "get wrong". I have never stopped using it, and although my kids have pretty much grown up here in the US, they regularly tell their friends they can't do something otherwise they will "get wrong off of me mum". I don't think it is used anywhere else in the UK, just Norfolk.

CHRIS THOMPSON, CENTREVILLE,
VIRGINIA, USA

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