Curiosity rover beams back amazing pictures from Mars

15 August 2012 Last updated at 12:03 BST

The six-wheeled space robot has beamed back some more amazing pictures from the Red Planet.
Picture of the Curiosity rover on Mars
Up close, the six-wheeled Curiosity rover looks like a robot out of a film! This is just one of the pictures taken by its mast-cam which have been beamed back to Earth.
Picture of Mars landscape taken by Curiosity rover
Mars today is a dry dusty planet but experts think that three billion years ago it was covered in volcanoes and that four billion years ago, it might have had a massive ocean.
Picture of Mars landscape taken by Curiosity rover
Curiosity's ultimate goal is to go to the base of the big mountain, known as Mount Sharp, in the centre of the enormous Gale Crater.
Picture of the Curiosity rover on Mars
Experts hope to find rocks at the base of the mountain that are billions of years old which could hold clues as to whether there was ever water on the planet. They reckon that if there was water, then there may also have been some forms of life.
Picture of the Curiosity rover on Mars
But it could take up to a year for the rover to reach the base of the mountain. At the moment Nasa scientists think it's less than five miles away from the location but it'll take a while for them to work out the best route for it to take.
Picture of Mars landscape taken by Curiosity rover
The space robot's pictures are sent to Earth through antennas on the rover deck. Then they return commands from Nasa headquarters to tell the rover where it should drive next.
Picture of the Curiosity rover on Mars
Robots have been to Mars before but Curiosity is the first one which can take samples of the rocks and soil and send the information back to Earth.
Picture of the Curiosity rover on Mars
A nearby satellite has located where the rover is on the Red Planet. It's the first time that an aerial photo has been taken of the robot and it's helpful for mission control to know where it is.