Liz Cheney ends bid for Wyoming Senate seat

US Senate candidate Liz Cheney, far right, talks to supporters as her opponent Senator Mike Enzi, left, also makes the rounds during a tea party rally in Emblem, Wyoming 24 August 2013 Liz Cheney (right) struggled to win support against a popular Republican incumbent in a conservative state

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Liz Cheney, the daughter of former US Vice-President Dick Cheney, has ended her run for a US senate seat from Wyoming, citing a family health crisis.

Ms Cheney, 47, did not specify what the "serious health issues" were.

Ms Cheney, who moved from the Washington area to run for the seat, faced a tough Republican primary contest against popular incumbent Senator Mike Enzi, analysts say.

She recently had a public spat with her sister over her views on gay marriage.

In November, she told a news programme she believed in the "traditional" definition of marriage after a group ran attack ads suggesting that she had previously voiced support for same-sex marriage rights.

The remarks prompted her sister Mary Cheney, who is married to a woman, to post on Facebook: "You're just wrong."

The two sisters have reportedly not spoken in months.

Former Vice President Dick Cheney smiles at his daughter, Liz, as they talk about his new book, "Heart: An American Medical Odyssey," at Little America Hotel and Resort in Cheyenne, Wyoming 13 December 2013 Dick Cheney (left) has expressed support for gay marriage but said Liz Cheney had "always believed in the traditional definition of marriage"

Liz Cheney did not mention those controversies in the statement announcing her withdrawal, but said "my children and their futures were the motivation for our campaign and they will always be my overriding priority".

Her campaign to unseat Mr Enzi, who was first elected to the Senate in 1996 and has maintained a very conservative record, angered many within the party, making it difficult for Ms Cheney to draw support from the Senate and Wyoming politicians.

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