Radiohead stage collapse kills one in Canada

Tony Vella, from Toronto police, explains how the stage collapsed an hour before gates were due to open

Related Stories

One person has died in a stage collapse before a Radiohead concert in the Canadian city of Toronto.

Three others were injured, one seriously, in the incident at Downsview Park, medical officials said.

The collapse happened an hour before the gates were due to open for the concert, with queues already beginning to form outside.

UK rock band Radiohead tweeted that the performance had been cancelled due to "unforeseen circumstances".

Emergency crews went to the scene and the area was evacuated.

'Like a car accident'

Toronto police said the stage collapsed at 16:00 local time (20:00).

Radiohead at the Reading and Leeds Festival, 2009 The Radiohead gig was a sell-out

Police said the person who died was a man in his 30s, but did not reveal his identity.

The victims were all part of a team involved with setting up the stage, officials said.

Alexandra Halbert, who was working in a beer tent at the show, said she was about 200-300 yards away from the stage, with her back to it, when she heard "something that sounded like fireworks".

"I turned around and the whole top part of the stage had collapsed, as well as the scaffolding," she told the BBC.

"It seemed like there were a couple of minutes of hesitation and no one knew quite what to do. It was only afterwards that we all realised how serious it was."

Jason Ip, a food vendor, said there was "chaos" as people waited for the emergency services to arrive.

"A few people started running towards the stage. No one knew exactly what had happened, but it was clear that people were underneath the stage," he said.

"It was like witnessing a car accident. In a situation like that, you just aren't sure how to react."

Some 40,000 people were expected for the sold-out gig, which was also due to feature Canadian musician Caribou.

More on This Story

Related Stories

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

More US & Canada stories

RSS

Features

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.