Rio 2016: Team GB win two golds and four bronzes on day five

  • 11 August 2016

Team GB have won two gold medals and four bronzes on day five of the Rio Olympics.

Jack Laugher and Chris Mears won Britain's first ever gold Olympic diving title in the men's synchronised 3m springboard.

The pair led the points table from the end of round three, and performed a brilliant final dive under pressure.

Laugher, 21, and Mears, 23, broke down in tears when their win was confirmed by China's faltering final dive.

Britain had only ever won eight previous Olympic medals in the diving - all silver and bronze.

Joe Clarke won gold in the kayak slalom, winning in 88.53 seconds.

Clarke, who is 23, says he was inspired as a child by rowing legend Sir Steve Redgrave. He started paddling when he was 11 years old and on a kayaking trip with the scouts.

He's the first British man to win the kayak slalom since the Athens Olympics in 2004.

"Wow, I really can't put it into words," said Clarke. "I'm gobsmacked, and I knew I was capable of such a performance, but to put it down in the Olympic final is just a dream come true."

There were bronze medals for Chris Froome, Steven Scott, Sally Conway and Max Whitlock on day five.

Image copyright EPA
Image caption Chris Froome took bronze in the Olympic men's individual time trial

Chris Froome topped what he called an "amazing summer" in the men's time trial, just weeks after he won his third Tour de France.

Image copyright Reuters
Image caption Steven Scott beat teammate Tim Kneale to win the bronze medal

Steven Scott managed to clinch his medal in a dramatic double trap shoot-off against fellow Brit Tim Kneale.

Image copyright AFP
Image caption Sally Conway receives her bronze medal

In judo, Sally Conway lost her 70kg semi-final but won the bronze medal play-off.

Image copyright AFP
Image caption Max Whitlock has now won three Olympic bronze medals after two medals at London 2012

In gymnastics, Max Whitlock secured GB's first medal in the men's individual all-around event since the London Games of 1908.

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