Rodney King to marry juror from LA police beating case

Rodney King in 2002 Four police were cleared of assaulting Rodney King, prompting riots in which more than 50 people died

Nineteen years after his brutal beating by four LA police officers, Rodney King is marrying a juror from the case.

Graphic video of King's ordeal was shown around the world in 1991.

King sued the City of Los Angeles and won $3.8m (£2.5m) compensation.

Cynthia Kelley, who helped decide the scale of the damages, met him afterwards and they shared a pizza. Now, reports say, the couple have become engaged and hope to marry soon.

'A godsend'

Start Quote

Can't we all just get along?”

End Quote Rodney King Appealing for an end to rioting, 1992

Although they eventually started up a relationship, the pair later split up.

According to Radar Online, it was only when King telephoned Ms Kelley on impulse four months ago that they were reunited.

King described his fiancee as "a godsend" and told the magazine he could not wait to marry her.

He was in his early twenties at the time of the beating and became an important figure in the subsequent trial of the four police officers.

After they were acquitted, rioting broke out in which more than 50 people died.

As the violence went into its third day, King went on television calling for the riots to stop.

"Can't we all just get along?" he said.

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