Hollywood star Clint Eastwood saves man from choking

Steve John poses beneath photographs of Clint Eastwood in California Steve John says that Hollywood star Clint Eastwood saved his life by his quick thinking

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Hollywood actor Clint Eastwood has been credited with saving the life of a golf tournament director in California who was choking on a piece of cheese.

"Clint saved my life," said Steve John, director of the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am golf tournament.

The actor reportedly saw that Mr John was in difficulty and performed the Heimlich manoeuvre on him.

The technique requires a rescuer to carry out abdominal thrusts on a choke victim to dislodge the blockage.

"Suddenly, I couldn't breathe. It was as bad as it could have been," Mr John said of the incident at a drinks reception in Carmel-by-the-Sea on Wednesday.

"Clint came up behind me, and he knew exactly what to do."

The award-winning actor and director told the Carmel Pine Cone that he noticed Mr John had "that look of panic people have when they see their life passing before their eyes".

Mr Eastwood, 83, moved behind Mr John and carried out the manoeuvre.

"I gave him three good jolts, and that got it out," he said.

"And then I made him drink a big glass of water with a bunch of lemon squeezed in it."

Mr Eastwood, famous for his roles in Westerns and the Dirty Harry detective films, said he had performed the manoeuvre before, but only "to practise".

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