Kids rap against 'bird goo' chemical

School children rap

School children from across Cornwall have started a campaign to try and stop a chemical thought to be killing seabirds from being dumped at sea.

One school have even written a rap song called 'Stop killing birds'.

Almost 3,000 seabirds have been affected by a 'sticky glue-like substance' since earlier this year.

People began to find birds washed up on beaches along the south coast of England in February. Some of them had died, and many more were injured.

The RSPB say it was because of a chemical spill, which they now know is known as PIB (polyisobutene). They say it is 'one of the worst UK marine pollution incidents in decades'.

It's thought this type of PIB is used in ship engines, and it's legal to release it into the sea under certain conditions.

Campaign

Now, about ten schools in the area have started campaigns to ban this substance from being dumped at sea.

At the school Newsround visited kids had painted banners and written a special song. They also say they've written to the government to ask them to stop the chemical being dumped.

Newsround has tried to arrange for the kids at the school to speak in person to the government minister taking the lead on the issue at the Department of Transport.

They've said he isn't available for an interview but gave us this statement:

"The government is determined to make sure that this sort of environmental tragedy does not happen again.

"We are working with other European countries to carry out an investigation into where these chemicals come from. When this investigation has ended, the results will be given to the International Maritime Organization.

'Excellent job'

"I would like to thank the children... for doing such an excellent job of raising awareness of this important issue and I hope they keep up the good work."

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