The world's most common online passwords revealed

Woman enters a password into her laptop

"Oh damn! I've forgotten it... again." It's a common phrase of many people when trying to enter their password.

But while there might be a tendency to keep it simple and straightforward, the following list is enough to leave any keyboard wobbling with fear.

Twenty-five of the most common passwords from the 3.3 million leaked online last year have been revealed by SplashData.

The password management firm has been compiling the annual list since 2011.

A person enters a password on a keyboard

For the second year running 123456 and password were top of the pile.

We've taken a look at the list and if you're worried then maybe it's time to use song lyrics to stay safe online. No, really!

The word password used as login password

Common passwords are much easier to guess and that makes users vulnerable to having accounts like email and online banking hacked.

The word football is used to login in to Facebook
Image caption This one ranked 10th in the list, while hockey, soccer and golf made the top 100

New additions to this year's list include: baseball, dragon, football, mustang, access, master, michael, superman, batman and 696969.

Other number-related passwords on the list are: 12345, 12345678, 1234567890, 1234, 1234567, 111111, 123123.

The phrase abc123 is used to login to a Hotmail account
Image caption 14th on this list. Mixing letters and numbers is a good idea, but try to make it less obvious

Most of the passwords stolen and revealed in 2014 came from users in North America and Western Europe.

Experts recommend avoiding favourite sports, birthdays and keyboard patterns when thinking up a new password.

The phrase qwerty is used to login into Tumblr
Image caption This keyboard pattern made the top five

Shadow, monkey and phrases: letmein and trustno1 also made the list. Good advice, that last one.

The phrase trustno1 is used to login into Gmail

And if you're still in any doubt - our technology reporter Jonathan Blake has this advice.

"Don't use words, use phrases, like the first letter of each word," he says.

"And change it regularly."

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