A slice of American life as David Cameron visits

 
David Cameron (left) and Barack Obama at UN General Assembly in New York City on 21 September 2011

David Cameron will arrive in Washington to meet President Obama later on Tuesday and then they will go to Ohio together to watch a baseball game, before discussions focusing on Afghanistan, Syria and Iran.

In a joint article in the Washington Post, the two men say the USA and the UK have an "essential" relationship.

President Obama is really rolling out the red carpet for David Cameron, who's travelling with his wife, Samantha, as well as the foreign secretary and the chancellor.

They'll be greeted by a crowd on the White House lawn, then Mr Cameron will be the first foreign leader to travel with this president on Air Force One.

Business and glamour

They are going to see a basketball game in Ohio. The president is passionate about the sport and British diplomats say the prime minister sees the invitation as a compliment, stressing the value the president places on their friendship.

The serious business comes later, but in their joint article the two men call the relationship between the two countries special because "we count on each other and the world counts on our alliance".

It goes on to say they will discuss Afghanistan, which they describe as "a difficult mission"; Iran, where they agree there is time for a diplomatic solution; and Syria, where they say they will tighten the noose around President Assad.

There is a lot of serious business, but there will also be a lot of glamour, ending with a state dinner in the White House.

 
Mark Mardell, North America editor Article written by Mark Mardell Mark Mardell North America editor

Comments

Jump to comments pagination
 
  • rate this
    -26

    Comment number 1.

    "They are going to see a basketball game in Ohio..."The serious business comes later"

    Amazing how a president that supposedly cares about the economy and the less well off will grotesquely waste taxpayer's money to see a baseball game! Lets see, Air Force One, a support C-17 or C-5, his back up planes, helicopters and local police forces. I wonder how much this primadona is gonna waste this time?

  • rate this
    -21

    Comment number 2.

    I wonder when the US decided to allow pets on air force one. At least cameron is well behaved. Lets hope he doesnt chew through any important wires when obama starts talking to him about war on Iran.

  • rate this
    -33

    Comment number 3.

    We are a small Atlantic island nation Mr Cameron, please stop pretending to punch above our weight. Sort out our own country before playing games with the big boys. From a realistic nineteen year old politics student.

  • rate this
    +28

    Comment number 4.

    #3 "From a realistic nineteen year old politics student"

    You can be any two of those things but not all three. Considering the UK's small size and corresponding population, the UK does "punch above its weight" in military matters. The only two countries who do better, for their population size, is Australia and Canada (as far as the US is concerned).

  • rate this
    +14

    Comment number 5.

    I'm pleased that Cameron and Obama are meeting. They have many difficult issues to discuss, and face-to-face in a relaxed atmosphere has the best chance of being productive for both our countries. (I hope their agenda will permit them time to discuss the economy. The US has a good deal to learn, I think, from the UK about austerity -- and we need the instruction.)

 

Comments 5 of 246

 

This entry is now closed for comments

Features

  • NS Savannah, 1962Nuclear dream

    The ship that totally failed to change the world


  • Irvine WelshScots missed

    Five famous Scots who can't vote in the Scottish referendum


  • Balloons flying upUp, up and away

    Why the ever rising pound is not all good news


  • Espresso cup7 days quiz

    Which city serves the strongest cup of coffee?


  • Jean-Luc CourcoultGiant strides

    The enigmatic Frenchman behind Liverpool's 25ft grandmother


BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.