US military suicide rate hits one per day

US troops await US President Barack Obama at Fort Stewart in Hinesville, Georgia, 27 April 2012 Suicides have outnumbered combat deaths in US troops in 2008 and 2009

Related Stories

Suicide in the US military has sharply increased this year, hitting a rate of almost one death per day, figures show.

As of 3 June, 2012 active-duty suicides reached 154, compared with 130 in the same period last year, the Pentagon confirmed to the BBC.

The number far exceeds US combat deaths for the same period.

"We are deeply concerned about suicide in the military," a Pentagon spokeswoman said, adding it was "one of the most urgent problems" they faced.

While the reasons for the increase are not entirely understood, the Defence department's own data suggest soldiers with multiple combat tours are at greater risk. But a portion of those taking their own life have never deployed, the figures show.

Suicide in the forces had levelled off during 2010 and 2011, but 2012 has seen the fastest pace since the US war in Afghanistan began in 2001.

Strength or weakness?

News of the suicide rate increase comes despite years of effort by the US military to encourage troops to seek help for mental health problems.

Those efforts include setting up confidential telephone hotlines and placing more mental health specialists near the battlefield.

Start Quote

Suicide prevention is first and foremost a leadership responsibility”

End Quote Pentagon spokeswoman

But reports suggest that some in the military continue to believe that going for help is seen as a sign of weakness.

Last month, Major General Dana Pittard, a commander in the 1st Armored Division, retracted an Army blog post made in January in which he told soldiers considering suicide to "act like an adult".

Gen Pittard also counselled soldiers to seek help, but his remarks drew public rebuke from top military officials, including the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Martin Dempsey.

Gen Dempsey said he disagreed with Gen Pittard "in the strongest possible terms", the Associated Press reported.

Pentagon spokeswoman Cynthia Smith told the BBC that "suicide prevention is first and foremost a leadership responsibility".

"Seeking help is a sign of strength," she added.

More on This Story

Related Stories

More US & Canada stories

RSS

Features

  • Mother and childConstant fear

    Saving lives on the front line in the battle with Ebola


  • Dog's headCanine quirk

    The dogs that used to collect money on Britain's railways


  • Hazal Naz BesleyiciHa, ha, ha

    Why are women in Turkey posting laughing selfies?


  • Robert Graves' PoetryUnforgettable war Watch

    The writer who had a lump of granite stuck in his head


  • Hands of clergy in prayer'Two per cent'

    How many men are paedophiles - and is the same true of priests?


BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.